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Envisioning New Futures, Building New Lives: Collaborative Therapy with Multi-Stressed Families

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Title: Envisioning New Futures, Building New Lives: Collaborative Therapy with Multi-Stressed Families


1
Welcome to
Safety-Organized Practice Promoting Safety,
Permanency and Well-Being
Bill Madsen Family-Centered Services
Project www.family-centeredservices.org madsen1_at_co
mcast.net
2
Safety-Organized Practice
  • Draws from
  • Signs of Safety
  • Collaborative Helping
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Motivational Interviewing
  • Narrative and Solution-Focused Therapies

3
CPS Decision-Making
  • This work is messy. It often demands that we
    focus on the exception rather than the rule. At
    the same time, it is important that helping
    responses are grounded in a clearly articulated
    set of assumptions and principles.
  • Efforts to bring order and certainty to work
    characterized by unpredictability run the risk of
    missing the point. We need to (re)discover our
    traditional strengths in working with ambiguity,
    uncertainty and complexity. (Parton and OByrne
    2000)

4
Disciplined Improvisation
  • Responding to the messiness of everyday
    practice often requires on-going learning with
    flexibility and improvisation.
  • Improvisation is too important to be left to
    chance Paul Simon
  • Disciplined Improvisation Developing flexible
    maps to operationalize family-centered values and
    principles in the everyday messiness of practice

5
Usefulness of Maps
  • Can help workers think their way through complex
    situations
  • Can provide a structure that guides constructive
    conversations between workers and families

6
Signs of Safety Overview
  • Initially developed in Australia in late 1990s
    by Andrew Turnell and Steve Edwards bringing
    the best of SFT to child welfare.
  • Expanded upon by Andrew Turnell and Susie Essex
    in their work on Working with Denied Child
    Abuse.
  • Currently being further developed by many
    practitioners in many countries around the world.

7
Objectives of Signs of Safety
  • Engagement - Create a shared focus to guide
    casework among all stakeholders (child, family,
    worker, supervisor, etc.)
  • Critical Thinking - Help these stakeholders
    consider complicated ambiguous case information
    and sort it into meaningful child welfare
    categories
  • Enhancing Safety - Clear the way for stakeholders
    to engage in rigorous, sustainable, on the
    ground child safety efforts

8
Disciplines Involved in SOS
  • A clear and rigorous distinction between harm,
    danger and complicating factors and between
    safety and strengths
  • Rendering all statements in straight-forward
    rather than professionalized language that can be
    clearly understood by all involved.
  • As much as possible all statements focus on
    specific, observable behaviors (e.g. Mary is not
    taking prescribed medication or attending
    appointments with the psychiatrist) and not
    meaning laden, judgment-loaded terms (e.g., she
    is controlling, he is in denial, shes an
    alcoholic).
  • Skillful use of authority.

9
Signs of Safety Transcending Old Dichotomies
  • Historically child welfare has moved back and
    forth between child protection and family
    support.
  • Safety-Organized and Relationship-Based
  • Safety is Job 1!
  • The best way to assure safety is through the
    development of constructive working relationships.

10
Two Important Shifts with SOS
  • Moving towards a balanced assessment of Safety as
    well as Danger.
  • Moving towards a focus on the end of Safety
    rather than simply the means of Services -
    Developing family-centered, community-based
    safety plans.

11
Danger and safety exist on a continuum
Danger Safety
12
Most risk assessments are too one-sided
focusing exclusive attention on harm and danger
is rather like mapping only the darkest valleys
and gloomiest hollows of a particular
territory. Turnell and Edwards, SOS
13
Interviewing for Danger and Safety
  • A practice of using questions having
    conversations that gather rich, detailed,
    pertinent information about this key question

14
Interviewing for Danger and Safety
  • A practice of using questions having
    conversations that gather rich, detailed,
    pertinent information
  • Help key stakeholders (especially the family!)
    think their way through difficult situations
    together
  • Develop a common language, purpose and goals
  • Hold a position of humility and openness
  • Contains a belief in the possibility of change
  • Based in Solution-Focused Interviewing

15
Maps to Guide our Work
16
3 Questions from Signs of Safety
What are we worried about? Whats working well? What needs to happen?
17
Organizing VisionWhere do you want to be headed
in your life?
Collaborative Helping Map
  • Obstacles
  • What gets in the way?
  • Supports
  • What supports you ?

