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Industrial Animals

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Industrial Animals History Activities Front Side: Use your prior knowledge Make a timeline of agriculture education and the industry. Back Side: Pick one event ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Industrial Animals


1
Industrial Animals
  • History

2
Unit Map Follow Along in your packet
  • WHAT ARE YOU LEARNING?
  • AS.06.02(Basic) Recognize, identify, and
    evaluate the effects of diseases and parasites on
    animals.
  • AS.03 Identify breeds of economically important
    animal species.

3
Know Understand Do!
  • Know
  • Types of beef cattle
  • Basic Management practices
  • Basic terminology
  • Understand
  • Use and variation in beef breeds
  • Importance of management in relation to industry
    and health
  • Use of terminology in the industry
  • Do
  • Identify common beef breeds
  • Research disease prevention
  • Define and utilize basic beef vocabulary

4
Key Learning Beef
  • Unit EQ How does animal management lead to the
    dollar menu?

Concept Industry and History Lesson EQ How
has farming changed over the years? Vocab Smith-H
ughes Act, Smith Lever Act
Concept Care and Management Lesson EQ How
is the beef industry successful? Vocab Rotational
Grazing, Polled
Concept Beef Breeds and Uses Lesson EQ What
characteristics define beef breed
uses? Vocab Efficient, Mothering/Calving ability
5
Objectives
  • Understand the history of animal agriculture
  • Understand the important acts that are important
    to this class

6
What is Industrial Agriculture?
  • a modern form of intensive farming that refers
    to the industrialized production of livestock,
    cattle, poultry, and fish. Most of the meat,
    dairy and eggs are produced this way.

7
History of Animal Agriculture
  • Early people ate fruits, seeds, and animals found
    in their environment.
  • People moved with animals
  • People then figured out how to domesticate
    animals
  • People created ways to grow animals more
    efficiently
  • Passed on
  • Recent study of animals in a systematic way

8
History of Animal Agriculture
  • 1800s- Universities. People realize institutions
    of higher learning were needed.
  • Nation emerging as an industrial- and
    agricultural- based economy.

9
History of Animal Agriculture
  • To make progress- people needed to be taught how
    to produce food and manufacture goods more
    efficiently

10
History of Animal Agriculture
  • Late 1850s- Land Grant Act or Morrill Act.
    Provided public land and funds for establishing
    universities to teach practical methods of
    manufacturing and producing food and fiber.
    Passed in 1862
  • 1862- Lincoln signed bill to establish the USDA
  • Soon all states had land grant universities
  • Realized students did not know anything!

11
History of Animal Agriculture
  • 1872- Hatch Act- authorized establishment of
    experiment stations in different parts of the
    states that had land grant universities.
  • Create new knowledge
  • 1914- Smith-Lever Act- set up cooperative
    extension service. Passes new information to the
    public

12
History of Animal Agriculture
  • 1917- Smith-Hughes Act- vocational agriculture as
    a program in the public high schools as a means
    of teaching new methods of agriculture
  • THE REASON YOU ARE SITTING HERE!!!!

13
Activities
  • Front Side Use your prior knowledge
  • Make a timeline of agriculture education and the
    industry.
  • Back Side Pick one event Explain why this
    event was CRUCIAL in the timeline.

14
Industrial Animals
  • Advancements

15
Warm-Up
  • Why does a 1/4 hamburger cost a 1 but a pound of
    hamburger meat cost 2?

16
Objectives
  • Know and understand the advancements in animal
    agriculture
  • Understand where our food comes from

17
Animal Agriculture
  • Advancements through scientific research resulted
    in an abundance of food and lower prices
  • Provides people with a reliable, abundant source
    of high quality food

18
Advancements since 1925
  • Beef cattle live weight marketed per breeding
    female increased from 220 lbs to 482 lbs
  • Consumption doubled from 60 lbs to 120 lbs

19
Advancements since 1925
  • Sheep liveweight marketed per breeding female
    from 60 lbs to 130 lbs
  • Sheep not only raised for wool, now produced for
    meat

20
Advancements since 1925
  • Milk marketed per dairy cow increased from 4,189
    lbs to 10,500 lbs
  • 1950-1975- of dairy cows reduced but milk
    production same

21
Advancements since 1925
  • Swine liveweight marketed per breeding female
    from 1,600 to 2,850 lbs
  • Since 1950, amount of feed reduced
  • Time to produce from 170 to 157 days

22
Advancements since 1925
  • Poultry time for broiler chickens to market
    weight cut in half
  • Amount of feed from 4lbs to 1.75 lbs
  • Weight of broilers at market from 2.8 lbs to 4 lbs

23
Advancements since 1925
  • Annual production per laying hem tripled from
    112 to around 300 eggs
  • Feed required to produce a dozen eggs decreased
    from 8 to 4 lbs

24
Advancements since 1925
  • Turkeys weight marketed turkeys from 13-18.4 lbs
  • Less feed (5.5 to 3.1 lbs) and half the time
    (34-19 weeks)

25
Video
  • http//www.youtube.com/watch?vWWOSe9ju7kU

26
Movie
  • Food, INC
  • Essay What is your view on animal agriculture?
    Do you think what we are doing is wrong or needed
    for our survival? Write at least a page!

