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Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme

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Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme Managing Complexity in the Face of Uncertainty Ch03: How to Scope a Project Presented by – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Effective Project Management: Traditional, Agile, Extreme


1
Effective Project Management Traditional, Agile,
Extreme
Managing Complexity in the Face of Uncertainty
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
  • Presented by
  • (facilitator name)

2
Summary of Chapter 3
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
  • Managing client expectations
  • Conditions of satisfaction
  • Planning and conducting a project scoping meeting
  • Gathering requirements
  • Diagramming business processes
  • Prototyping your solution
  • Business validation
  • Procurement Management
  • Writing an effective Project Overview
    Statement (POS)
  • Approval to Plan the Project

3
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Tools, Templates Processes used to Scope a
Project
  • Conditions of Satisfaction
  • Project Scoping Meeting
  • Requirements Gathering
  • Diagramming Business Processes
  • Prototyping
  • Validating Business Cases
  • Procurement Management
  • Outsourcing
  • Project Overview Statement
  • Approval to Plan the Project

4
Managing Client Expectations
  • Somehow clients always seem to expect more than
    project managers are prepared for or capable of
    delivering.
  • This lack of communication starts at the
    beginning of a project and extends all the way to
    the end.
  • The project manager assumes he or she knows what
    the client is asking for, and the client assumes
    the project manager understands what they are
    asking for.

5
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Client Wants vs. Client Needs Dilemma
What your client wants may not be what your
client needs. Your job is to make sure that what
they want is what they need and that you will
deliver what they need.
6
Client Wants vs. Client Needs Dilemma
  • The disconnect may come about because the client
    is swept up in a euphoria over the technology
    (for example, they may be enamored with what they
    see on the Web)
  • The disconnect can also come about because the
    client does not really know what they need.
  • Wants tend to be associated with a solution that
    the client envisions. Needs tend to be associated
    with the problem.
  • To be safe, always ask the client why they want
    what they want.

7
Conducting Conditions of Satisfaction
  • You should begin every project with a
    communications tool called Conditions of
    Satisfaction (COS).
  • The COS is a structured conversation between the
    client (the requestor) and the likely project
    manager (the provider).
  • The deliverable from the COS is a one-page
    document (with attachments) called the Project
    Overview Statement (POS).

8
Conducting Conditions of Satisfaction
  • The POS is a template that is used to clearly
    state what is to be done.
  • It is signed by the requestor and the provider
    who participated in the COS exercise.
  • When the POS is approved by senior management,
    the Scoping Phase is complete.

9
Conducting Conditions of Satisfaction
  • The process of developing the COS involves the
    following four parts
  • 1. Request. A request is made.
  • 2. Clarification. The provider explains what he
    or she heard as the request.
  • 3. Response. The provider states what he or she
    is capable of doing to satisfy the request.
  • 4. Agreement. The requestor restates what he or
    she understands the provider will provide. The
    conversation continues until the provider is
    satisfied that the requestor clearly understands
    what is being provided.

10
Establishing Clarity of Purpose
  • The next step in the COS process is to negotiate
    to closure on exactly what will be done to meet
    the request. Obviously, some type of compromise
    will be negotiated.
  • The final agreement is documented in the POS.
  • As shown in Figure 3-1, this process repeats
    itself until there is an agreed-on request that
    is satisfied by an agreed-on response.

11
Establishing Clarity of Purpose
  • As part of this agreement, the POS should include
    a statement of success criteria that specifies
    when and how the request will be satisfied.
  • The success criteria will become part of the POS.
  • The result is documented as the COS and serves as
    input to the POS.
  • This early step of establishing and agreeing to
    what will be done is very important to the
    projects success.

12
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Establishing Conditions of Satisfaction
13
Specifying Business Outcomes
  • it is a good idea to specify within the COS
    exactly what outcomes demonstrate that the COS
    has been met. The outcomes have been called
    success criteria
  • it is a quantitative measure (for example,
    profit, cost avoidance, and improved service
    levels) that defines success.

14
Conducting COS Milestone Reviews
  • The COS is not a static agreement. It is a
    dynamic agreement that becomes part of the
    continual project monitoring process.

15
Planning and Conducting the Project
Scoping Meeting
  • You may have had a COS session and agreed on a
    high-level scope for the project but need more
    detail in order to write a POS.
  • The Project Scoping Meeting takes the COS
    deliverable to the next level of detail.
  • In this meeting, the core project team will be
    present, as will the client, several key
    managers, staff, and end users of the project
    deliverables.

