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Title: Managing Your Records And The


1
Managing Your Records And The Local Records
Act
2
Are You Running Out Of Room To Store Your
Records?
  • If so the Local Records Act provides a way for
    you to systematically and legally dispose of your
    records.

3
The Local Records Act(50 ILCS 205)
  • The Local Records Act was passed in 1961 to
    provide a method for local government agencies to
    legally dispose of their records.

4
What Types Of Agencies Are Subject To The Local
Records Act?
  • Municipalities
  • Junior Colleges
  • School Districts
  • County Agencies
  • Townships
  • MEG Units
  • Special Districts Such As Mosquito Abatement
    Districts, Local Airport Authorities, Fire
    Protection Districts, Library Districts

5
Local Records Commission Members
  • A Chairman of a County Board, who shall serve as
    the Chairman of the Commission.
  • A County Auditor
  • A States Attorney
  • A Mayor or President of a City, Village, or
    Incorporated Town
  • All of the aforementioned are appointed by the
    Governor

6
Local Records Commission Members
  • The State Archivist and
  • The State Historian

7
Local Records Commission Meetings
  • Meetings of the Local Records Commission are held
    monthly in the Norton Building and are open to
    the public.
  • The Norton Building is located in the Capitol
    Complex in Springfield.

8
Norton Building
9
How Does The Office of the Secretary of State
Become Involved In This Process?
  • The Secretary of State serves as the State
    Archivist.
  • One of the duties of the State Archivist is to
    provide the support staff to the Local Records
    Commissions and the State Records Commission.

10
What is a public record under the Local Records
Act?
  • "Public record" means any
  • book
  • paper
  • map
  • photograph
  • digitized electronic material,
  • or other official documentary material,

11
Public Records
  • regardless of physical form or characteristics,
  • made, produced, executed or received by any
    agency or officer pursuant to law or in
    connection with the transaction of public
    business and
  • preserved or appropriate for preservation by such
    agency or officer, or any successor thereof,
  • as evidence of the organization, function,
    policies, decisions, procedures, or other
    activities thereof, or because of the
    informational data contained therein.

12
Non-Records
  • Library and museum material made or acquired and
    preserved solely for reference or exhibition
    purposes, extra copies of documents preserved
    only for convenience of reference, and stocks of
    publications and of processed documents are not
    included within the definition of a public
    record. (Source P.A. 89-272, eff. 8-10-95.)

13
Are faxes, videos, emails, and instant messages
records, etc.?
  • Yes, depending on the information contained in
    the fax, email or instant message or the
    information recorded on the dvd, cd, video, or
    cassette tape, etc.
  • If the information fits the aforementioned
    definition, it is a public record subject to the
    provisions of the Local Records Act regardless
    of the media in which the data is maintained.

14
Can We Scan Our Documents?
  • Yes, effective January 1, 2001, the Local Records
    Act (50ILCS205) was amended to allow Local
    Government agencies to reproduce existing public
    records in a digitized electronic format with the
    intent to dispose of the original records.

15
What type of media is acceptable for storage of
electronic records?
  • They must be reproduced on a "durable medium that
    accurately and legibly reproduces the original
    record in all details," and "that does not permit
    additions, deletions, or changes to the original
    document images.

16
Disposing of Original Records and Replacing
Originals With Digitized Records
  • Each agency is also under the obligation to file
    a Records Disposal Certificate with the
    appropriate Local Records Commission before any
    original record may be disposed of and before the
    reproduced digital record is disposed of.

17
Digitized Records
  • Agencies must remember that any information that
    was a public record when produced in paper
    remains a public record when produced or
    maintained in any digital format, and that any
    information created as, or converted to, an
    electronic format is a government asset and must
    be retained for any period required by law or
    Local Records Commission regulations.

18
Freedom of Information Act Digitized Records
  • In addition, the digital records must be
    "retained in a trustworthy manner so that the
    records, and the information contained in the
    records, are accessible and usable for subsequent
    reference at all times while the information must
    be retained."

19
FOI Act
  • For more detailed information about the Freedom
    of Information Act please contact the IL
    Attorney Generals Office (217)782-1090
  • http//www.ag.state.il.us/

20
What if I do not want to have an application
done?
  • Disposing of any public record, regardless of
    format, before its retention is complete and
    notification given to the Local Records
    Commission is a Class 4 felony.
  • 720 ILCS 5/32-8

21
Why Is It Important To HaveA Records Inventory?
  • The records inventory is vital to an effective
    records management program because it identifies
    the scope and quantity of the records of an
    organization.
  • The information that comes from the records
    inventory serves as the basis for all decisions
    concerning the direction your records program
    will follow.