27
Industrial Animals
  • Beef

28
Warm-up
  • What is your favorite food?

29
Lesson Essential Question
  • Why is the beef industry so successful?

30
Objectives
  • Understand why beef is important
  • Know and understand the different breeds of beef
    cattle

31
Beef
32
The Beef Industry
  • We are a nation of beef eaters!
  • Average person consumes 67.5 pounds of beef and
    veal each year!
  • Exported beef equals 2.5 billion

33
The Beef Industry
  • Land pastured for beef cattle is too steep, rocky
    or wet to be cultivated
  • Convert forages into high quality protein

34
The Beef Industry
35
The Beef Industry
  • Lean beef is full of nutrients
  • There are over 1 billion head of beef on over 1
    million farms and ranches in the United States.

36
The Beef Industry
  • Successfully wintered outdoors
  • Raised throughout the US
  • Low overhead costs
  • Generate more than any other agricultural
    enterprise

37
The Beef Industry
  • Ranks of Production
  • Texas
  • Missouri
  • Oklahoma
  • Nebraska
  • South Dakota

38
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Read through the packet and answer the questions
    on the breeds of beef cattle.

39
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Black Angus

40
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Shorthorn

41
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Hereford

42
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Texas Longhorn

43
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Simmental

44
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Maine-Anjou

45
Breeds of Beef Cattle
  • Limousin

46
Vocab
  • Forage- livestock feed that consists mainly of
    the leaves and stalks of plants

47
Exit Question
  • How many parts of the beef industry do you think
    there are?

48
Beef Industry
  • Segments

49
Warm-up
  • What type of beef cattle do you typically see
    around here?

50
Lesson Essential Question
  • What are the segments of the beef industry?

51
Objectives
  • Know and understand how the beef industry
    operates based on segments

52
4 segments
  • Purebred operations
  • Cow-calf operations
  • Stocker operations
  • Feedlot operations
  • Fill in organizer as we go

53
Purebred Operations
  • Cattle used as dams and sires of calves grown for
    market
  • Allows improvement and accentuation on stock
  • Shows to select the best

54
Cow-Calf Operations
  • Calves grown out and sent to market
  • Crossbred animals
  • Centered in Southern and Western states
  • Weather for winter calving

55
Cow-Calf Operations
  • Cows fed roughage as grass or hay
  • Cows left on free range to have their calves
  • Calves sold upon weaning
  • Good health, vaccinated, castrated

56
Cow-Calf Operations
57
Stocker
  • Step between weaning of calves and finishing
    (fattening) prior to slaughter
  • Weaned calves weighing 300-500 pounds placed on
    pasture and fed rations to promote skeletal and
    muscular growth

58
Stocker
  • Stocker purchases from cow-calf producer and
    sells to the feedlot
  • May also be operator of feedlot
  • Fewer transportation costs

59
Feedlot
  • Final phase before slaughter
  • Fed high concentrate ration to put on proper
    amount of fat
  • Midwest- produces more grains

60
Feedlot
  • Range in size
  • When proper degree of finish, they are sent to
    the slaughterhouse
  • Generally 18-24 months old and can weigh
    800-1,500 lbs

61
Feedlot
62
Segment Story
  • Get out a sheet of paper. YOU are a calf. Write a
    story about your journey through the segments of
    the beef industry. Be sure to include all steps
    and be as descriptive as possible. At least a
    page!

63
Book Work
  • The Science Of Animal Agriculture
  • Pg. 36-37
  • True or False
  • Fill in the Blanks
  • Discussion Questions

64
Vocab
  • Dam-the mother of an animal
  • Sire- the father of an animal
  • Roughage- a feed low in carbohydrates and high in
    fiber content

65
Vocab
  • Weaned- a young animal no longer dependent on its
    mothers milk
  • Finishing- fattening
  • Ration- the feed allowed for an animal in a 24
    hour period

66
Exit Question
  • What type of meat is this?

67
The Beef Industry
  • Nutrition

68
Warm-up
  • Name the breed of beef cattle that originated in
    the highlands of northern Scotland, the first
    imported to the US in 1873 and can be used for
    milk and meat.