16
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Planning and Conducting the Project Scoping
Meeting
  • Purpose
  • Document requirements
  • Project Overview Statement
  • Attendees
  • Project Manager
  • Client Group
  • Core Team Members
  • The Facilitator Technographer

17
The facilitator group
  • This group comprises two or three individuals who
    are experienced in conducting scoping and
    planning meetings.
  • The facilitator group will have a meeting
    facilitator, a requirements gathering
    facilitator, and a position that the author calls
    a technographer.
  • The two facilitators are often the same person.
  • A technographer is the recording secretary for
    scoping and planning meetings who has solid
    experience using a variety of high-tech tools.
    Larger projects may require two such
    professionals.

18
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Planning and Conducting the Project Scoping
Meeting
  • Agenda
  • Introductions
  • Purpose of the Meeting (led by Facilitator)
  • COS (conduct or review if done earlier)
  • Description of current state (led by client
    representative)
  • Description of problem or business opportunity
    (led by client representative)
  • Description of end state (led by client
    representative)
  • Requirements definition and documentation (led by
    facilitator)
  • Discussion of the gap between current and end
    state (led by project manager)
  • Choose best-fit project management approach to
    close the gap (led by project manager)
  • Draft and approve the POS (whole scope planning
    group)
  • Adjourn

19
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Planning and Conducting the Project Scoping
Meeting
  • Deliverables
  • COS
  • Requirements Document
  • Best-fit project management life cycle (PMLC)
  • POS

20
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Who is Our Client?
  • Good Client
  • Know what they want
  • Know what it takes to deliver
  • Work towards best solution
  • Easy to work with
  • Meaningfully involved
  • Not So Good Client
  • Not sure of what they want
  • Constantly change their mind
  • Not interested in solving project problems
  • Hard to satisfy
  • Not very involved

Project manager team (PT) must satisfy the
needs of both.
21
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
What Are Requirements?
  • A requirement is something the product/project
    should
  • do/produce or a quality that it must have.

22
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Different Perspectives on Requirements
23
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Categories of Requirements
  • Functional
  • Non-functional
  • Global
  • Product/project constraints

24
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Definition Functional Requirement
  • Functional requirements specify what the product
    or
  • service must do.

For example The service shall accept a
scheduled time and place for delivery.
25
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Definition Non-Functional Requirement
  • Non-functional requirements demonstrate
    properties
  • that the product or service should have in order
    to do
  • what must be done.

These requirements are the characteristics or
qualities that make the product or service
attractive, usable, fast, or reliable.
For example The product shall have a homemade
appearance. or The product shall be packaged
so as to be attractive to senior citizens.
26
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Definition Global Requirement
  • Global requirements describe the highest level of
  • requirements within the system or product. They
    can be
  • thought of as general requirements.

For Example The system shall run on the
existing network. or The system must be
scalable.
27
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Definition Product/Project Constraints
  • Product/project constraints are those
    requirements that,
  • on the surface, resemble design constraints or
    project
  • constraints.

Project constraints cover the areas of budget and
schedule along with deadlines and so on.
For example The maximum system response time
for any client-based transaction must not exceed
4 milliseconds. or The total cost plus
five-year maintenance must not exceed 35
million.
28
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Approaches to Requirements Gathering
  • Facilitated Group Session
  • Interview
  • Observation
  • Requirements Reuse
  • Business Process Diagramming
  • Prototyping
  • Use Cases

29
Approaches to Requirements Gathering
  • Selecting the best methods to generate potential
    requirements for the project is the
    responsibility of the project manager, who must
    evaluate each method for costs, ease of
    implementation with the client, and risks.
  • Further, selection of a particular method should
    be based on specific product and project needs,
    as well as proven effectiveness.
  • Certain methods have been proven effective for
    specific client groups, industries, and products.

