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Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte 1848

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Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte 1848 A product of the Age of Romanticism Emphasis on the natural Importance of feeling over – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte 1848


1
Wuthering Heights Emily Bronte 1848
2
A product of the Age of Romanticism
  • Emphasis on the natural
  • Importance of feeling over "thinking
  • Darker aspects of human existence
  • We may be vicious, brutal, and perverse
  • Light of civilization may not triumph over
    darkness

3
The Lure of the Gothic to make your blood run
cold
  • Taste for terror
  • Eerie and supernatural
  • Gloomy, often crepuscular setting
  • Wild and overgrown landscapes
  • Melancholic
  • Ghosts, specters, and monsters-
  • Murky lines between villain and hero

4
The Gothic was one way in which the
people of the Victorian Age expressed a sense of
helplessness about forces beyond their control
frightening rebellions throughout Europe and the
Industrial Revolution to name a couple. In
this genre readers could share their fears about
the Ages suffering, injustices and other unseen
evils.
5
Helpful Terminology
  • doppelganger- a ghostly counterpart- a double of
    a living person- specially when he/she haunts
    its fleshly counterpart
  • xenophobia- fear of strangers, outcast, or
    foreigners
  • frame story- a story within a story- layers of
    storytelling featured
  • wuthering- stormy and tumultuous
  • Fairy tale, medieval romance, wish fulfillment-
    see notes on website

6
George Gordon Lord Byron The archetype for
the Byronic Hero Mad, bad and dangerous to
know... Lady Caroline Lamb, speaking of Byron
7
Thomas Macauleys definition A man proud,
moody, cynical, with defiance on his brow and
misery in his heart, a scorner of his kind,
implacable in revenge, yet capable of deep and
strong affection.
8
Characteristics of the Byronic hero
  • Devastatingly attractive, yet fatally flawed
  • Outcast- painfully yet defiantly alone
  • Individualist, a rebel- defy conventions
  • Intellectually searching
  • Brooding- usually over some past sin
  • Tenacious
  • Mysterious
  • Ambitious, but doomed
  • Misunderstood
  • Compulsion to experience the forbidden
  • Misanthropic

9
Characteristics of the anti-hero
  • anti-hero-a reluctant hero who would not consider
    himself capable of accomplishing the goal. He
    might be selfish, addicted, corrupt, sullen or
    disaffected. Rebellious- often a loner. By the
    end of the journey the anti-hero typically
    transforms into a fuller, happier or more
    complete person due to the struggles he or she
    endures, even if he/she has to die.
  • Examples of
  • Thelma and Louise
  • Tyler Durden- The Fight Club
  • Rocky Balboa of Rocky
  • Dr. Gregory House from House
  • the emotionally fractured Meredith of Greys
    Anatomy
  • Dexter, the likeable blood-spatter expert for the
    Miami PD who also happens to be a serial
    killer...but kills bad guys only. Here we have
    hero and villain rolled into one compelling
    anti-hero package
  • John Proctor- The Crucible
  • McMurphy- One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest

10
Guiding Questions
  • Use of our terms, doppelganger, frame,
    xenophobia, Byronic hero
  • Two peripheral storytellers- why and effect?
  • Use of gothic, revenge drama, medieval romance,
    fairy tale?
  • What happens at midpoint? Anticlimactic?
  • Evaluate the hero- moral, immoral, amoral?
  • Effects of castigation and isolation of character
  • Role of setting
  • Role of violence
  • Perversion of convention- disquietude-contradictio
    ns
  • Evaluate the ending
  • Use of stereotyped characters
  • Treatment of love

11
www.rosalindwhitman.com/Etchings.htm
Lockwood's Dream             
Lockwood attacked by Dogs             
Flight over Rooftops              
Bulldog Bite            
The Fall of Hareton              
Storm over the Heights            
The Return of Heathcliff              
    
Heathcliff embraces Isabella              
Deranged at the Grange              
The Last Meeting            
Birth Death              
Absorbing Subject            
12
Depictions of Catherine and Heathcliff
13
Out on the wiley, windy moors We'd roll and fall
in green. You had a temper like my jealousy Too
hot, too greedy. How could you leave me, When I
needed to possess you? I hated you. I loved you,
too. Bad dreams in the night You told me I was
going to lose the fight, Leave behind my
wuthering, wuthering Wuthering Heights.
Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've come
home. Im so cold, let me in-a-your window
Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've come
home. Im so cold, let me in-a-your window.
Ooh, it gets dark! It gets lonely, On the
other side from you. I pine a lot. I find the
lot Falls through without you. I'm coming back,
love, Cruel Heathcliff, my one dream, My only
master. Too long I roamed in the night. I'm
coming back to his side, to put it right. I'm
coming home to wuthering, wuthering, Wuthering
Heights, Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've
come home. I'm so cold, let me in-a-your window.
Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've come
home. I'm so cold, let me in-a-your window.
Ooh! Let me have it. Let me grab your soul
away. Ooh! Let me have it. Let me grab your
soul away. You know it's me--Cathy!
Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've come
home. Im so cold, let me in-a-your
window Heathcliff, it's me, Cathy, I've come
home. Im so cold, let me in-a-your window.
Heathcliff, it's me, your Cathy, I've come
home. I'm so cold.
14
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