Intro to Microbiology - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Intro to Microbiology


1
Stress Test
The slower the pictures move, the better your
ability of handling stress. Alleged criminals
that were tested see them spinning around madly
however, senior citizens and small children see
them standing still. None of these images are
animated - they are perfectly static.
2
(No Transcript)
3
Intro to Microbiology
  • Microbiology 2314

4
Microbes in our Lives
  1. Microorganisms are Small
  2. Assist in Maintaining an Ecological Balance
  3. Normal Microbiota Exist in Organisms
  4. Important in Food Production
  5. Important in Chemical Production
  6. Can Serve as Pathogens

5
Types of Microbiology / Bacteriology
6
Bacilli Bacteria
7
Shapes and Arrangements of Bacteria
8
Mycology
9
(No Transcript)
10
Parasitology / Parasitic Protozoa and Helminths
Hookworm and Whipworm Eggs
11
Amoeba
12
New Studies
  • AIDS
  • Action of Interferons
  • Development of Vaccines
  • Healing Ability of Phages
  • EIDs
  • Biological Terrorism

13
Renewed Interest since 9-11 in combating
Biological Bio-terrorism
14
New Techniques
  • Molecular Biology
  • Electron Microscopy
  • Recombinant DNA Technology
  • Stem Cell Research

15
Diversity of Microbes / Bacteria
  • Unicellular
  • Prokaryotic
  • Shapes
  • Cell Wall of Peptidoglycan
  • Binary Fission
  • Flagella
  • Varied Nutrition

16
(No Transcript)
17
Binary Fission of Bacillus
18
Gram - Bacilli and Gram Cocci
19
Fungi
  1. Mushrooms, Molds, Yeasts
  2. Eukaryotic
  3. Usually Multicellular with Yeasts being
    Unicellular
  4. Decomposers
  5. Organic Absorption

20
(No Transcript)
21
(No Transcript)
22
Protozoa
  1. Unicellular
  2. Eukaryotic
  3. Classified by Locomotion
  4. Nutrition is by Absorption and Ingestion

23
Paramecium
24
(No Transcript)
25
Amoeba
26
Algae
  1. Unicellular or Multicellular
  2. Photosynthesis
  3. Producers

27
Kelp Forrest Kelp is a Type of Algae
28
Viruses
  1. Noncellular
  2. Parasites
  3. Nucleic Acid Core
  4. Protein Coat
  5. Envelope
  6. Nonliving

29
Multicellular Parasites / Helminthes Flatworms
and Roundworms
30
Microbes and Human Welfare
31
Decomposition of Organic Matter
32
Bioremediation of Toxic Wastes
33
Biological Controls
In quarantine tests, potential biological pests
are confined in small cages containing test
plants sprayed with different microbiological
control agents.
34
Biotechnology
The application of biological knowledge and
techniques to develop products
A potential product from guano microorganisms is
an enzyme called chitinase, a protein capable of
converting the chitin exoskeleton of insects and
crustaceans to simpler sugars. This, in turn, may
be used for alcohol fuel production. Another
potential use for chitinase producing
microorganisms is the biological control of
insect and nematode pests.
35
Genetic Engineering / Gene Therapy
Using bacteria of genus Clostridium to
selectively penetrate cancer tumors and deliver
gene therapy to shrink an kill the tumors. In
gene therapy, viruses are used to carry
replacements for defective or missing genes into
human cells
Chest Tumor
36
Microbes and Human Disease
  • Normal Microbiota or Flora
  • Pathogenicity and Susceptibility
  • Infectious Diseases Invade Hosts
  • EIDs are Increasing

37
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • We study microbiology because bacteria, viruses
    and fungi are the leading cause of death in the
    history of mankind.
  • Bacteria, viruses and fungi have been responsible
    for the downfall of governments, famine, and
    death on an almost incalculable scale.
  • It has only been in the last one hundred years
    that we have finally begun to win the age old
    battle with these small and deadly bugs.

38
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Many microorganisms are involved in the
    production of food or are directly edible.
  • - The presence of bacteria (normal flora) in our
    bodies inhibits the growth of potentially
    pathogenic bacteria helping to keep us
    healthy..

39
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Modern biotechnology is often associated
    with the use of genetically altered
    microorganisms such as E. coli or yeast for the
    production of substances like synthetic insulin
    or antibiotics.
  • - Biotechnological advances in agriculture also
    require the help of microorganisms to form
    Transgenic Plant with increased yield, reduced
    vulnerability to environmental and pathogenic
    stresses, and improved taste.

