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Title: Literacy Plan/Profile for Middle and High School Students Resources available on www.MissionLiteracy.com


1
Literacy Plan/Profile for Middle and High School
StudentsResources available on
www.MissionLiteracy.com
  • Dr. Elaine Weber, Macomb ISD
  • Susan Codere Kelly, MDE
  • Diane Berg, Independent Consultant
  • Tesha Thomas, Macomb ISD

2
"What are we, as educators, going to do to
change our system to meet our students' needs?"
That is probably one of the biggest shifts any
organization can make.An Educator
3
Building a High School Literacy Plan "What are
we, as educators, going to do to change our
system to meet our
students' needs?" That is probably one of the
biggest shifts any organization can make.
4
What do you know about your students literacy
skills?
  • At what level do they read?
  • How fluent is their writing and reading?
  • How well do they comprehend text?
  • Can they analyze text for craft, perspective,
    point of view or bias?
  • Can they read closely and critically?
  • Can they read and write argument?

5
What plans do you have for your students
literacy skill development?
  • Do you know what they need?
  • Do you know where to begin in the development
    process?
  • Do you have a system for monitoring their
    literacy development progress?
  • Do your students have a system for knowing their
    own literacy progress?

6
The Plan for this Session
  • Review the Comprehensive Plan and
    how it can help you find out where your
    students are.
  • Identify fundamental literacy skills that define
    your students and learn about resources to assess
    those skills.
  • Learn how skills will be assessed using MS/HS
    SBAC performance task samples.

7
Sample Literacy Plans
Tools for developing Literacy Plans that grow
basic Literacy Skills and meet the ELA/Literacy
Common Core State Standards
The 4 questions of Close and Critical
Reading What does the text say? How does the
text say it? What does the text mean? What does
the text mean to me?
The Cognitive Rigor Matrix
Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium Models and
Rubrics
ELA/Literacy Common Core State Standards
Assessments Scaffolding
Comprehensive Literacy Plan for a
Classroom, Department, School, or
District Student Literacy Profiles
8
Literacy Plan
  • With an elbow partner review the plan
  • In what areas do you have data on your students?
  • Are there areas where you do not have data on
    your students?
  • What are some areas where you would consider
    collecting data?

9
Sample Literacy Plan School ABC
Literacy Initiative Plan AMENDED
Initiative Department(s) Overview Timeline Point Person(s) Responsible Goals
Writing Tracker Persuasive Writing -Science -Social Studies -Mathematics English Writing tracker to develop fluency Students will -Write fluently in Math -Track the number of words and domain specific language -Write a certain number of writes per semester (as decided by department -Complete a reflection sheet on writing per semester Intensive focus/mastery level instruction to revise essays according to the ACT writing rubric up to a 4 Review Tracker writings Sept Set up folders Reflection at the end of semester March Set up folders Retest with prompt at the end of January and continued to March 5 Chairs of Social Studies, Science Mathematics Departments Teacher Develop fluency skills Up to 150 wp five minutes HS and 125 MS Promising students writing minimally a 4 essay
ACT /MME Initiative Math December ACT math assessment 30 promising students will receive intensive mastery level teaching/learning episodes in Cabin and designated class. Analyze Test results for personalize teaching They will be retested at the end of January Now until March 5 Teacher Prepare at least 20 students for the challenges of the ACT mathematics assessment
Guided Highlighting Guided Highlighted reading for Science Items on the ACT Science Assessment ELA Students will -9th,10th , 11th Grades Complete two of each genres (prose fiction, natural science, social science, humanities) per year ACT preparation 11th Grade students receive 5 of each of the four genres with GHR before March Guided Highlighted Reading for the items on the ACT Science Assessment (Should we assess the students on the Science part of the test to determine specific needs???????) Sept Grade 11 students assessed on the ACT-like reading portion of the assessment Feb Grade 11 re-assessed on reading portion of the ACT-like test Sept Teachers select the passages they will use for each of the grade levels As it is appropriate to prepare students for ACT Science Committee Science Chair Develop Reading fluency and build reading stamina to prepare for the ACT reading assessment Prepare Promising students for the ACT Science Assessment
MME Social Studies Geography and World History Close and Critical Reading Work Keys Social Studies -Art -Performing Arts -Foreign Language -PE/Health Career Education Intensive focused /mastery teaching and learning Students will -Use the CCR Protocol to analyze content specific items (i.e. articles, songs, paintings) -Write out answers using the protocol or discuss the answers to the protocol questions using a Socratic method -Complete a reflection sheet Mastery level focused teaching/learning on Work Keys Next 5 weeks the 11th students will receive an intensive course in Geography and World History -Teachers will receive training on the four CCR questions, see examples of how to use the protocol, and see the connections to the CCSS. -Teachers will complete three CCR protocols throughout each course. Teachers will turn in student samples of each CCR. Teacher Chairs of the electives and encore subjects School Improvement Chair Prepare promising students for Social Studies portion of the MME Develop Close and Critical Reading/Thinking/Writing Skills Meet CCSS Reading Standards 1 9 Goal????
10
Student Literacy Profile
  • With your table partners, discuss the Student
    Literacy Profile.
  • Which items will you include for your students
    profiles?
  • Which items would you consider adding?
  • Which literacy skills do your students monitor,
    but are not included on the list?