Plan What needs to happen? Drawing on Supports to
address Obstacles to get to Vision
18
Organizing VisionSafety, Permanency and
Well-Being
Integration of CH and SOS Maps
  • Obstacles
  • What are we worried about? / Obstacles to Safety,
    Permanency and Well-Being
  • Supports
  • What is working Well? / Supports for Safety,
    Permanency and Well-Being

Plan What needs to happen?
19
Organizing VisionSafety, Permanency, and
Well-Being
Integration of CH and SOS Maps
  • Worries / Obstacles
  • Harm
  • Danger
  • Complicating Factors
  • Supports
  • Acts of Protection
  • Supporting Strengths

What needs to happen? Agency Goals and Family
Goals Expanding Safety Network Safety Plan
20
Vision
  • Safety, Permanency and Well-Being
  • Fifteen years from now, what story would you want
    your son/daughter to be telling about his/her
    childhood?
  • What hopes and dreams do you have for your child?

21
Obstacles / Worries
  • Harm
  • Danger
  • Complicating Factors

22
Supports / Whats Working Well
  • Safety / Acts of Protection
  • Supporting Strengths

23
Harm, Danger and Risk
  • Harm
  • Past actions by by a caregiver to a child that
    have hurt the child physically, developmentally
    or emotionally
  • Danger
  • Credible worries/concerns child welfare and
    others in the community have about actions that
    caregiver may be taking now or in the future that
    will harm that child
  • Risk
  • The resulting likelihood of repeated future harm

24
Obstacles / Worries
25
Distinguishing Harm/Danger and Complicating
Factors
26
Harm/Danger
27
Complicating Factors
28
Questions to Elicit Worries
  • Are you aware about the worries others have about
    your children and their safety?
  • Do you have any idea what they might have noticed
    that gave them this worry?
  • Does anyone else that cares about you or your
    children share these worries?
  • Do you share these worries? Why or why not?
  • Do you have any worries of your own that it would
    be important for me to know about?

29
What is working well?
30
Distinguishing safety and strengths
31
Safety / Acts of Protection
32
Strengths
33
Questions to Elicit What is Working Well
  • There are a lot of things that are going to be
    important for us to talk about, but can you tell
    me first, when you are at your best as a parent,
    what are things like? What are you doing? If I
    were here then, what would I notice? Who else
    knows about these times?
  • What would be good for me to know about you as a
    family/parent that might be hard for me to see if
    I were only to talk about X (reported problem)?
  • I know things have been really bad, and I want to
    hear about that. I also would really like to
    know, has there ever been a time, even just for a
    moment, when things have been different for you?
    Can you tell me about that time?

34
Questions to Elicit What is Working Well
  • You said that X (problem) had been happening all
    the time, but then last week there was one moment
    when it did not happen. Can you tell me more
    about that?
  • I understand that X has been happening a lot, and
    I do want to hear about it. Can I ask though
    has there ever been a time when X almost could
    have happened, but somehow it did not?
  • When X reported concern happened, how did you
    respond?
  • Have you responded to moments like this in the
    past?
  • How might you respond to moments like this in the
    future?

35
An Example
  • Cheryl is a single parent who made a suicide
    attempt that involved putting her children in a
    separate room and then turning on the gas stove.
    A neighbor smelled gas and broke into the
    apartment finding Cheryl and the children passed
    out. Neighbor called the police and hospital and
    CPS became involved.