69
Lesson Essential Question
  • How is beef nutrition related to pricing and
    production ?

70
Objectives
  • Provide students with knowledge of feeding
    industrial beef cattle
  • Know needed nutrients for cattle

71
Nutrition
  • Beef cows need most nutritious diet during late
    gestation and lactating
  • Dry, gestating mature cows require little energy
    and protein

72
Nutrition
  • 2 types of forages
  • Pasture or range grasses
  • Fed during the growing season
  • Stored forages
  • Hay or silage
  • Fed to dry, pregnant cows in winter

73
Nutrition
  • Depending on body size, dry, pregnant cows
    consume 25 to 30 lbs of hay per day
  • Beef cattle are raised in areas that require 110
    acres per cow-calf pair

74
Nutrition
  • Intensive Rotational grazing
  • Cattle allowed to access grass for a day or two.
  • 1-1.5 acres can support cow-calf pair for a year

75
Nutrition
  • Bulls can be fed stored forages when not breeding
  • Require grain before, during and after the
    breeding season

76
Nutrition
  • Heifer calves fed a grain ration during their
    first winter
  • Make sure they are heavy enough for breeding at
    13-14 months

77
Nutrition
  • Bulls, cows, and heifers should have access to
    salt and minerals

78
Nutrition
  • Finishing cattle are fed a high-grain,
    high-energy diet containing little forage.
  • Rapid gains and higher carcass quality

79
Feedlot Diet
  • Fed low grain amount at first
  • Gradually increased until 80-90 of diet is grain
  • Require supplemental protein

80
Feedlot Diet
  • Monensin and Lasalocid given to increase weight
    gain and feed efficiency
  • Frame size affects how finishing cattle should be
    fed

81
Feedlot Diet
  • Small-framed cattle- low energy grower grain mix
  • Average- high-energy grain
  • Large- high-energy grain mixes

82
Vocab
  • Silage- a crop, such as corn, that has been
    preserved in its succulent condition by partal
    fermentation

83
Vocab
  • Intensive rotational grazing- Cattle allowed to
    access grass for a day or two.
  • Bull- a male bovine that has not been castrated
  • Heifer- a female bovine that has not produced a
    calf

84
Activity
  • Read the Articles to complete a compare and
    contrast essay on grain fed vs. grass fed beef
    cattle.
  • Minimum 1 page typed essay.

85
(No Transcript)
86
The Beef Industry
  • Parasites and Diseases

87
Warm-up
  • Do you think cattle should be allowed free range
    of feed or continue the way it has been going?

88
Lesson Essential Question
  • How can disease effect the beef industry?

89
Objectives
  • Learn about common diseases and parasites
  • How to treat these diseases and parasites

90
Activity
  • Each group will be given a name and information
    on a certain disease or parasite. This group will
    read the information and will teach the class
    what they have learned. Include causes, symptoms
    and treatment.

91
Mange
  • Mange mites infest hide of cattle
  • Treat with dip in treatment solution

92
Worms
  • Stomach worms
  • Oral wormers are effective
  • Worm eggs at bottom of grass plants
  • Overgrazing increases chance
  • Pasture rotation helps treat

93
Tuberculosis
  • Wasting disease
  • Symptoms similar to Johnes
  • No signs
  • Infected through contaminated water

94
Tuberculosis
  • Herds periodically tested
  • Positive animals removed

95
The Beef Industry
  • Housing and marketing

96
Warm-up
  • Create what you think beef cattle require for
    housing.

97
Lesson Essential Question
  • How is beef marketed?

98
Housing
  • Simple
  • Shelter or windbreak in the most bitter weather
  • Thick trees or brush
  • Well drained
  • Shelter for newborn calves if born during winter

99
Marketing
  • Read through the packet and answer questions at
    the end. We will go over this when everyone is
    finished. Hand this in for a grade!

100
Marketing
  • Using the information you have learned, create a
    brochure on beef. Include popular breeds,
    average price, nutrition benefits, and marketing
    methods used. Color and include pictures!

101
The Beef Industry
  • Cuts of meat

102
Warm-up
  • Where does steak come from?

103
Lesson Essential Question
  • How is beef meat prices and anatomy related ?

104
Cuts of Meat
  • Using organizer of cattle, fill in blanks as we
    go along.

105
Cuts of Meat
  • Chuck
  • Pot roast, short ribs, top blade steak, mock
    tender, ground

Short ribs
Chuck roast
106
Cuts of Meat
  • Rib
  • Rib eye roast and steak, back ribs

Back ribs
Rib eye steak
Rib eye roast
107
Cuts of Meat
  • Short Loin
  • T-bone, porterhouse, tenderloin steaks

Porterhouse
T-bone
108
Cuts of Meat
  • Sirloin
  • Sirloin steaks, tri tip roast and steak

Sirloin steak
Tri tip roast
Tri tip steak
109
Cuts of Meat
  • Round
  • Tip steak, rump roast, round steak, roast

Round tip steak
Eye round steak
Bottom round rump roast
110
Cuts of Meat
  • Flank
  • Flank steak, skirt steak, steak rolls (

Skirt steak
Flank steak
Steak rolls
111
Cuts of Meat
  • Plate
  • Ground

112
Cuts of Meat
  • Breast and foreshank
  • Corned beef, crosscut shank, brisket, ground

Shank cross cut
Beef brisket
Corned beef
113
Cuts of Meat
  • Look through the menus and try to figure out why
    the different types of beef are different prices.

114
Cuts of Meat
  • Now that you have chosen why, read through the
    packet on Beef Cuts Explained. Each group will be
    assigned a cut of beef. Research this more and
    present the information to the class. Include the
    quality and location. Use books and computers.

115
Review
  • Review for Quiz
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