11
Middle and High School Student Literacy
Profile Name______________________________________
_______ Grade_____________
Fall Winter Spring
Reading Grade Level Grade _____ Grade _____ Grade _____
Reading Fluency Grade __ Words ___ Rubric ____ Grade __ Words __ Rubric ____ Grade __ Words ___ Rubric ____
ACT Reading Score Score ____of 40 Score ____of 40 Score ____of 40
Close and Critical 1 Rubric Score ___/6 Rubric Score ___/6 Rubric Score ___/6
Close and Critical 2 Rubric Score ___/9 Rubric Score ___/9 Rubric Score ___/9
Close and Critical 3 Rubric Score ___/5 Rubric Score ___/5 Rubric Score ___/5
Close and Critical 4 Rubric Score ___/5 Rubric Score ___/5 Rubric Score ___/5
Profundity Score Score ____of 15 Score ____of 15 Score ____of 15
Identify Argument Score _____of 4 Score ____of 4 Score ____of 4
Writing
Writing Fluency of words _____ of words _____ of words_____
Argument Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4
Informative/Explanatory Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4
Narrative (Grade 6-8) Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4 Rubric Score ___/4
ACT Persuasive Writing ACT Rubric ___/6 ACT Rubric ___/6 ACT Rubric ___/6
Handwriting Speed and Legibility of letters____ Rubric Score ____/5 of letters Rubric Score ___/5 of letters Rubric Score ___/5
Language
Oral Language Rubric Score __/4 Rubric Score___/4 Rubric Score___/4
Word Study
Vocabulary of words ____ of words____ of words____
Spelling Stage _______ Stage _______ Stage_______
Grammar and Word Usage
ACT English Test Preparation North Dakota State University correct ____of 15 correct____ of 15 correct____ of 15
12
Reading Assessments
Reading Grade Level http//www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/eog/sampleitems/reading
Reading Fluency
ACT Reading Score
Close and Critical 1
Close and Critical 2
Close and Critical 3
Close and Critical 4
Profundity Score
Identify Argument
13
Reading Fluency Fluent readers read text
with appropriate automaticity (rate/speed and
accuracy)
  • Your Turn
  • Read the following excerpt silently for one
    minute and count the number of words you
    were able to read.
  • Record the number.
  • Summarize what you have read.
  • Share summary with a table partner.
  • Excerpt from Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan

14
Oral Reading Fluency (ORF) Target Rate Norms
Grade Fall(WCPM) Winter(WCPM) Spring(WCPM)
1234 30-6050-9070-110 10-3050-8070-10080-120 30-6070-10080-110100-140
5678 80-120100-140110-150120-160 100-140110-150120-160130-170 110-150120-160130-170140-180
Source Adapted from AIMSweb Charting the Path to Literacy, 2003, Edformation, Inc. Available at www.aimsweb.com/norms/reading_fluency.htm. Data are also adapted from Curriculum-Based Oral Flency Norms for Students in Grades 2 Through 5, by J. E. Hasbrouck and G. Tindal, 1992, Teaching Exceptional Children, 24, pp. 41-44.
15
  • Reading Fluency
  • Read the article for one minute.
  • 4-Strand DNA Structure Found in Cells
  • Count the words read.
  • Compare this rate to the previous rate.
  • What made this article more difficult to read?
  • Discuss the differences with your table
    partners.
  • .