22
Other Reasons You May Find Having A Records
Inventory To Be Beneficial
  • The inventory provides your agency with a
    ready-made FOI List.
  • If you have a disaster, the inventory will help
    you determine what records may have been lost.
  • It is the first of 2 steps to provide your agency
    with a way to legally dispose of your records.

23
Preparing For Our Visit
  • Make Sure The Area Where The Records Are
    Maintained Is Easily Accessible

24
Provide Easy Access To Records That Are To Be
Inventoried
25
What Information Is the Field Representative
Looking For?
  • The earliest date for each record series.
  • The annual accumulation in cubic feet.
  • The total volume of each series in cubic feet.
  • The arrangement of each series.

26
How Does A Local Records Unit Field
Representative Inventory Our Records?
  • The inventory may be a hands-on inventory of the
    records in your office and storage areas.
  • It may be done by question and answer.
  • Or a combination of the two.

27
After The Inventory
  • The field representative will prepare all the
    necessary documentation for submission to the
    Local Records Commission for you.

28
Application For Authority To Dispose of Local
Records
  • This form is the final, typed version of the
    inventory worksheets that were prepared by the
    Local Records Unit field representative.
  • The cover sheet for the application must be
    signed by the head of the agency prior to
    submission to the Local Records Commission.

29
(No Transcript)
30
Records Listed On The Application May Be
Disposed Of Providing
  • the individual retention period is complete, and
    providing any local, state, and federal audit
    requirements have been met
  • no litigation is pending or anticipated
  • the records are correctly listed on a Records
    Disposal Certificate submitted to and approved by
    the appropriate Local Records Commission sixty
    (60) days prior to the intended destruction date

31
There May Be Other State And/or Federal Statutes
or Regulations
  • If so, the records retention schedule approved by
    the Local Records Commission does not relieve
    local governments of retention requirements
    mandated by other state and federal statutes and
    regulations.
  • When such an obligation does exist, then the
    longer retention period takes precedence.

32
Digitizing or Microfilming Records
  • Agencies can digitize or microfilm records and
    dispose of the originals in accordance with the
    standards of Local Records Commission Rules and
    if the film or the digitized record is retained
    for the prescribed retention period.
  • Disposal of records after microfilming or
    digitizing must be noted on the Records Disposal
    Certificate.

33
What Will My Records Retention Schedule Look Like?
34
(No Transcript)
35
The Item No. And the Record Series Title
Description of Items or Record Series
103. Bids, Specifications, and Proposals
  • Item
  • No.

36
What Was The Earliest Date Of The Record Series,
The Field Representative Found At The Time of
Inventory?
  • Dates 1966-
  • Dates (1895-1911)

Item No. Description of Items or Record Series
103. Bids, Specifications, and Proposals
Dates 1966-

37
What Was The Total Volume Of The Series At The
Time Of The Inventory?
  • Volume Negligible
  • Volume 36 ½ Cu. Ft.
  • Estimating Cubic Feet
  • 1 Full Letter Size Drawer 1.5 Cu. Ft.
  • 1 Full Legal Size Drawer 2.0 Cu. Ft.
  • 1 Full Lateral File Size Drawer or Banker
    Box 2.5 Cu. Ft.

38
Miscellaneous Measurements
  • If you just have a few file folders (less than
    .25 Cu. Ft. then Negligible will be entered.
  • A box about the size copy paper is received in
    generally holds approximately 1 Cu. Ft.

39
Annual Accumulation
  • Annual Accumulation Negligible

Item No. Description of Items or Record Series
103. Bids, Specifications, and Proposals
Dates 1966-
Volume 36 ½ Cu. Ft.
Annual Accumulation Negligible
40
How Was The Series Filed?
  • Arrangement Chronological and
    Numerical by Project No.
  • Arrangement Alphabetical
  • Arrangement Numerical
  • Arrangement Alpha-numerical

Item No. Description of Items or Record Series
103. Bids, Specifications, and Proposals
Dates 1966-
Volume 36 ½ Cu. Ft.
Annual Accumulation Negligible
Arrangement Chronological
41
The Minimum Retention Period
  • Recommendation
  • Retain successful bids for ten (10) years after
    terms of the related contract are completed, then
    dispose of.
  • Retain unsuccessful bids for three (3) years
    after rejection, then dispose of.