30
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Facilitated Group Session Method
  • Strengths
  • Excellent for cross-functional processes
  • Detailed requirements are documented and verified
    immediately
  • Resolves issues with an impartial facilitator
  • Risks
  • Untrained facilitators can lead to negative
    responses
  • Time and cost of planning and executing can be
    high

31
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Interview Method
  • Strengths
  • End user participation
  • High-level description of functions and processes
    provided
  • Risks
  • Descriptions may differ from actual detailed
    activities
  • Without structure, stakeholders may not know what
    information to provide
  • Real needs ignored if analyst is prejudiced

32
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Observation Method
  • Strengths
  • Specific/complete descriptions of actions
    provided
  • Effective when routine activities are difficult
    to describe
  • Risks
  • Documenting and videotaping may be time
    consuming, expensive and have legal overtones
  • Confusing/conflicting information must be
    clarified
  • Misinterpretation of what is observed

33
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Requirements Reuse Method
  • Strengths
  • Requirements quickly generated/refined
  • Redundant efforts reduced
  • Client satisfaction enhanced by previous proof
  • Quality increase
  • Reinventing the wheel minimized
  • Risks
  • Significant investment to develop archives,
    maintenance and library functions
  • May violate intellectual rights of previous owner
  • Similarity may be misunderstood

34
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Business Process Diagramming
  • Strengths
  • Excellent for cross-functional processes
  • Visual communications
  • Verification of what is/what is not
  • Risks
  • Implementation of improvement is dependent on an
    organization being open to changes
  • Good facilitation, data gathering and
    interpretation required
  • Time-consuming

35
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Prototyping
  • Strengths
  • Innovative ideas can be generated
  • Users clarify what they want
  • Users identify requirements that may be missed
  • Clientfocused
  • Early proof of concept
  • Stimulates thought process
  • Risks
  • Client may want to implement prototype
  • Difficult to know when to stop
  • Specialized skills required
  • Absence of documentation

36
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Use Case Scenarios
  • Strengths
  • State of system described before entering the
    system
  • Completed scenarios used to describe state of
    system
  • Normal flow of event/exceptions revealed
  • Improved client satisfaction and design.
  • Risks
  • Newness has resulted in some inconsistencies
  • Information may still be missing from scenario
    description
  • Long interaction required
  • Training expensive

37
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Building the Requirements Breakdown Structure
38
Building the Requirements Breakdown Structure
  • The RBS is a hierarchical description of what the
    solution has to do in order to acceptably meet
    client needs.

39
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
RBS The Reality
40
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Characteristics of the RBS
  • The RBS is intuitive and most meaningful to the
    client
  • The RBS is a deliverables based approach
  • The RBS is consistent with the PMI PMBOK
  • The RBS remains client facing as long as possible
    into the planning exercise

41
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Advantages of using the RBS
  • Does not require a trained facilitator
  • Does not require learning one of the contemporary
    approaches to requirements gathering
  • Presents an intuitive approach to gathering
    requirements
  • Allows the client to work with the project team
    in an environment familiar to them, i.e., to stay
    in their own comfort zone
  • Paints a clear picture of the degree to which the
    solution is clearly defined
  • Provides the input needed to choose the best fit
    PMLC Model

42
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
What is a Business Process?
  • A business process is a collection of activities
    that take
  • one or more inputs from one or more different
    sources
  • and produces a change of state that delivers
    business
  • value.

Input A
Change of state
Input B
Input C
Business Process
43
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Creating a Business Process Diagram
44
Creating a Business Process Diagram.
  • Operation Denotes that a change has taken place.
    The input is somehow changed as a result of
    having gone through this process.
  • Movement Denotes the movement of output from one
    process step to become the input to the next
    process step.
  • Decision Denotes that a question needs to be
    answered. There are two flow paths that emanate
    from a decision box Yes or True and No or False.
    You follow one of these paths based on the
    decision.
  • Inspection Someone other than the person
    producing the output must inspect it for quality,
    conformance, or some other tangible
    characteristic.

45
Creating a Business Process Diagram.
  • DocumentDenotes a paper document.
  • Delay Denotes a wait state in a process. Its
    usually associated with something joining a queue
    and waiting for the operator of the next process
    step to become available.
  • Storage Indicates that an item has been placed
    in storage and must wait for a release before
    moving to the next process step. This usually
    represents wasted time that must be removed from
    a process.

46
Creating a Business Process Diagram.
  • AnnotationProvides added detail about some
    process, which is needed for clarification. It
    might also include the position title of the
    person responsible for the process.
  • Direction of Flow Denotes the order of process
    steps.
  • Transmission The interrupted arrow indicates
    when information is to be transmitted from one
    physical or virtual location to another.

47
Creating a Business Process Diagram.
  • Connector Connects the flow between two separate
    locations often used as an off-page connector.
  • Boundaries Denotes the initiating and closing
    processes of a flow diagram. Usually the words
    START or BEGIN are associated with the initiating
    process, and STOP or END with the closing process.