16
FLUENCY RUBRIC Scores of 10 or more indicate
that the student is making good progress in
fluency. Score _________________ Scores at or
below 8 may indicate that the student needs
additional instruction in fluency.
1 2 3 4
Expression and Volume Reads in a quiet voice as if to get words out. The reading does not sound natural like talking to a friend. Reads in a quiet voice. The reading sounds natural in part of the text, but the reader does not always sound like they are talking to a friend. Reads with volume and expression. However, sometimes the reader slips into expressionless reading and does not sound like they are talking to a friend. Reads with varied volume and expression. The reader sounds like they are talking to a friend with their voice matching the interpretation of the passage.
Phrasing Reads word-by-word in a monotone voice. Reads in two or three word phrases, not adhering to punctuation, stress and intonation. Reads with a mixture of run-ons, mid sentence pauses for breath, and some choppiness. There is reasonable stress and intonation. Reads with good phrasing adhering to punctuation, stress and intonation.
Smoothness Frequently hesitates while reading, sounds out words, and repeats words or phrases. The reader makes multiple attempts to read the same passage. Reads with extended pauses or hesitations. The reader has many rough spots. Reads with occasional breaks in rhythm. The reader has difficulty with specific words and/or sentence structures. Reads smoothly with some breaks, but self-corrects with difficult words and/ or sentence structures.
Pace Reads slowly and laboriously. Reads moderately slowly. Reads fast and slow throughout reading. Reads at a conversational pace throughout the reading.
17
Four Essential Questions In Close
Critical Reading
  • What does it say?
  • How does the author say it?
  • What does it mean?
  • So what? Whats the connection to me?

http//4.bp.blogspot.com/_i-r2GCNVjWA/SWe7r5bnm9I/
AAAAAAAABDs/kJ-h594W4PU/S1600-R/deeply.png
18
Common Core Reading Anchor Reading Standards
  • Key Ideas and Details
  • 1. Read closely to determine what the text says
    explicitly and to make logical inferences from
    it cite specific textual evidence when writing
    or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the
    text.
  • 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text
    and analyze their development summarize the key
    supporting details and ideas.
  • 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and
    ideas develop and interact over the course of a
    text.

19
Assessment Grades 7-11 for CCR Question 1 What
does the text say? Directions Read the
following passage and write a summary. The
summary should include the following The
central idea and evidence, including key ideas,
to support conclusions drawn from the passage
  •  Freedman, Russell. Freedom Walkers The Story of
    the Montgomery Bus Boycott. New York Holiday
    House, 2006. (2006) From the Introduction Why
    They Walked
  •  
  • Not so long ago in Montgomery, Alabama, the
    color of your skin determined where you could sit
    on a public bus. If you happened to be an African
    American, you had to sit in the back of the bus,
    even if there were empty seats up front.
  •  
  • Back then, racial segregation was the rule
    throughout the American South. Strict lawscalled
    Jim Crow lawsenforced a system of white
    supremacy that discriminated against blacks and
    kept them in their place as second-class
    citizens.
  •  
  • People were separated by race from the moment
    they were born in segregated hospitals until the
    day they were buried in segregated cemeteries.
    Blacks and whites did not attend the same
    schools, worship in the same churches, eat in the
    same restaurants, sleep in the same hotels, drink
    from the same water fountains, or sit together in
    the same movie theaters.
  •  
  • In Montgomery, it was against the law for a
    white person and a Negro to play checkers on
    public property or ride together in a taxi.
  •  
  • Most southern blacks were denied their right to
    vote. The biggest obstacle was the poll tax, a
    special tax that was required of all voters but
    was too costly for many blacks and for poor
    whites as well. Voters also had to pass a
    literacy test to prove that they could read,
    write, and understand the U.S. Constitution.
    These tests were often rigged to disqualify even
    highly educated blacks. Those who overcame the
    obstacles and insisted on registering as voters
    faced threats, harassment. And even physical
    violence. As a result, African Americans in the
    South could not express their grievances in the
    voting booth, which for the most part, was closed
    to them. But there were other ways to protest,
    and one day a half century ago, the black
    citizens in Montgomery rose up in protest and
    united to demand their rightsby walking
    peacefully.
  •  
  • It all started on a bus.
  •  