42
Must An Agency Dispose Of Records When The
Minimum Retention Period Has Been Met?
  • No, you may retain the records for as long as you
    need or want after the minimum retention period
    has been met.
  • Even if you have submitted a Local Records
    Disposal Certificate indicating you intend to
    dispose of the records 60 days after the date of
    submission, you may still keep the records
    longer if you want to.

43
How Often Should Disposal Certificates Be
Submitted?
  • Most agencies will submit one disposal
    certificate per year.

44
How Does The Commission Determine How Long A
Record Should Be Retained?
  • The values that should be considered in
    appraising records are
  • Administrative Value
  • Fiscal Value
  • Legal Value
  • Historical or Archival Value

45
Appraisal Process
  • A sound records disposition program requires a
    realistic appraisal of the records in relation to
    their period of usefulness and value to the
    agency that created them as well as their
    usefulness to the public.

46
By appraising records you
  • Establish reasonable retention periods
  • Identify records that can be destroyed after your
    retention schedule has been approved and a
    disposal certificate processed
  • Identify records with lasting value that should
    be retained permanently

47
Administrative Value
  • The primary administrative use of most records
    is exhausted when the transactions to which they
    are related have been completed. From that point
    on they lose their value rapidly.

48
Administrative Value
  • However, some administrative records contain
    basic facts about an agencys origin, policies,
    functions, organization, and significant
    administrative decisions.
  • These types of records should be preserved to
    provide adequate documentation of an agencys
    operations.
  • An example of a record with a permanent
    administrative value agency rules, regulations,
    policies, and procedures

49
Legal Value
  • Records have legal value if they contain evidence
    of legally enforceable rights or obligations of
    the agency such as legal decisions and opinions
    fiscal documents representing agreements, such as
    leases, titles and contracts and records of
    action in particular cases, such as claim papers,
    legal opinions, and legal dockets.

50
Fiscal Value
  • (Financial Transactions) After records have
    served their basic administrative function, they
    may still have sufficient fiscal value to justify
    their retention in storage for a time to protect
    the agency against court action or to account for
    the expenditure of funds.

51
Research, Historical or Archival Value
  • Some records have enduring value because they
    reflect significant historical events or document
    the history and development of an agency. The
    importance of preserving such records is obvious.

52
Special Note
  • The word "permanent" for archival and retention
    purposes means forever. Such records are assessed
    as having permanent historical value.
  • The term should not be confused with "indefinite"
    nor should such a recommendation be made
  • Retention periods of 20 or 40 years are not
    uncommon for records, yet such retention periods
    are not referred to as "permanent."

53
Work and Salary History
  • Beginning Ending Dates Of Employment
  • Titles Held By The Employee
  • Salary Changes
  • Salary At The Time Of Separation Of Employment
  • How Much Un-paid Sick Leave Did The Employee Have
    At The Time of Termination

54
Student Records
  • The retention period for student records is taken
    directly from the Student Records Act

55
We Have Received Our New Application. What Is
Our Next Step?
  • Educate your staff about
  • the Local Records Act.

56
Should We Store Our Application With All Our
Other Files?
  • Place your application and blank disposal
    certificates in a special folder or notebook and
    mark on the outside
  • (TO BE RETAINED PERMANENTLY)
  • Inform your staff where the folder or notebook
    is to be retained.

57
Disposal Certificates
  • File all disposal certificates with the
    Application.
  • Establish who will complete the Disposal
    Certificates in the future.

58
Disposing of Records
  • Complete a Local Records Disposal Certificate.
  • Mail the Disposal Certificate to the Local
    Records Commission Sixty (60) Days Prior to the
    Intended Disposal Date.

59
Sample Local Records Disposal Certificate
60
The Application Number
  • WHERE DO I FIND MY APPLICATION NUMBER?
  • APPLICATION NUMBERS ARE LOCATED ON THE COVER
    SHEET OF YOUR APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY TO
    DISPOSE OF LOCAL RECORDS IN THE UPPER RIGHT HAND
    CORNER.