40
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Microbes are involved in cycling vital
    elements such as carbon and nitrogen, breaking
    down wastes and dead organisms into simpler
    substances plants can use in photosynthesis.
    Other species are at the base of the food chain,
    especially in aquatic ecosystems. Even pathogens
    have a role in controlling the populations of
    their host species. Microbes are even used to
    digest oil from oil spills.
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Intro to Microbiology

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Title: Intro to Microbiology Author: Sherry Meeks Last modified by: Department of Biology Created Date: 8/26/2002 9:08:26 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Intro to Microbiology


1
Stress Test
The slower the pictures move, the better your
ability of handling stress. Alleged criminals
that were tested see them spinning around madly
however, senior citizens and small children see
them standing still. None of these images are
animated - they are perfectly static.
2
(No Transcript)
3
Intro to Microbiology
  • Microbiology 2314

4
Microbes in our Lives
  1. Microorganisms are Small
  2. Assist in Maintaining an Ecological Balance
  3. Normal Microbiota Exist in Organisms
  4. Important in Food Production
  5. Important in Chemical Production
  6. Can Serve as Pathogens

5
Types of Microbiology / Bacteriology
6
Bacilli Bacteria
7
Shapes and Arrangements of Bacteria
8
Mycology
9
(No Transcript)
10
Parasitology / Parasitic Protozoa and Helminths
Hookworm and Whipworm Eggs
11
Amoeba
12
New Studies
  • AIDS
  • Action of Interferons
  • Development of Vaccines
  • Healing Ability of Phages
  • EIDs
  • Biological Terrorism

13
Renewed Interest since 9-11 in combating
Biological Bio-terrorism
14
New Techniques
  • Molecular Biology
  • Electron Microscopy
  • Recombinant DNA Technology
  • Stem Cell Research

15
Diversity of Microbes / Bacteria
  • Unicellular
  • Prokaryotic
  • Shapes
  • Cell Wall of Peptidoglycan
  • Binary Fission
  • Flagella
  • Varied Nutrition

16
(No Transcript)
17
Binary Fission of Bacillus
18
Gram - Bacilli and Gram Cocci
19
Fungi
  1. Mushrooms, Molds, Yeasts
  2. Eukaryotic
  3. Usually Multicellular with Yeasts being
    Unicellular
  4. Decomposers
  5. Organic Absorption

20
(No Transcript)
21
(No Transcript)
22
Protozoa
  1. Unicellular
  2. Eukaryotic
  3. Classified by Locomotion
  4. Nutrition is by Absorption and Ingestion

23
Paramecium
24
(No Transcript)
25
Amoeba
26
Algae
  1. Unicellular or Multicellular
  2. Photosynthesis
  3. Producers

27
Kelp Forrest Kelp is a Type of Algae
28
Viruses
  1. Noncellular
  2. Parasites
  3. Nucleic Acid Core
  4. Protein Coat
  5. Envelope
  6. Nonliving

29
Multicellular Parasites / Helminthes Flatworms
and Roundworms
30
Microbes and Human Welfare
31
Decomposition of Organic Matter
32
Bioremediation of Toxic Wastes
33
Biological Controls
In quarantine tests, potential biological pests
are confined in small cages containing test
plants sprayed with different microbiological
control agents.
34
Biotechnology
The application of biological knowledge and
techniques to develop products
A potential product from guano microorganisms is
an enzyme called chitinase, a protein capable of
converting the chitin exoskeleton of insects and
crustaceans to simpler sugars. This, in turn, may
be used for alcohol fuel production. Another
potential use for chitinase producing
microorganisms is the biological control of
insect and nematode pests.
35
Genetic Engineering / Gene Therapy
Using bacteria of genus Clostridium to
selectively penetrate cancer tumors and deliver
gene therapy to shrink an kill the tumors. In
gene therapy, viruses are used to carry
replacements for defective or missing genes into
human cells
Chest Tumor
36
Microbes and Human Disease
  • Normal Microbiota or Flora
  • Pathogenicity and Susceptibility
  • Infectious Diseases Invade Hosts
  • EIDs are Increasing

37
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • We study microbiology because bacteria, viruses
    and fungi are the leading cause of death in the
    history of mankind.
  • Bacteria, viruses and fungi have been responsible
    for the downfall of governments, famine, and
    death on an almost incalculable scale.
  • It has only been in the last one hundred years
    that we have finally begun to win the age old
    battle with these small and deadly bugs.

38
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Many microorganisms are involved in the
    production of food or are directly edible.
  • - The presence of bacteria (normal flora) in our
    bodies inhibits the growth of potentially
    pathogenic bacteria helping to keep us
    healthy..

39
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Modern biotechnology is often associated
    with the use of genetically altered
    microorganisms such as E. coli or yeast for the
    production of substances like synthetic insulin
    or antibiotics.
  • - Biotechnological advances in agriculture also
    require the help of microorganisms to form
    Transgenic Plant with increased yield, reduced
    vulnerability to environmental and pathogenic
    stresses, and improved taste.

40
Why Do We Study Microorganisms?
  • Some Microorganisms Benefit Man
  • - Microbes are involved in cycling vital
    elements such as carbon and nitrogen, breaking
    down wastes and dead organisms into simpler
    substances plants can use in photosynthesis.
    Other species are at the base of the food chain,
    especially in aquatic ecosystems. Even pathogens
    have a role in controlling the populations of
    their host species. Microbes are even used to
    digest oil from oil spills.
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