20
Close and Critical Reading Question 1 What
does the text say? Summary Rubric
CC Reading Anchor Standards 3 Complete 2 Partial 1 Minimal Score
1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Reading Anchor 1 Response states what the text says explicitly. (3 points) makes logical inferences and cites specific textual evidence to support conclusions drawn from the text. (3 points) Reading Anchor 1 Response includes much of what the text says explicitly. (2 points) makes some logical inferences and cites general textual evidence to support some of the conclusions drawn from the text. (2 points) Reading Anchor 1 Response includes little of what the text says explicitly. (1 point) makes few logical inferences and gives little support drawn from the text. (1 point) __/6 pts.
2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Reading Anchor 2 Response summarizes using clearly identified central or main ideas. (3 points ) supports central ideas well with key details ideas from the text. (3 points) Reading Anchor 2 Response summarizes using partially or ineffectively identified central or main ideas. (2 points) supports central ideas with some details and ideas from the text. (2 points) Reading Anchor 2 Response summarizes using inaccurately identified central or main ideas. (1 point) supports central ideas with few details and ideas from the text. (1 point) __/6 pts. Total __/12pts.
21
Four Essential Questions In Close
Critical Reading
  • What does it say?
  • How does the author say it?
  • What does it mean?
  • So what? Whats the connection to me?

http//4.bp.blogspot.com/_i-r2GCNVjWA/SWe7r5bnm9I/
AAAAAAAABDs/kJ-h594W4PU/S1600-R/deeply.png
22
Common Core Reading Anchor Reading Standards
  • Craft and Structure
  • 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used
    in a text, including determining technical,
    connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze
    how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
  • 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how
    specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger
    portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter,
    scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the
    whole.
  • 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the
    content and style of a text.

23
Mining the Potential of Informational Text Craft
TEXT STRUCTURE TEXT STRUCTURE TEXT STRUCTURE TEXT STRUCTURE TEXT STRUCTURE
Genre Organization Point of View Tone/Mood Text Features
On-line article Essay Article (Internet, magazine) Newspaper (News, Feature, Editorial/Op Ed) Scholarly Articles(Science) Pamphlet Journal/Diary/Letter Memoir/Autobiography/ Biography Advertisement Eulogy Speech Thesis with proof Comparison/Contrast Cause/Effect Description/enumeration Chronological Date of publication Source(s) Expert/novice True/misleading Reliable Narrator Un-reliable Narrator Persuasive Argumentative Propagandistic Matter-of-fact/ straightforward Humorous Disdainful Informal/conversational Formal/academic Scholarly Pessimistic/Optimistic Biased Instructive/didactic Title (Question/statement) TOC/index Illustrations/pictures Heads/subheads Margin notes Font size Color White space Boldface Italics Parenthesis Forward, Dedication Footnotes Charts Illustrations Diagrams Appendix
AUTHORS CRAFT AUTHORS CRAFT
Imagery/Figures of Speech Writing Techniques
Simile Metaphor (extended) Personification Alliteration Onomatopoeia Allusion Satire/Parody Exaggeration/Hyperbole Irony/Sarcasm Repetition/Omission Symbolism Oxymoron Over-/Understatement Motif Intertextuality Language precise, scholarly, scientific, literary Catch lead (question) Show-not-tell Use of statistics Professional/scientific vocabulary/domain-specific/nomenclature (i.e. Latin and Greek) also foreign words Technical vocabulary Quoting experts, citing books, articles, journals Precise/detailed examples in proof Examples chosen for audience appeal/interest Explanation, description, definition, step-by-step how-to Varying sentence length and sentence structure Word Choice Punctuation for effect (ellipses, parenthesis, exclamation points, boldface, italics)