61
(No Transcript)
62
Completing the Disposal Certificate
Application Item No. Record Series Inclusive Dates Cubic Feet To Be Disposed Of
2. Administrative Correspondence 1984-2002 2 Cu. Ft.
12. Disbursing Orders 1986-1998 Neg.
19. General Assistance Reports Expenditures 1952-1996 Neg.
63
What Do I Do If I Have An Older Retention
Schedule And Want To Dispose Of Records Not
Listed On My Application?
  • Call the Local Records Unit
  • (217)782-7075

64
IRAD
  • Such regulations shall also provide that the
    State Archivist may retain any records which the
    Commission has authorized to be destroyed, where
    they have a historical value, and that the State
    Archivist may deposit them in the State Archives,
    State Historical Library, or a university
    library, or with a historical society, museum, or
    library.

65
If An Agency Turns Their Records Over to IRAD
Can They Have Copies?
  • The officer or clerk depositing such records may,
    upon request, obtain from the Archivist, without
    charge, a certified copy or reproduction of any
    specific record, paper or document when such
    record, paper or document is required for public
    use.
  • For more information call (217)785-1266

66
IRAD DEPOSITORIES
  • Northern IL University
  • Northeastern IL University
  • Western IL University
  • IL State University
  • University of IL Springfield
  • Eastern IL University
  • Southern IL University Carbondale

67
Does Your Storage Area Look Like This?
68
Or Perhaps This?
69
Or Maybe Someone Thought Using The Old Drunk Tank
Would Make A Good Records Storage Area
70
What Is The Ideal Temperature Humidity For
Records Storage?
  • The ideal temperature and humidity for records
    storage is 64 degrees Fahrenheit with a variance
    of only 3 degrees in a 30 day period and a
    humidity of 40 plus or minus 3 in a 30 day
    period

71
Storing Blueprints
72
Temperature and Humidity
  • Large swings in temperature and humidity can take
    years off the life of your records.
  • So if you cannot store your records in a room
    with the ideal conditions, at least try to keep
    the temperature and humidity stable.

73
Effects of Humidity
  • High humidity can cause mold spores to activate
    hot and dry conditions can result in brittle
    documents.

74
Tips on Records Storage
  • Take pro-active measures to prevent future
    damages to your records

75
Storage of Records in Basements
  • If you must store records in a basement that
    might have seepage, place the records in boxes on
    shelves or on pallets if possible.

76
Storing Records on Pallets
  • Plastic pallets are preferable however,
    sometimes you can find free wooden pallets that
    can be covered with inexpensive plastic sheeting.

77
Storage of Records on Basement Floors
  • If you cannot afford pallets or shelving units
    that would keep records off of a damp floor,
    loosely wrap the outside of the boxes with clear
    plastic.
  • If the boxes do get wet, take the records out of
    the damp boxes as soon as possible.

78
Chemicals Hazardous Materials
  • Never store records near hazardous chemicals or
    flammable materials, that if spilled would stain
    or otherwise damage your records.

79
Records Storage
  • Attics can easily reach a temperature of 100
    degrees in the summer months in Illinois.
  • If at all possible store records in another
    location.
  • Also, attics frequently have mice and sometimes
    bird droppings.

80
Records Storage
  • If records are stored in areas where the roof
    leaks on occasion, cover the tops of the boxes or
    filing cabinets with plastic.
  • If at all possible do not store records near
    water heaters.

81
What Is A Good Storage Box Size?
  • A box that will hold approximately 1 cubic foot
    of records is ideal.
  • Typical box dimensions of a 1 cubic foot box are
    15" x 12" x 10".
  • Boxes with lids and cut-outs for handles are
    preferred.

82
Storing Records In Cubic Foot Size Boxes
  • Legal size documents can be filed upright
    alongside the 15" side of the box
  • Letter-size documents can be filed upright along
    the 12" side of the box.

83
Where Can I Buy The 1 Cu. Ft. Boxes?
  • Local Government Agencies may purchase the 1
    cubic feet boxes from the Illinois Department of
    Corrections, Division of Industries
  • (217)782-558-2207
  • http//www.idoc.state.il.us/ (click on the link
    for Industries)
  • ici_at_idoc.state.il.us

84
Storing Heavier Materials
  • Materials of lesser dimensions such as 5" x 8" or
    4" x 6" cards and microfilm reels can also be
    stored in the standard 1 cu. ft. storage box .
  • Be careful not to fill it above the handles when
    packing microfilm or heavier materials.