48
Business Process Diagram Formats
  • Three common formats are used
  • The top-down and left-to-right format It is
    commonly used in program and system flow charts.
  • Swim-lane format It identifies the actors
    who participate in the business
  • Context Diagrams One way to describe your
    process at a very high level

49
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
The Top-Down Left to Right Format
50
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
The Swim Lane Format
51
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Context Diagramming Process
52
Context Diagrams
  • Describes a rough process or a set of processes.
  • It generally has only the following few
    components
  • A stick figure representing the external entity
    that is triggering the process
  • A large circle representing the organization
    responding to the request
  • A text block showing each organization or process
    acting to fulfill the request
  • Arrows showing the rough flow between text blocks

53
Prototyping Your Solution
  • Many clients cannot relate to a narrative
    description of a system but they can relate to a
    visual representation of that system.
  • Its original purpose was to help clients define
    what they wanted.
  • By showing them a mock-up of a solution, they
    could comment on it and give the developers more
    insight into what constitutes an acceptable
    solution.

54
Use Cases
  • Figure 3-9 depicts the position of use cases in
    the overall project scoping.

55
Use Cases
  • Project scoping can be part of the Scoping
    Process Group or Planning Process Group.
  • In Figure 3-9, project scoping is between the
    Scoping Process Group, which has the POS as
    output, and the Planning Process Group.
  • Requirements gathering consists of several
    different approaches of which use cases is but
    one.
  • After the use cases have been defined and
    documented, a single requirements document is
    assembled, and the project can move to the
    approval stage or, if the approval stage has
    already been reached, to the Planning Phase.

56
Use Case Diagrams
  • A use case diagram is a simple way to describe
    how an individual interacts with a business
    process.
  • It consists of one of more stick figures (the
    actors), ovals (the process steps), and
    connecting arrows (the interactions)
  • An actor initiates the use case by interacting
    directly with the system. The system gathers
    information from the actor, processes it, and
    returns a result to the actor.

57
Use Case Flow of Events
  • This document reads like the script in a play.
  • It is initiated with an action by the primary
    actor, the system responds, the actor takes
    another action, and this back and forth exchange
    continues until the use case ends.

58
Validating the Business Case
  • A very important question will be, Does the
    resulting business value exceed the total cost of
    the deliverables?
  • You can expect to provide any number of financial
    analyses such as cost/benefit, Return on
    Investment (ROI), breakeven, and cash flow
    analyses, among others.
  • Some of these might accompany the POS.

59
Use Case Diagram
60
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Outsourcing to Vendors and Contractors
  • You do not have the necessary skills and
    competencies on your staff
  • Buying the solution is less costly and more
    effective than building the solution
  • There is a commercial product available that will
    meet your needs
  • It is more cost effective to have a specialist
    provide the service
  • It is not part of your core business activity
  • You would like to develop the skills by first
    using a contractor

61
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management The Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
Vendor Selection
62
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Publish Request for Information (RFI)
  • Advertise
  • Rent a targeted list
  • Include previous vendors
  • Attend a trade show where potential vendors
  • are likely to have a booth
  • Preparing and Distributing a Request for
    Proposal
  • Manage RFP responses and questions
  • Respond online
  • Answer questions individually
  • Hold a bidders conference

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
63
Preparing and Distributing a Request for Proposal
  • You need to state the time conditions for
    response, which means that you state
  • how many days you will give people to respond, as
    well as
  • how long you will need to review the responses
    before making a choice.

64
RFP
  • RFP should contain the following
  • Introduction
  • Business profile
  • Problem or opportunity
  • POS (optional)
  • RBS (optional)
  • Vendor responsibility
  • Contract administration
  • Instructions to vendors
  • Vendor point of contact
  • Time and cost estimates
  • Pricing
  • Evaluation criteria

65
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Establish Vendor Evaluation Criteria
  • Evaluate responses to RFP
  • Reduce list of companies
  • Conduct onsite presentations

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor evaluation consists of creating a rule by
which all RFP responses are evaluated on the same
scale.
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
66
Establish Vendor Evaluation Criteria
  • an evaluation team is involved
  • criteria that might be necessary should be
    eliminated.
  • Criteria might be classified as must have,
    should have, or it would be nice to have,
  • There are several quantitative models for
    evaluating and ranking vendors such as
  • Forced Ranking, and
  • Paired Comparisons

67
Establish Vendor Evaluation Criteria
  • There are several qualitative factors that might
    be used. They include the following
  • Corporate experience with similar work
  • Financial stability
  • Technical approach
  • Personnel experience, skills, and competencies
  • Risk management processes
  • Location
  • Applicable tools, templates, and processes
  • References for similar work