\ Weber, Schofield, Nelson Publication Fall
2011, Maupin House.
24
Assessments Grades 7-11 for CCR Question 2
How did the author write the text?Directions
Write a craft analysis for the following passage.
You may use the Mining Chart for Informational
Writing.
  • Freedman, Russell. Freedom Walkers The
    Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. New York
    Holiday House, 2006. (2006) From the
    Introduction Why They Walked
  •  
  • Not so long ago in Montgomery, Alabama, the
    color of your skin determined where you could sit
    on a public bus. If you happened to be an African
    American, you had to sit in the back of the bus,
    even if there were empty seats up front.
  •  
  • Back then, racial segregation was the rule
    throughout the American South. Strict lawscalled
    Jim Crow lawsenforced a system of white
    supremacy that discriminated against blacks and
    kept them in their place as second-class
    citizens.
  •  
  • People were separated by race from the moment
    they were born in segregated hospitals until the
    day they were buried in segregated cemeteries.
    Blacks and whites did not attend the same
    schools, worship in the same churches, eat in the
    same restaurants, sleep in the same hotels, drink
    from the same water fountains, or sit together in
    the same movie theaters.
  •  
  • In Montgomery, it was against the law for a
    white person and a Negro to play checkers on
    public property or ride together in a taxi.
  •  
  • Most southern blacks were denied their right to
    vote. The biggest obstacle was the poll tax, a
    special tax that was required of all voters but
    was too costly for many blacks and for poor
    whites as well. Voters also had to pass a
    literacy test to prove that they could read,
    write, and understand the U.S. Constitution.
    These tests were often rigged to disqualify even
    highly educated blacks. Those who overcame the
    obstacles and insisted on registering as voters
    faced threats, harassment. And even physical
    violence. As a result, African Americans in the
    South could not express their grievances in the
    voting booth, which for the most part, was closed
    to them. But there were other ways to protest,
    and one day a half century ago, the black
    citizens in Montgomery rose up in protest and
    united to demand their rightsby walking
    peacefully.
  •  
  • It all started on a bus.
  •  

25
Assessments for Freedom Walkers CCR Question 2
How does the author (text) say it?Directions
With your elbow partner, analyze the above text
for Writing Techniques (CCSS Reading Standard
5). Use the chart.
Writing Techniques
Catch lead (question) Show-not-tell Use of statistics Professional/scientific vocabulary/domain-specific/nomenclature (i.e. Latin and Greek) also foreign words Technical vocabulary Quoting experts, citing books, articles, journals Precise/detailed examples in proof Examples chosen for audience appeal/interest Explanation, description, definition, step-by-step how-to Varying sentence length and sentence structure Word Choice Punctuation for effect (ellipses, parenthesis, exclamation points, boldface, italics)

