Response to Intervention: Managing Behavior for Academic Success: A Skill-Building Lab Jim Wright www.interventioncentral.org - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Response to Intervention: Managing Behavior for Academic Success: A Skill-Building Lab Jim Wright www.interventioncentral.org PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 606857-NjU4N



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Response to Intervention: Managing Behavior for Academic Success: A Skill-Building Lab Jim Wright www.interventioncentral.org

Description:

Response to Intervention: Managing Behavior for Academic Success: A Skill-Building Lab Jim Wright www.interventioncentral.org Workshop Agenda Essential Elements of ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:278
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 21
Provided by: Mimi82
Learn more at: http://www.jimwrightonline.com
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Response to Intervention: Managing Behavior for Academic Success: A Skill-Building Lab Jim Wright www.interventioncentral.org


1
Response to Intervention Managing Behavior for
Academic Success A Skill-Building Lab Jim
Wright www.interventioncentral.org
2
Workshop Agenda
3
RTI Listening to the Teachers Voice
4
Essential Elements of RTI (Fairbanks, Sugai,
Guardino, Lathrop, 2007)
  1. A continuum of evidence-based services available
    to all students" that range from universal to
    highly individualized intensive
  2. Decision points to determine if students are
    performing significantly below the level of their
    peers in academic and social behavior domains"
  3. Ongoing monitoring of student progress"
  4. Employment of more intensive or different
    interventions when students do not improve in
    response" to lesser interventions
  5. Evaluation for special education services if
    students do not respond to intervention
    instruction"

Source Fairbanks, S., Sugai, G., Guardino, S.,
Lathrop, M. (2007). Response to intervention
Examining classroom behavior support in second
grade. Exceptional Children, 73, p. 289.
5
RTI Pyramid of Interventions
6
What is the Connection Between RTI the
Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA)?
7
Essential Elements of the Functional Behavioral
Assessment (FBA)
  • Functional assessment is a collection of
    methods for obtaining information about
    antecedents, behaviors, and consequences The
    purpose is to identify the reason for the
    behavior and to use that information to develop
    strategies that will support positive student
    performance while reducing the behaviors that
    interfere with the childs successful
    functioning.

Source Witt, J. C., Daly, E. M., Noell, G.
(2000). Functional assessments A step-by-step
guide to solving academic and behavior problems.
Longmont, CO Sopris West..pp. 3-4.
8
Essential Elements of the Functional Behavioral
Assessment (FBA) (Cont.)
  • From this definition, several things are
    clear. First, functional assessment is not a
    single test or observation. It is a collection of
    methods involving a variety of assessment
    techniques, including observations, interviews,
    and review of records, that are conducted to
    acquire an understanding of a childs behavior.
  • Second, the definition clarifies exactly what is
    assessedthat is, the childs behavior as well as
    what happens just before the behavior occurs and
    what happens as a result of the behavior.
  • Third, the definition states clearly the goal of
    functional assessment, which is to identify
    strategies and interventions to help the child.

Source Witt, J. C., Daly, E. M., Noell, G.
(2000). Functional assessments A step-by-step
guide to solving academic and behavior problems.
Longmont, CO Sopris West..pp. 3-4.
9
Behavioral Disabilities BD and RTI (Gresham,
1992)
  • Resistance to intervention may be defined as
    the lack of change in target behaviors as a
    function of intervention. Given that the goal of
    all interventions is to produce a discrepancy
    between baseline and post-intervention levels of
    performance, the failure to produce such a
    discrepancy can be taken as partial evidence for
    a BD classification.

Source Gresham, F. M. (1992). Conceptualizing
behavior disorders in terms of resistance to
intervention. School Psychology Review, 20, p. 25.
10
Factors Influencing the Decision to Classify as
BD (Gresham, 1992)
  • Four factors strongly influence the likelihood
    that a student will be classified as Behaviorally
    Disordered
  • Severity Frequency and intensity of the problem
    behavior(s).
  • Chronicity Length of time that the problem
    behavior(s) have been displayed.
  • Generalization Degree to which the student
    displays the problem behavior(s) across settings
    or situations.
  • Tolerance Degree to which the students problem
    behavior(s) are accepted in that students
    current social setting.

Source Gresham, F. M. (1992). Conceptualizing
behavior disorders in terms of resistance to
intervention. School Psychology Review, 20, 23-37.
11
The Purpose of RTI What Students Should It Serve?
12
Big Ideas in Student Behavior Management
13
(No Transcript)
14
(No Transcript)
15
(No Transcript)
16
Big Ideas Similar Behaviors May Stem from Very
Different Root Causes (Kratochwill, Elliott,
Carrington Rotto, 1990)
  • Behavior is not random but follows purposeful
    patterns. Students who present with the same
    apparent surface behaviors may have very
    different drivers (underlying reasons) that
    explain why those behaviors occur. A students
    problem behaviors must be carefully identified
    and analyzed to determine the drivers that
    support them.

Source Kratochwill, T. R., Elliott, S. N.,
Carrington Rotto, P. (1990). Best practices in
behavioral consultation. In A. Thomas and J.
Grimes (Eds.). Best practices in school
psychology-II (pp. 147169). Silver Spring, MD
National Association of School Psychologists..
17
Common Root Causes or Drivers for Behaviors
Include
  • Power/Control
  • Protection/Escape/Avoidance
  • Attention
  • Acceptance/Affiliation
  • Expression of Self
  • Gratification
  • Justice/Revenge

Source Witt, J. C., Daly, E. M., Noell, G.
(2000). Functional assessments A step-by-step
guide to solving academic and behavior problems.
Longmont, CO Sopris West..pp. 3-4.
18
Big Ideas Be Proactive in Behavior Management
(Martens Meller, 1990)
  • Teachers who intervene before a student
    misbehaves or when the misbehavior has not yet
    escalated have a greater likelihood of keeping
    the student on task and engaged in learning.

ABC Timeline
A
Source Martens, B.K., Meller, P.J. (1990). The
application of behavioral principles to
educational settings. In T.B. Gutkin
C.R.Reynolds (Eds.), The handbook of school
psychology (2nd ed.) (pp. 612-634). New York
John Wiley Sons.
19
Big Ideas Behavior is a Continuous Stream
(Schoenfeld Farmer, 1970)
  • Individuals are always performing SOME type of
    behavior watching the instructor, sleeping,
    talking to a neighbor, completing a worksheet
    (behavior stream).
  • When students are fully engaged in academic
    behaviors, they are less likely to get off-task
    and display problem behaviors.
  • Academic tasks that are clearly understood,
    elicit student interest, provide a high rate of
    student success, and include teacher
    encouragement and feedback are most likely to
    effectively capture the students behavior
    stream.

Source Schoenfeld, W. N., Farmer, J. (1970).
Reinforcement schedules and the behavior
stream. In W. N. Schoenfeld (Ed.), The theory
of reinforcement schedules (pp. 215245). New
York Appleton-Century-Crofts.
20
Big Ideas Academic Delays Can Be a Potent Cause
of Behavior Problems (Witt, Daly, Noell, 2000)
  • Student academic problems cause many school
    behavior problems.
  • Whether a students problem is a behavior
    problem or an academic one, we recommend starting
    with a functional academic assessment, since
    often behavior problems occur when students
    cannot or will not do required academic work.

Source Witt, J. C., Daly, E. M., Noell, G.
(2000). Functional assessments A step-by-step
guide to solving academic and behavior problems.
Longmont, CO Sopris West, p. 13
About PowerShow.com