36
Safety Mapping
What are we worried about?
Whats working well?
What needs to happen?
  • Danger Statements
  • Expanding the Safety Network
  • Safety Planning
  • Putting children in other room
  • MD and school say all appropriate
  • Left husband after DV
  • Got education
  • Held job for long time
  • Turning on gas with children at home
  • Depression
  • Poverty
  • DV
  • Currently unemployed

37
Safety Mapping
Whats working well?
What are we worried about?
Safety
  • Harm and Danger
  • Turning on gas w/children at home
  • Strengths
  • Putting children in next room
  • MD and school say all appropriate
  • Left husband after DV
  • Got education
  • Held job for long time
  • Complicating Factors
  • Depression
  • Poverty
  • DV
  • Currently unemployed

Questions for Follow Up/What needs to happen
next? Danger Statements, Identifying a Safety
Network and Safety Planning
38
What Needs to Happen? Using Scaling Questions to
Enhance Judgment
  • Ask yourself, supervisor, family, other helpers
  • On a scale from 0-10, with 0 being immediate
    removal and 10 being closing the case, how would
    you rate this particular situation?
  • Some follow-up questions
  • What allowed you to give the rating you did, not
    one less?
  • What concretely would need to happen to increase
    your rating by 1?
  • How do you understand people giving different
    results?

39
What Needs to Happen?SCALING to SMALL ACTION
STEPS
  • On a scale from 0 to 10, with 0 being my
    children were in real danger when I turned on
    that gas, and 10 being my child was always 100
    safe and could never be hurt when I turned on the
    gas, where do you think things were that night?
  • Concretely, what did you do that night that is
    letting you give it as high a number as you are
    giving it? What steps did you take to protect
    your children when you turned on the gas?
  • At what number would you optimally want things to
    be? What action would you need to take in the
    future to get there? What would be the very first
    step?
  • What number do you imagine I (or my supervisor)
    think things were at that night? What action do
    you think we would need to see you taking for our
    number to go up?

40
What Needs to Happen?
Mapping Safety and Danger
Creating Harm Danger Statements Well-Formed
Goals
Safety Planning
Expanding the Safety Network
41
Harm Statements
  • Clear and specific statements about the harm or
    maltreatment that has happened to the child. The
    harm statement needs to include specific details
    who has reported the concern (when it is possible
    to share this), what exactly happened and the
    impact on the child. While never a guarantee, a
    clear understanding of the past (harm) is vital
    as it is always our best guide to understanding
    what we should be worried about in the future
    (danger).

42
Components of Harm Statements
  • Who reported
  • What happened to the child
  • The impact it has had on the child

43
Danger Statements
  • Clear and specific statements that clearly
    identify what the professionals are worried may
    happen if there are not enhanced actions of
    protection by the family and their network.
    Sharing these danger statements with the family
    (and within the agency!) allows a sharpened focus
    to develop on the key elements that need to be
    changed for the case to move forward and helps to
    avoid case drift.

44
Components of Danger Statements
  • -
  • CPS is worried that
  • Behavior of parents (what parents might do)
  • Possible impact on child (what we are worried may
    happen to the child

45
Sample Harm and Danger Statements
  • Impact from Mothers Suicide Attempt
  • Police and Doctors at Mercy Hospital report
    Sharon turned on the gas in her kitchen while the
    children were home, flooding the home with toxic
    fumes, causing both herself and the children to
    pass out.
  • CPS and Doctors at Mercy Hospital are worried
    that Sharon may try to injure herself in the
    future and that the children could be hurt,
    injured or very scared as a result.

46
Sample Harm and Danger Statements
  • Physical abuse after drinking
  • Pediatrician Jones reports that (father) David
    hit his 7 y.o. son Peter 3 times last night after
    drinking more than 4 six packs of beer leaving
    bruises on Peters face, back and legs.
  • CPS is worried that David may get drunk again,
    may hit Peter again, and that Peter could become
    seriously injured as a result.