26
Rubric Close and Critical Reading Question
How does the text say it? Correlated with the
Common Core Reading Anchor Standards K-12
CC Anchor 3 Complete 2 Partial 1 Minimal Score
4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Reading Anchor 4 Response expertly interprets words and phrases as they are used in a text (technical, connotative, and figurative) and explains clearly how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. (Craft) Reading Anchor 4 Response interprets some words and phrases as they are used in a text (technical, connotative, and figurative) and partially explains how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. (Craft) Reading Anchor 4 Response interprets few words and phrases (technical, connotative, and figurative) and explains unclearly or incompletely how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. (Craft) __/3
5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Reading Anchor 5 Response expertly analyzes the structure/organization of text (how specific sentences, paragraphs, etc. relate to each other and the whole.) (Structure) Reading Anchor 5 Response includes some analysis of the structure/ organization of the text. (Structure) Reading Anchor 5 Response includes little analysis of the structure of the text. (Structure) __/3
6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Reading Anchor 6 Response expertly assesses how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Reading Anchor 6 Response does some assessment of how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. Reading Anchor 6 Response does little assessment of how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text. __/3
27
Depth of Thinking (Webb) Type of Thinking (Revised Bloom, 2001) DOK Level 1 Recall Reproduction DOK Level 2 Basic Skills Concepts DOK Level 3 Strategic Thinking Reasoning DOK Level 4 Extended Thinking
Remember -Recall, locate basic facts, definitions, details, events      
Understand -Select appropriate words for use when intended meaning is clearly evident -Specify, explain relationships -summarize identify central ideas     -Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence (quote, text evidence, example) -Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains or concepts
Apply -Use language structure (pre/suffix) or word relationships (synonym/antonym) to determine meaning Use context to identify word meanings -Obtain and interpret information using text features -Use concepts to solve non-routine problems -Devise an approach among many alternatives to research a novel problem
Analyze -Identify the kind of information contained in a graphic, table, visual, etc. Compare literary elements, facts, terms, events Analyze format, organization, text structures -Analyze or interpret authors craft (e.g., literary devices, viewpoint, or potential bias) to critique a text Analyze multiple sources or texts -Analyze complex/ abstract themes
Evaluate     Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for conjectures based on one text or problem -Evaluate relevancy, accuracy, completeness of information across texts/ sources  
Create -Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience -Develop a complex model for a given situation -Develop an alternative solution -Synthesize information across multiple sources or texts -Articulate a new voice, alternate theme, new knowledge or perspective
Your turn Determine where summary, and
craft fall on the Cognitive Rigor Matrix
28
A Snapshot of the Cognitive Rigor Matrix (Hess,
Carlock, Jones, Walkup, 2009)
Depth of Thinking (Webb) Type of Thinking (Revised Bloom, 2001) DOK Level 1 Recall Reproduction DOK Level 2 Basic Skills Concepts DOK Level 3 Strategic Thinking Reasoning DOK Level 4 Extended Thinking
Remember - Recall, locate basic facts, definitions, details, events
Understand - Select appropriate words for use when intended meaning is clearly evident - Specify, explain relationships - summarize identify central ideas - Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence (quote, text evidence, example) - Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains or concepts
Apply - Use language structure (pre/suffix) or word relationships (synonym/antonym) to determine meaning Use context to identify word meanings - Obtain and interpret information using text features - Use concepts to solve non-routine problems - Devise an approach among many alternatives to research a novel problem
Analyze - Identify the kind of information contained in a graphic, table, visual, etc. Compare literary elements, facts, terms, events Analyze format, organization, text structures - Analyze or interpret authors craft (e.g., literary devices, viewpoint, or potential bias) to critique a text Analyze multiple sources or texts - Analyze complex/ abstract themes
Evaluate Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for conjectures based on one text or problem - Evaluate relevancy, accuracy, completeness of information across texts/ sources
Create - Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience -Develop a complex model for a given situation -Develop an alternative solution -Synthesize information across multiple sources or texts -Articulate a new voice, alternate theme, new knowledge or perspective
29
Four Essential Questions In Close
Critical Reading
  • What does it say?
  • How does the author say it?
  • What does it mean?
  • So what? Whats the connection to me?

http//4.bp.blogspot.com/_i-r2GCNVjWA/SWe7r5bnm9I/
AAAAAAAABDs/kJ-h594W4PU/S1600-R/deeply.png
30
Common Core Reading Anchor Reading Standards
for Informational Text
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in
    diverse media and formats, including visually and
    quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and
    specific claims in a text, including the validity
    of the reasoning as well as the relevance and
    sufficiency of the evidence.
  • 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar
    themes or topics in order to build knowledge or
    to compare the approaches the authors take.

31
Levels of Meaning
Facts/Argument/Evidence Topics
Concepts Principles/Generalizations
Theory
  • Truth
  • Can be proven true
  • Evidence
  • Refers to a body of related facts/
  • evidence
  • Something you can learn about
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • A mental construct that frames a set of examples
    that share common attributes.
  • One or two words
  • Abstract and broad
  • Timeless
  • Universal
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Universal truths
  • Enduring understandings
  • Statements of conceptual relationship that
    transfer across examples
  • Ask the questions
  • How?
  • Why?
  • So what?
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Explanation of the nature or behavior of a
    specified set of phenomena based on the best
    evidence available (assumptions, accepted
    principles and procedures
  • Hypothesis/
  • Speculation based on considerable evidence in
    support of a formulated general principle
  • May change over time.
  • Synthesis