68
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Evaluation Criteria Forced Ranking
Consultant Vendor A B C D Rank Sum Forced Rank
1 2 3 2 4 11 3
2 4 1 1 2 8 1
3 6 2 5 5 18 5
4 1 5 3 1 10 2
5 3 4 4 3 14 4
6 5 6 6 6 23 6
69
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Evaluation Criteria Paired Comparisons
1 2 3 4 5 6 SUM RANK
1 X 1 1 0 1 1 4 2
2 0 X 1 0 1 1 3 3
3 0 0 X 0 0 1 1 5
4 1 1 1 X 1 1 5 1
5 0 0 1 0 X 1 2 4
6 0 0 0 0 0 X 0 6
70
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Select the final vendor(s)

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
71
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Negotiate the final contract
  • No award
  • Single award
  • Multiple awards
  • Contract Management
  • deliverable dates
  • WBS
  • Regular status meetings
  • Types of Contracts
  • Fixed Price
  • Time and Materials
  • Retainer
  • Cost Plus
  • Discussion points for negotiating final
    contract
  • Final negotiation of contract

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
72
Discussion Points for Negotiating the Final
Contract
  • Work schedule
  • Payment schedule
  • Fees
  • Personnel assigned to the contract
  • Rights in data
  • Other terms and conditions
  • Ownership
  • Warranties
  • Cancellation terms

73
Final Contract Negotiation
  • Statement of work for the vendor
  • Terms and conditions
  • List of deliverables, schedule, and budget
  • Defined acceptance process, including acceptance
    criteria
  • Identification of the project and supplier
    representatives responsible and authorized to
    agree to changes to the vendor agreement
  • Description of the process for handling
    requirements change requests from either side
  • The processes, procedures, guidelines, methods,
    templates, and so on that will be followed
  • Critical dependencies between the project and the
    vendor

74
Final Contract Negotiation
  • Descriptions of the form, frequency, and depth of
    project oversight that the vendor can expect from
    the project, including the evaluation criteria to
    be used in monitoring the vendors performance
  • Clear definition of the vendors responsibilities
    for ongoing maintenance and support of the
    acquired products
  • Identification of the warranty, ownership, and
    usage rights for the acquired products

75
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Expectation setting
  • For whom does the vendor work?
  • What is expected of the vendor?
  • What tools and facilities are available to
  • the vendor?
  • What training is available to the vendor?
  • What must the vendor deliver?
  • When must it be produced?
  • Who will receive the deliverables?
  • How will the deliverables be evaluated?

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
76
Vendor Management
  • You should make the vendor feel like an equal
    partner in the project.
  • That means including them in every team activity
  • Communication needs to be established early among
    all relevant stakeholders
  • Conducting meetings and having face-to-face
    discussions are the easiest and best ways to set
    clear expectations and gain a mutual
    understanding of the requirements and expected
    performance.

77
Ch02 Project Life Cycle Processes
Procurement Management Life Cycle
Vendor Solicitation
  • Monitor Progress and Performance
  • Monitor Requirements Change Requests
  • Monitoring the Performance of Standard
  • Project Activities
  • Labor hours
  • Cost (Earned Value)
  • Schedule (Earned Value)
  • Frequency of change requests over time
  • Incidence of bugs
  • Risks
  • Issue resolution
  • Staffing levels and changes by position
  • Transition form Vendor to Client

Vendor Evaluation
Vendor Selection
Vendor Contracting
Vendor Management
78
Monitoring the Performance of Standard Project
Activities
  • key metrics need to be provided by the vendor to
    track actual versus planned contract performance
  • Labor hours
  • Cost
  • Schedule
  • Other performance metrics that should be tracked
    by both the vendor and the project manager
    include the following
  • Frequency of change requests over time
  • Incidence of bugs
  • Risks
  • Issues resolution
  • Staffing levels and changes by position type

79
POS
  • The POS is a short document (ideally one page)
    that concisely states what is to be done in the
    project, why it is to be done, and what business
    value it will provide to the enterprise when
    completed.

80
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Purpose of the Project Overview Statement
A one-page description that is
  • A general statement of the project
  • A reference for the planning team
  • A decision aid for the project
  • To get management approval to plan the project

81
POS
  • The POS can serve other purposes as well
  • Inherited Project
  • Briefing Tool

82
Inherited Project
  • Sometimes you inherit a project.
  • In these instances, the project has been defined
    and scoped. A budget, staff resources, and a
    completion date have also been determined.
  • In this scenario, do you write a POS? Yes!
  • Why? Two reasons
  • to become familiar with and understand the
    project as well as the clients and managements
    expectations.
  • the POS will become the referent for the planning
    team.

