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POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS (PBIS)

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Title: RTI Squared, Cubed and Quartered: Linking response to intervention and positive behavior support. Author: ecs Last modified by: Justyn Poulos – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS (PBIS)


1
  • POSITIVE BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONS AND SUPPORTS
    (PBIS)

2
In Partnership with OSEPs TA Center on Positive
Behavior Support
  • Co-Directors Rob Horner
  • University of Oregon
  • George Sugai
  • University of Connecticut
  • www.pbis.org
  • www.swis.org

3
Why do we need a district-wide approach to
address behavior needs?
  • Proactive district-wide discipline systems help
    to establish a learning culture within which both
    social and academic success is more likely.

4
Schools face a set of difficult challenges today
when dealing with behavioral needs
  • Multiple expectations (Academic accomplishment,
    Social competence, Safety)
  • Students arrive at school with widely differing
    understandings of what is socially acceptable.
  • Traditional get tough and zero tolerance
    approaches are insufficient.
  • Faculty come with divergent visions of effective
    discipline

5
MOST EFFECTIVE TRENDS IN SCHOOL DISCIPLINE
PRACTICES
  • Proactive school-wide discipline systems
  • Social skills instruction
  • Academic/curricular restructuring
  • Behaviorally based interventions
  • Early screening identification of antisocial
    behavior patterns
  • (Biglan, 1995 Gottfredson, 1997 Colvin, et al.,
    1993 Lipsey, 1991, 1992 Mayer, 1995 Sugai
    Horner, 1994 Tolan Guerra, 1994 Walker, et
    al., 1995 Walker, et al., 1996)

6
What is District-wide Positive Behavior
Interventions and Supports (SW-PBIS)?
  • PBIS is a broad range of proactive, systemic and
    individualized strategies for achieving important
    social and learning outcomes in safe and
    effective environments while preventing problem
    behavior with all students (Sugai 2007)

7
What has research shown for schools implementing
PBIS?
  • Creates learning environments that proactively
    deal with behaviors.
  • Improves support for students with specialized
    behavioral needs.
  • Maximizes on-task behavior and increases learning
    time for all students.

8
What does PBIS emphasize?
  • The PBIS decision-making process emphasizes 3
    integrated elements to provide measureable
    outcomes for students
  • DATA sources to support decision-making,
  • PRACTICES that support student behavior, and
  • SYSTEMS that support staff behavior.

9
?
Social Competence Academic Achievement
Positive Behavior Support
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
Supporting Staff Behavior
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Adapted from What is a systems Approach in
school-wide PBS? OSEP Technical Assistance
on Positive Behavioral Interventions
and Supports. Accessed at http//www. Pbis.org/sch
oolwide.htm
Supporting Student Behavior
10
Data Collection
  • PBIS recommends the ability to isolate and
    analyze the following five data points
  • Referrals by Problem Behavior,
  • Referrals by Location,
  • Referrals by Time,
  • Referrals by Student, and
  • Average referrals by Day and by Month

11
Improving Decision-Making
From
Problem
Solution
To
Problem Solving Using Data
Solution Monitor Outcome
Problem

12
Supporting Student Behavior
  • Universal (Tier 1) instruction support for all
    district learners
  • Targeted (Tier 2) interventions for areas of need
    determined from data analysis
  • Individualized (Tier 3) supports required for
    individual students with high-needs or specific
    situations.

13
Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems for Students with
High-Risk Behavior
SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
5
Secondary Prevention Specialized Group Systems
for Students with At-Risk Behavior
15
Primary Prevention School-/Classroom- Wide
Systems for All Students, Staff, Settings
80 of Students
14
Supporting Staff Behavior
  • Reduce teacher stress
  • Increase teacher efficacy in teaching replacement
    behaviors
  • Support teachers in designing classroom
    management systems

15
Six Key Elements of PBIS
  • Define, teach and acknowledge positive behaviors.
  • On-going collection and use of data for
    decision-making regarding implementation of
    systems that support effective practices.
  • Continuum of universal supports, targeted
    interventions, and individualized supports.

16
Six Elements (cont.)
  • Implement evidenced-based behavioral practices
    with fidelity and accountability
  • Arrange the environment to prevent the
    development and occurrence of problem behavior
  • Screen universally and monitor student
    performance and progress continually.

17
PBIS TRACK RECORD
  • Highly successful in many other states
  • Many excellent resources available free on-line
  • Interest in Wisconsin schools is growing
    exponentially
  • DPI acting to respond to this interest need

18
When SWPBIS is implemented well more students
find their school an effective learning
environment.
19
www.pbis.org
20
Current Status Nationally
  • Main Messages
  • SWPBIS is possible (over 13,000 schools)
  • SWPBIS is effective at (a) reducing problem
    behavior, (b) improving academic achievement, and
    (c) improving perceived faculty effectiveness
  • Coaching is critical to (a) implementation with
    fidelity and (b) sustained use of SWPBIS
  • Coaching is perceived a major contributor to the
    cultural fit of SWPBIS to a community/ school.

21
SWPBIS in 13,331 schools 8/10
Wisconsin
Illinois
22
A View of SWPBIS in Wisconsin
  • Themes
  • Child as the unit of impact, School as the unit
    of implementation, District as the unit of
    coordination.
  • Use data for continuous improvement, cultural
    fit, sustainability.
  • Are we doing what we said we would do?
  • Is what we are doing benefiting children?
  • Build the systems needed to support effective
    practices.
  • Never train school teams without also training
    the Trainers, Coaches and Evaluators who will
    make the practices endure

23
Likely Outcomes
  • The following are examples of some of the
    progress made in a few Illinois and North
    Carolina schools that have implemented PBIS.

24
Eisenhower Jr. High, Schaumburg IL. School
District 54 Suspensions Expulsions Across Two
Years
25
Washington Elementary School, Champaign IL.
School District 4 Total ODRs Over Three Years
26
Foreman High School Office Discipline Referrals
by Month by Year
ODR per day per month per 100 students per
average daily enrollment
Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan
Feb March April May
June
Months
27
North CarolinaPositive Behavior Support
Initiative
Non-PBS Comparison
Levels of behavior risk in schools implementing
PBS were comparable to widely-accepted
expectations and better than those in comparison
schools not systematically implementing PBS.
28
Research on Time Lost to Discipline
Teacher Student Administrator
Referrals 5 minutes 20 minutes 10 minutes
In-School Suspensions 5 minutes 6 hours 20 minutes
Out-of-School Suspensions 5 minutes 6 hours 45 minutes
Barrett and Swindell - 2002
29
Example of Time at the Middle School
ODRs In-School Suspensions Out-of-School Suspensions
Administrator 12,790 Minutes 213 Hours 2,040 Minutes 34 Hours 3,735 Minutes 62 Hours
Student 1,443 referrals 294 students 1,770 Hours 295 school days 1,464 Hours 244 school days
30
District Commitments
  • High priority in District Improvement Plans
  • 3-5 year commitment
  • Continuation of the district leadership team
  • Ongoing staff development
  • Allocation of resources

31
Building Commitments
  • Establish and maintain building PBIS team.
  • Identify building coaches
  • Training for and implementation by all staff
  • Effectively use student information systems

32
PBIS APPROACH WORKS!
  • Data driven building decision-making
  • Clear expectations that are universally known
  • Focuses on positive interaction and acknowledges
    appropriate behavior.
  • Proactive rather than reactive
  • Supports a positive learning environment
  • Delivers results

33
www.pbis.orgwww.wisconsinPBISnetwork.orgwww.pbss
urveys.orgwww.swis.org
Resources
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