32
Assessment Grades 7-11 for CCR 3 What does the
text mean?
Freedman, Russell. Freedom Walkers The Story of
the Montgomery Bus Boycott. New York Holiday
House, 2006. (2006) From the Introduction Why
They Walked   Not so long ago in Montgomery,
Alabama, the color of your skin determined where
you could sit on a public bus. If you happened to
be an African American, you had to sit in the
back of the bus, even if there were empty seats
up front.   Back then, racial segregation was the
rule throughout the American South. Strict
lawscalled Jim Crow lawsenforced a system of
white supremacy that discriminated against blacks
and kept them in their place as second-class
citizens.   People were separated by race from
the moment they were born in segregated hospitals
until the day they were buried in segregated
cemeteries. Blacks and whites did not attend the
same schools, worship in the same churches, eat
in the same restaurants, sleep in the same
hotels, drink from the same water fountains, or
sit together in the same movie theaters.   In
Montgomery, it was against the law for a white
person and a Negro to play checkers on public
property or ride together in a taxi.   Most
southern blacks were denied their right to vote.
The biggest obstacle was the poll tax, a special
tax that was required of all voters but was too
costly for many blacks and for poor whites as
well. Voters also had to pass a literacy test to
prove that they could read, write, and understand
the U.S. Constitution. These tests were often
rigged to disqualify even highly educated blacks.
Those who overcame the obstacles and insisted on
registering as voters faced threats, harassment.
And even physical violence. As a result, African
Americans in the South could not express their
grievances in the voting booth, which for the
most part, was closed to them. But there were
other ways to protest, and one day a half century
ago, the black citizens in Montgomery rose up in
protest and united to demand their rightsby
walking peacefully.   It all started on a bus.
33
Assessment Freedom Walkers CCR 3 What does
the text mean?
  • Directions Use the Levels of Meaning chart.
    First, students identify the important ideas from
    the passage next, they list topics that organize
    the important ideas third, they consolidate the
    topics into concepts. The last two steps are to
    capture the concepts into an organizing principle
    or generalization and then formulate a theory
    (new knowledge).
  • Freedman, Russell. Freedom Walkers The Story of
    the Montgomery Bus Boycott. New York Holiday
    House, 2006. (2006)
  • From the Introduction Why They Walked

34
Facts/Argument/Evidence
  • Jim Crow lawsenforced a system of white
    supremacy that discriminated against blacks.
  •  
  • People were separated by race from the moment
    they were born in segregated hospitals until the
    day they were buried in segregated cemeteries.
  •  
  • In Montgomery, it was against the law for a white
    person and a Negro to play checkers on public
    property or ride together in a taxi.
  •  
  • Most southern blacks were denied their right to
    vote.
  •  
  • But there were other ways to protest.
  •  
  • Black citizens in Montgomery rose up in protest
    and united to demand their rightsby walking
    peacefully

35
Topics Concepts
  • Segregation
  • Protest
  • Civility
  •  Inequity
  • Power
  •   Majority
  •  
  • Jim Crow
  • Laws
  •  
  • Skin Color
  •  Voting rights
  •  
  • Black citizens
  •  
  • Race
  •  

36
Principles/Generalizations Theory
  • Segregation alienates victims and oppressors
    physically, legally, and socially.

Social and judicial laws created by an imbalance
of power produce inequities.  
37
Writing improves Reading Comprehension
Research over the past decade from Columbia and
Vanderbilt universities and the University of
Utah, among many others, concludes that, when
students improve the quantity and quality of
their writing, they improve in reading
comprehension, math, science, and social studies.
38
Nonfiction writing
  • There are no silver bullets in education. But
    writingparticularly nonfiction writingis about
    as close as you can get to a single strategy that
    has significant and positive effects in nearly
    every other area of the curriculum. Nonfiction
    writing is the backbone of a successful literacy
    and student achievement strategy.
  • Douglas B Reeves

39
Fluency (first)
  • An adequate level of fluency should be developed
    before moving to focus and form.
  • High School -- 125 150 words per 5 minutes
  • Middle School 100 --125 words per 5 minutes

40
Writing Tracker Chart the Progress
  • Record the topic
  • Record the date
  • Record the number of words
  • Record the domain-specific words

Writing Tracker
Progress Chart
Number of domain-specific words
Topic
Number of words
Date

41
Data Analyzer
  • Create a line graph with number of words and date
    and topic

250 200 150 100 50 0
1/20 1/23 1/27 1/31
2/4 2/7 2/ 11 2/13 2/15
state inventions oceans continents
wars cities
42
Writing Modes of Discourse
43
Common Core Anchor Standards for Writing
  1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis
    of substantive topics or texts using valid
    reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine
    and convey complex ideas and information clearly
    and accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
  3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined
    experiences or events using effective technique,
    well-chosen details and well-structured event
    sequences.