85
The Importance Of A Good Box Label
  • Record Series Title
  • Beginning Ending Dates
  • Box Content List
  • Disposal Date

86
Sample Box Label
87
Box Listing
Office Office Cafeteria Cafeteria Date 7/6/05
Box No. Dates Title Item Disposal Date Retention Period
05-001 01/03-02/04 Health Dept. Inspection Reports 4 June 2008 3 Yrs.
05-002 03/04-06/05 Health Dept. Inspection Reports 4 June 2008 3 Yrs.


88
CONFIDENTIAL RECORDS
  • Whenever possible store in a locked room or
    cabinet

89
Confidential Records
  • Information security is not limited to paper
    documents.
  • When disposing of records which could be used for
    identity theft or violate privacy laws use a
    cross-cut multi-media shredder which can shred
    cds, floppy disks, and paper or you might opt to
    incinerate if there are no city ordinances
    restricting such.

90
Electronic Records
  • Protect your computer records i.e. with
    firewalls, anti-spy software, passwords etc.
  • Store back up records off-site.

91
Electronic Records Storage
  • Take care with portable devices such as
    Blackberries (if found could someone hack into
    your system or gain confidential company
    information).

92
Electronic Records Storage
  • Do not leave cds, thumb drives, or other record
    media with confidential information where they
    could easily be stolen.

93
Imagine This Is Your School Library or Office
94
Does Your Disaster Plan Look Like This?
  • HELP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

95
Do You Think This Can Not Happen In Your Town?
Capitol Avenue Springfield, IL
96
This Photo Was Taken Inside the State Archives
Bldg.
  • 300 boxes were moved to the 1st floor in
    approximately 14 minutes

97
Disaster Preparedness
  • EMERGENCY
  • Or
  • DISASTER

98
Emergencies
  • An adverse event that does not have widespread
    impact and does not require the use of
    extraordinary or prolonged resources to return
    conditions to normal.

99
DISASTERS
  • An adverse event that is organization- wide or
    community-wide
  • Resulting in significant damage and loss that
    requires the use of prolonged or extraordinary
    resources to return conditions to normal

Grafton, IL
100
PURPOSE OF A DISASTER PLAN
  • Ensure the safety of people
  • Ensure continued delivery of critical
  • and essential functions and services
  • Reduce losses and damage to records, facilities,
    and systems.

101
BENEFITS OF A DISASTER PLAN
  • Quick resumptions of business operations
  • Enhanced safety and awareness of risk
  • Protection of vital records and original
    records and information resources

102
FOUR PHASES OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT
  • Mitigation/Prevention
  • Preparedness
  • Response
  • Recovery

103
STEPS IN DEVELOPING A DISASTER RECOVERY PLAN
  • Secure approval from senior management
  • Collect Data Such as Names of Suppliers,
    Restoration Service Providers, and other
    Emergency Contacts
  • Develop and Write the Plan

104
STEPS IN DEVELOPING A DISASTER RECOVERY PLAN
  • Distribute the Disaster Recovery Plan and Train
    Your Employees (Disaster Planning Committee and
    Disaster Response Team)
  • Test and Exercise
  • Evaluate Your Plan and Maintain the Plan Updating
    Information About Vendors, Suppliers, etc. Every
    Six Months.

105
Suggested Components of a Recordsand Information
Disaster Plan
  • 1. Table of Contents
  • 2. Introduction Explain To The Employees Why A
    Disaster Plan Is Important That They Will Be
    Called Upon For Certain Tasks
  • 3. Copies Of Your Records Retention Schedule(s)
  • 4. List Of Your Most Vital Records
  • 5. List of Supplies and Equipment Needed

106
Additional Components Of A Disaster Plan
  • 6. Vendor, Expert, and Contractor Information
  • 7. Salvage and Recovery Procedures
  • 8. Arrangements for off-site storage and/or
    recovery
  • 9. Who is responsible for security and how will
    the site be secured.

107
Additional Components To A Disaster Recovery
Plan
  • Make A Phone Tree
  • Include Home Phone s
  • Pager s
  • Cell Phone s
  • Designate Who Is To Make The Calls And Who Will
    Be Responsible For Calling Each Team Member

108
List of Emergency Contacts
  • Medical, Utility, Emergency
  • Responders Information

109
Location of Utilities
  • Floor Plans Diagrams
  • Water Shut-off Locations
  • Power Shut-off Locations

110
Other Needs
  • 1. An air-conditioned space to which damp and wet
    records can be moved.
  • 2. Someone to help manage logistics for the
    transfer and control of records stored.