47
Sample Harm and Danger Statements
  • Sexual Abuse
  • It was reported that step-dad, while high, asked
    16 yr old to have sex with him.  16 yr old said
    no and told mom and boyfriends family and it
    made her feel threatened because step-dad was
    advancing on her. 
  • CPS is worried that step-dad will touch 16 yr old
    private parts and possibly 6 year olds private
    parts resulting in physical and /or emotional
    trauma and family conflict.

48
Harm Statement
  • Kimberly overdosed on heroin and became
    unconscious while cooking dinner. 10 year old
    Paul was home at the time. Her landlady heard the
    fire alarm and had to call the police and open
    the door.

49
Danger Statements
  • CPS, Donna, Ann and the treatment team at the
    hospital are worried Kim might use might use
    heroin again when she is caring for Paul and that
    she might not be able to take care of him, that
    he could see her and get scared, or that he could
    get seriously hurt without her supervision
  • CPS, Kim, Donna, Ann and the treatment team at
    the hospital are all worried that Kim may
    continue to struggle to find a job, that she may
    get depressed and start using drugs again and
    that Paul could get scared or seriously hurt
  • Kim, Donna, Ann and Paul are worried that DCF
    won't see all the good things Kim is doing and
    has done and that they won't be willing to have
    Paul come back to live with Kim

50
Teen witnessing Domestic Violence
  • CPS is worried that Susan may continue to drink
    to excess, that during these times she and John
    will continue to get into physical fights, and
    that Sam may try to put himself in the middle of
    an altercation and become hurt, or that he may
    become so distracted by what is happening at home
    that he does not finish school.

51
Injured Infant
  • Because of the bleeding in the brain baby Anna
    suffered while in mom and dads care in October
    and because no one knows how the injuries
    happened, CPS and doctors at the hospital are
    worried that if nothing changes Anna could be
    seriously injured again, could suffer permanent
    brain damage or even die.

52
Sharing Danger Statements
  • With
  • Caregiver
  • Extended network
  • Appropriate providers
  • Potential
  • Power in being absolutely clear in our concerns
  • Makes clear what areas CPS will really be looking
    for the parents to step up into
  • Keeps shared focus for all involved, avoids case
    drift

53
Expanding the Safety Network
This light bulb seems faulty
Susie Essex Safety Planning in High Risk
Cases,
54
This light bulb still seems faulty
but now weve Installed a whole new lighting
system!
Susie Essex - Safety Planning in High Risk Cases.
55
Enhancing the Safety Network Safety Circles
56
Enhancing the Safety Network Safety Circles
  • Goal
  • Add more people to the inner circle until there
    are sufficient numbers for a functioning safety
    network.

57
Building Safety Networks
  • Its very easy to believe people dont have
    extended networks and wont be willing to inform
    more people about what is going on.
  • At the same time, by asking about formal and
    informal networks the family and community can
    become members of an expanded safety network to
    help move closer to a bottom line of enhanced
    safety for children.

58
Things we Believe about Building Safety Networks
  • CPS involvement in the familys life is
    TEMPORARY.
  • The network of PERMANENT support people implement
    the safety plan!
  • Finding out who the family has already told about
    their CPS involvement building on it is
    important to do right from the start of our work.

59
The Inner Circle
  • ASK Who are the people in your life and your
    childs life who already know about what has
    happened that led to your child/children being in
    care (or to CPS being involved with your
    family)?
  • As the parents/caregivers identify people who
    know what has happened, the names of these people
    are written into the inner circle. Be sure to
    acknowledge the work it might have took to let
    others know about this.

60
The Middle Circle
  • ASK Who are the people in your life and the
    kids lives who know a little bit about what has
    happened who dont know the whole story but
    maybe know some of what has happened? Or maybe
    they know that something has happened but dont
    know any of the details?
  • So then in the middle (second) circle, we write
    the names of those people who know a little bit
    or some of what has happened. Again, you can give
    further compliments to the parents/caregivers as
    more people are identified.