83
Briefing Tool
  • To give your team briefing information on the
    project.

84
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Contents of the Project Overview Statement
85
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Example POS
86
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Problem/Opportunity
A problem needing resolution or an untapped
business opportunity. A statement of fact that
everyone would agree to. It stands on its
own. This is the foundation on which the
proposed project will be based.
87
POS Problem/Opportunity
  • Examples of situations that will lead to a
    statement of the problem or opportunity
  • Known Problem or Opportunity
  • Client Request
  • Corporate Initiative.
  • Mandated Requirements

88
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Project Goal
A one or two sentence statement of how you
intend to address the stated problem/opportunity.
A scoping statement that bounds the project you
are proposing.
89
POS Project Goal
  • A project has one goal
  • it defines the final deliverable or outcome of
    the project in clear terms so that everyone
    understands what is to be accomplished.
  • The goal statement must not contain any language
    or terminology that might not be understandable
    to anyone having occasion to read it.
  • the goal statement is short and to the point.
  • you do not control the start date and therefore
    you cannot possibly know the end date. Your
    objective
  • is to postpone giving any fixed duration or
    completion date until you have completed the
    project plan.

90
POS Project Goal
  • S.M.A.R.T. characteristics provide the following
    criteria for a goal statement1
  • SpecificBe specific in targeting an objective.
  • Measurable Establish measurable indicators of
    progress.
  • Assignable Make the object assignable to one
    person for completion.
  • Realistic State what can realistically be done
    with available resources.
  • Time-related State when the objective can be
    achievedthat is, the duration.

91
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Project Objectives
  • 5 or 6 brief statements that further
  • bound your project goal statement.
  • From these statements it is clear what
  • is in and not in the proposed project.
  • These statements might identify major
  • project deliverables.
  • These statements form a necessary and
  • sufficient set of objectives.

92
  • An objective statement should contain the
    following four parts
  • An outcome A statement of what is to be
    accomplished.
  • A time frame A preliminary estimate of duration.
  • A measure Metrics that will measure success.
  • An action How the objective will be met.

93
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Project Success Criteria
IRACIS IR Increase Revenue AC Avoid
Costs IS Improve Service
Use quantitative metrics only! How much and by
when?
Example This reengineering project is expected
to reduce order entry to order fulfillment cycle
time by 6 percent.
94
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Assumptions, Risks and Obstacles
  • Technological
  • New to the company
  • Obsolescence
  • Environmental
  • Management change
  • Staff turnover
  • Interpersonal
  • Working relationships
  • Cultural
  • Fit to the company
  • Causal Relationships
  • Will the solution solve the problem

95
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
POS Attachments
  • Risk Analysis
  • Financial Analyses
  • Feasibility studies
  • Cost/benefit analysis
  • Breakeven analysis
  • Return on investment

96
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Gaining Approval to Plan the Project
  • Expected Review Questions from Management
  • How important is the problem or opportunity to
    the organization?
  • How is the project related to our CSFs?
  • Does the goal statement related directly to the
    problem or opportunity?
  • Are the objectives clear representations of the
    goal statement?
  • Is there sufficient business value as measured by
    the success criteria to warrant further
    expenditures on this project?
  • Is the relationship between the project
    objectives and the success criteria clearly
    established?
  • Are the risks too high and the business value too
    low?
  • Can senior management mitigate the identified
    risks?

97
Ch03 How to Scope a Project
Participants in the Approval Process
  • Core project team (managers, the professionals,
    and perhaps the client)
  • Project team (review the POS before submitting it
    to upper management.)
  • Project manager
  • Resource managers
  • Function/process managers
  • Client
  • Senior management

98
Project Approval Status
  • Senior management may not be ready or willing to
    give their approval to plan the project
  • They may reject the proposal out of hand. (based
    on a comparison of expected benefits versus total
    cost coupled with a time frame as to when the
    benefits will be realized.
  • They may request a recalibration of the goal and
    scope of the project followed by a resubmission
  • They might decide that a later resubmission is in
    order. (they are not ready to commit to the
    project at this time)
  • The approval may be associated with a
    consideration to add the project to the
    organizations project portfolio.
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