111
Supplies
  • Fans
  • Dehumidifiers
  • Flashlights With Extra Batteries
  • Clothesline or Nylon Fishing Line
  • Disinfectant such as Lysol
  • Scissors

112
Additional Supplies
  • Milk Cartons
  • Cafeteria Trays
  • Storage Boxes
  • Blotting Paper
  • Freezer Paper
  • Paper Towels
  • Wet-dry Vacuum

113
Supply List
  • Water Proof Markers
  • Large Garbage Bags
  • Plastic Garbage Cans
  • Large Rolls of Plastic
  • Rubber Gloves
  • Camera to Photograph Damages

114
Beginning The Clean-up
115
HANDLING WET DOCUMENTS
  • Paper is very fragile when it is wet. Handle
    it carefully.

116
CLEANING WET DOCUMENTS
  • If items are still wet, agitating them in a bath
    of clear water will remove excess dirt. This
    treatment should never be attempted for images
    which are blurred, feathered, or faded.
  • Dirt left by receding flood waters may be
    contaminated.
  • Precautions such as the use of rubber gloves
    should be taken when handling some documents.

117
AIR DRYING
  • Wet books, documents, or photographs which cannot
    be air dried within two days should be frozen to
    inhibit mold growth.

.
118
EMPLOYEES MOLD
  • Many people are sensitive to mold.
  • Also, some mold species are toxic.
  • If any health effects are observed when treating
    mold consult a doctor or mycologist before
    proceeding. The local health department may be
    able to help as well.

119
How Can I Tell If The Mold Spores Are Dormant?
  • Active mold looks fuzzy or slimy.
  • Dormant mold is dry and powdery.
  • If the mold appears fuzzy or slimy do not attempt
    to remove the mold it may only spread or smear.

120
IDEAL CONDITIONS FOR MOLD GROWTH
  • The best way to prevent or stop an outbreak of
    mold is to remove items from environmental
    conditions that encourage mold growth
  • high temperature,
  • high relative humidity,
  • stagnant air, and
  • darkness.

121
Mold Can Set Up In 48 Hours In A Humid
Environment
122
CIRCULATING AIR
  • Circulating air will effectively dry most items.
  • Physical distortions may result, but document
    information will be saved.
  • To provide optimal air drying conditions, fans
    should be positioned for maximum air circulation
    (do not aim air flow directly at drying
    materials).

123
AIR DRYING TIPS
  • Blotting material for air drying should be clean
    and absorbent. Options include blotter paper,
    unprinted newsprint paper, paper towels, clean
    rags, mattress pads, etc.
  • Screening material (such as window screens) well
    supported and stacked with space between them
    provide an excellent compact drying surface.
  • A porous surface assists air circulation and
    promotes drying.

124
GLOSSY MATERIALS
  • Without intervention glossy materials such as
    paperback book covers, magazines, art books, etc.
    are likely to stick together.
  • If they are highly valued, these items should be
    the first priority for salvage.
  • Loose glossy materials should be spread out in
    one layer for air drying.

125
BOUND GLOSSY MATERIALS
  • Bound glossy materials must be interleaved
    between every page to prevent sticking.
  • Wax paper should be used as interleaving
    material.
  • Volumes of glossy paper dried in this way may
    suffer considerable physical distortion.

126
BOOKS
  • Place interleaving material between the text
    block and the front and back covers.
  • If time and supplies allow interleaving material
    should be placed intermittently throughout the
    text as well.
  • Fan volumes open and stand them on edge with the
    interleaving paper extending beyond the edges of
    the book.

127
ENHANCING THE DRYING OF BOOKS
  • Evaporation of water as it wicks into the
    interleaving paper will enhance drying.
  • Replace interleaving paper as it becomes soaked
    and invert the volume each time to insure even
    drying.

128
Microfilm Restoration
  • Microfilm must be kept wet until it can be dried
    properly. But do not keep immersed for more than
    3 days.
  • Contact a microfilm processing lab for
    restoration.

129
If You Have Additional Questions About Disaster
Planning and Recovery Please Call
  • Dottie Hopkins-Rehan, Conservator
  • (217)782-2610
  • John Reinhardt
  • (217)524-6700
  • Gloria Huston
  • (217)782-1082

130
Contacting the State Archives
  • Appointments with field representatives and
    questions about disposal certificates
  • (217)782-1080
  • Questions about retention periods
  • (217)782-1082
  • Copies of teaching packets
  • (217)782-2226
  • Questions about IRAD Records
  • (217)785-1266
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