61
The Outer Circle
  • ASK Who are the people in your life and your
    childrens lives who dont know anything about
    what has happened?
  • As these people are identified, their names are
    written into the outermost (third) circle.

62
Moving People from One Circle to Another
  • If there are not already sufficient/appropriate
    people in the inner circle (who meet the criteria
    of already knowing what has happened), the next
    part of the process is to explore who the
    parents/caregivers are willing to move from the
    outer two circles into the inner circle.
  • Remember I said at the beginning that people in
    the safety network would need to know about what
    has happened in the past, well youve already got
    these people in this inner circle who youve been
    willing to talk to about what has happened, so
    youve already got these people as possible
    people for the safety network. So now we need to
    make sure we have enough people in this inner
    circle and the right people in this inner circle
    for the childrens safety network.

63
Moving People from One Circle to Another
  • Who else from these outer circles do you think
    needs to be part of this inner circle?
  • Is there anyone in these two outer circles who
    you have thought about telling or come close to
    telling, but you havent quite gotten there yet?
  • Who would Grandma (for example - pick a person
    already in the inner circle) say needs to be in
    this inner circle with her?
  • Who would the kids want to have in this inner
    circle?
  • You know all of these people, I dont know them
    yet, but who do you think I would want to have in
    this inner circle?
  • Who of all of these people do you feel most
    comfortable with/most understood by and think
    would be important to have as part of the safety
    network?

64
Circle the safe people
  • The information provided by the parents/
    caregivers in response to these questions can be
    represented visually by doing things like putting
    a circle around the names of the people who are
    identified as safe people .
  • How do we create shared definition of safe with
    the family?

65
Using inquiry Getting to know the Network by
asking family for details
  • Now that we have identified a number of people in
    your life who know everything about what has been
    going on, can you tell more about them?
  • How long have you known this person?
  • On a scale from 1 to 10, how confident that this
    person will be able to help you?
  • How would you describe this persons relationship
    with your child?
  • How much time do you spend together?
  • What if everything was working the way you hope
    it will, what role would this person play in your
    success?

66
What do people need to know to be part of the
safety network?
  • ASK You said that these are the people who know
    everything about what has happened. Can we now
    talk about what it is that they actually know?
    What have you told them?
  • A bottom line for the safety network is that
    people in the safety network need to know CPSs
    views about what has happened to the children in
    the past and to understand the worries that
    professionals have about what might happen to the
    children in the future in the parents care.

67
How do we ensure that everyone is informed?
  • The parents/caregivers can take responsibility
    for sharing this information with all the
    potential people for the safety network prior to
    the first safety network meeting.
  • Harm and Danger Statements help to bring everyone
    into the same book, if not the same page

68
How many people do we need in the Network?
  • There is no one definitive required number for
    the safety network that applies to every family
    situation.
  • The number of people needed for the safety
    network needs to be determined based on the
    seriousness and nature of the concerns, the age
    and vulnerability of the children, and the
    availability of the other safety network people.
  • We need to know that there are enough people in
    the safety network to be able to meet the
    day-to-day arrangements required in the safety
    plan.

69
What does the Safety Network have to do?
  • At a minimum, we would expect the safety network
    to
  • Listen to CPSs views about what has happened to
    the children in the past and the worries about
    risk for the children that the safety plan needs
    to address.
  • Come to meetings with the parents/child
    protection services to develop the detailed
    safety plan that will demonstrate to everyone
    that the children will always be safe in relation
    to these identified dangers. The number of
    meetings could be as few as one or two or could
    be as many as a dozen, depending on the
    complexity of the situation.

70
What does the Safety Network have to do?
  • Continue working with the family and CPS to
    monitor how the safety plan is working. This
    depends on how long CPS would need to see the
    safety plan in place and working for them to be
    confident that the plan will continue working
    once CPS close the case.
  • Continue supporting the family to ensure the
    safety and well-being of the children for as long
    as the children remain vulnerable to the
    identified dangers. CPS will need to have the
    conversation about how long the safety network
    will need to be actively involved for with the
    family and the safety network prior to CPS
    closing the case.

71
Well-Formed Goals
  • Goals should always
  • Be collaboratively made or if they cant be,
    they should include choices whenever possible
  • Should be written in clear, everyday language
  • Should be written as much as possible about what
    we are expecting to see happen, rather then that
    we are expecting to see stop

72
Comparing Two Plans
  • Plan 1
  • Cheryl needs to go to the therapist weekly to
    work on depression and the causes and the impact
    it has on her life
  • Cheryl needs to go to the psychiatrist at least
    monthly to make sure she is taking her medication
    and this is working properly
  • Cheryl needs to attend a therapeutic group for
    women facing depression weekly so she can hear
    how other women have responded to this
  • Cheryl needs to go to job retraining course
  • Cheryl needs to go to parenting class

73
  • Plan 2
  • Cheryl agrees to present the following to her
    children and to her safety network
  • Neighbor Paul, sister Sarah, foster mother Trina
    and outreach worker Betsy all agree to be a part
    of Cheryls safety network
  • Cheryl will ask for help with the children if she
    is feeling more than a 7 on a 10 point scale for
    depression
  • Cheryl will not be alone if she is thinking about
    hurting herself again and will ask for help from
    someone in the network if this happens
  • Cheryl agrees to keep a logbook of her work in
    resisting the worse parts of the depression. She
    will scale the impact of the depression every day
    in the book, and write details of everything that
    is helping her reduce that impact.
  • Paul, Sarah, and Trina all agree to call or visit
    once daily (one in the morning, one in the
    afternoon, one in the evening). They will talk
    to Cheryl, ask how she is doing and also scale
    the impact of depression on her. They will also
    talk to the kids and ask them how they are doing.
    When the network visits they will also write in
    the logbook and ensure the children have their
    s as well.
  • Betsy will perform 2-3 visits a week to the home
    and either her or her team will be available 24
    hours a day if Cheryl want to call. During her
    visits she will also scale the impact of
    depression with Cheryl and write in the logbook.
    Betsy will work with Cheryl to make sure she get
    to the MD.
  • Cheryl, the safety network and the GA will meet
    to review this plan again in 3 weeks.

74
Components of Safety Goals
75
Danger Statements to Safety Goals
76
Suggested Formula for Safety Goals
  • ______ will need to work with CPS and a safety
    network (of family, friends and professionals) to
    develop and put into place a safety plan that
    will show everyone that
  • Statements (usually one for each danger
    statement) that describe what the parents will do
    to make sure the children are protected in
    relation to the future danger)
  • CPS will need to see this safety plan in place
    and working for a period of at least ____ months
    so that everyone is confident that the safety
    plan will keep working once CPS withdraws.

77
Questions to Elicit Family Safety Goals
  • If right now you rate the safety for your
    children at a 6, what do you think you would need
    to be doing with your children for you to rate
    the childrens safety at a 10?
  • What else would you be doing in your care of the
    kids that would have you at a 10?
  • And if you did stop using drugs, what would be
    different in the way you were looking after your
    children that would show everyone that you were
    no longer using drugs?
  • What do you think your kids would say they think
    needs to be different for them to always feel
    safe when they are with you?
  • What do you think CPS would need to see you
    doing, in your care of the kids, for them to be
    willing to close the case?
  • What else do you think they would need to see you
    doing?
  • Looking at the statements of what CPS are worried
    may happen to your children (danger statements),
    what do you think you need to be doing with your
    children so that CPS is no longer worried?

78
Existing Safety
  • Examples of times when the family have taken
    action to keep the children safe in relation to
    the identified dangers.

79
Safety Plan
  • Detailed descriptions of how the family will
    achieve these safety goals. The safety plan
    needs to describe the day to day behaviors of the
    parents/caregivers and day to day arrangements
    within the family that will show everyone that
    the children will always be safe in relation to
    the dangers.

80
(No Transcript)
81
Safety Plans
  • Detailed plans in simple language made in
    response to specifically identified and
    understood dangers
  • Describes specific actions that family members
    can/must take to address the dangers (avoid the
    dead mans goals)
  • Are developed and refined over time (they are a
    process not an event)
  • Should involve the children whenever possible
  • Should involve and be communicated to an
    increasingly enhanced safety network of people
    willing to help keep children safe

82
Monitoring the Plan Tools of the trade
  • Who/What/how?
  • Enactments and dry runs (especially at
    less-than-ideal times in the day)
  • Feedback loops Regular meeting of the network
  • Safety journals to be filled out by
    caregiver/network
  • Logbook of visits by network
  • Safety objects for children
  • Rechecking SDM or CAT tools

83
Involving Children in Assessment and Planning
84
The Three Houses Risk Assessment With
Children Nikki Weld and Sonja Parker
House of Worries
House of Good Things
House of Hopes/Dreams
85
Using The Three Houses
  • Obtain permission from parents if possible.
  • One house per sheet of paper.
  • Explain to the child
  • In the first house we will include the things
    that you like in your life. Thats the house of
    good things.
  • In the second house we will write or draw your
    worries. Thats the house of worries.
  • In the third house we will write or draw how
    things would be if they got better. Thats the
    house of dreams.
  • Obtain permission from child to show to others --
    parents, relatives, people that have been
    identified as interested in protecting child.

86
Variations on 3 Houses
Created by Vania da Paz, Perth
87
Introducing Three Houses with Children
  • Explain to child
  • In the first house we will include the things
    that you like in your life. Thats the house of
    good things.
  • In the second house we will write or draw your
    worries. Thats the house of worries.
  • In the third house we will write or draw how
    things would be if they got better. Thats the
    house of dreams.

88
Prompts while drawing 3 Houses
  • Ask child to draw happy or sad faces next to
    their pictures or words. Do any of the happy
    faces help with the sad faces? Which faces are
    those?
  • Is there anything that you would like to be
    different in the house?
  • Who lives in the house? Girl or boy? Grown up or
    child? Pets? Who visits?
  • What are some of the things you like to do
    inside or outside of the house? Friends?
    Activities?
  • Sometimes things happen inside or outside our
    houses that make us feel scared, angry or sad.
    Are there things that make you feel

89
Talking to caregivers about the Three Houses
  • Start with house of good things
  • Worries presented as things child is worried
    about (vs. truth)
  • Become partners in thinking through the
    implications
  • CPS must act as if until proven otherwise.
  • How do you think I should react if I see this as
    true?
  • What do you imagine I will need to see happen
    next?
  • Parent reaction IS information

90
Safety House
91
A method for including childrens voice in safety
planning
92
Rules of the Safety House
Who lives in the House
Who can visit?
Safety Path (scaling)
Who dont I feel safe with
93
The Safety House
  • Overview This is your house in the future when
    you always feel safe.
  • Inner circle Who lives with you in this house?
  • Outer circle around the house Who can come
    visit?
  • Red circle to the side Who shouldnt be allowed
    in?
  • The roof What kind of rules will a house like
    this need to make sure you always feel safe?
  • The path If the beginning of the path is where
    everyone is worried and (known danger is
    happening) and the end of the path is where this
    Safety House exists and no one is worried, where
    are you now? What do adults need to do so you
    could be one step closer to this house?

94
Words and Pictures
95
Words and Pictures Safety Planning With Children
  • A Storyboard
  • Helps to Make Sense of Past and Present Events
  • Helps Families to Talk About Difficult
    Information
  • A foundation for caregiver to begin talking with
    children about safety planning
  • Use Words First
  • Illustrate

96
Words and pictures structure
What Are They Worried About?
Whos Worried?
These Are The People Who Have Agreed To Do
Something About The Worries.
What they are going to do is
97
Overview of Process
Harm Danger Statements Safety Goals
Mapping Office Family
Voice of the Child
Safety Plans
Safety Networks
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