43
44
Common Core Distribution of Genre
Grade To Persuade To Explain To Convey Experience
4 30 35 35
8 35 35 30
12 40 40 20
45
School Wide Prompts
  • Beginning and end of school year
  • Argument
  • Provide students with facts that address both
    sides of an issue
  • Require students to take a stand
  • Smarter Balanced Example
  • Informative/Explanatory
  • Provide students with background text
  • Smarter Balanced Example

46
School Wide Prompts
  • Narrative
  • Middle School Prompts
  • MEAP Writing from Knowledge and Experience
  • High School Narrative techniques should be used
    to add voice to argument and informational
    writing pieces.

47
School Wide Prompts
  • What kind of grade level prompts could you
    create?
  • How would those prompts correlate with classroom
    instruction?
  • Work with a partner to come up with a prompt for
    argument, one for explanatory/ informational and
    one for narrative.

48
Scoring School Wide Prompts
49
Instructional Strategies
  • Mentor Texts
  • Traits Analysis
  • Rubric Analysis
  • They Say, I Say templates
  • Graphic Organizers

50
(No Transcript)
51
Argument vs. Persuasion
  • Argument A reasoned, logical way of
    demonstrating that the writers position, belief,
    or conclusion is valid. (EVIDENCE is used to
    prove a point.)
  • Persuasion The author uses emotional appeal
    and/or the character or credentials of the author
    to persuade the reader to believe what they say.

52
Persuasion Instructional Strategies
  • ACT Sample Prompts
  • ACT Scoring Guidelines
  • ACT Sample Essays Analysis
  • Timed practice sessions
  • Students graph scores

53
Writing in Response to Reading
  • Text Types and Purposes
  • 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine
    and convey complex ideas and information clearly
    and accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
  • 1. Write arguments to support claims in an
    analysis of substantive topics or texts, using
    valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient
    evidence.
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which
    the development, organization, and style are
    appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in
    diverse media and formats, including visually and
    quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and
    specific claims in a text, including the validity
    of the reasoning as well as the relevance and
    sufficiency of the evidence.
  • 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar
    themes or topics in order to build knowledge or
    to compare the approaches the authors take.


54
Close and Critical Reading of two or more texts
  • Your assignment
  • You will read two passages, We the People and
    Freedom Walkers, taking notes on these sources,
    and then write an informational essay explaining
    how the Ronald Reagan quotation applies to these
    articles.
  • Freedom is a fragile thing and is never more
    than one generation away from extinction. It is
    not ours by inheritance it must be fought for
    and defended constantly by each generation
  • Steps you will be following
  • In order to plan and write your essay, you will
    do all of the following
  • Read the two passages.
  • Answer three questions about the sources.
  • Plan and write your essay.

55
Performance Tasks ask students to write in
response to two or more texts
  • The Performance Tasks meet the CCSS Reading
    Anchor Standards that follow.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in
    diverse media and formats, including visually and
    quantitatively, as well as in words.
  • 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and
    specific claims in a text, including the validity
    of the reasoning as well as the relevance and
    sufficiency of the evidence.
  • 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar
    themes or topics in order to build knowledge or
    to compare the approaches the authors take.

56
  • The Performance Tasks meet the CCSS Writing
    Anchor Standards that follow.
  • Text Types and Purposes
  • 1. Write arguments to support claims in an
    analysis of substantive topics or texts, using
    valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient
    evidence.
  • 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to
    examine and convey complex ideas and information
    clearly and accurately
  • through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which
    the development, organization, and style are
    appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

57
A Snapshot of the Cognitive Rigor Matrix (Hess,
Carlock, Jones, Walkup, 2009)
Depth of Thinking (Webb) Type of Thinking (Revised Bloom, 2001) DOK Level 1 Recall Reproduction DOK Level 2 Basic Skills Concepts DOK Level 3 Strategic Thinking Reasoning DOK Level 4 Extended Thinking
Remember - Recall, locate basic facts, definitions, details, events
Understand - Select appropriate words for use when intended meaning is clearly evident - Specify, explain relationships - summarize identify central ideas - Explain, generalize, or connect ideas using supporting evidence (quote, text evidence, example) - Explain how concepts or ideas specifically relate to other content domains or concepts
Apply - Use language structure (pre/suffix) or word relationships (synonym/antonym) to determine meaning Use context to identify word meanings - Obtain and interpret information using text features - Use concepts to solve non-routine problems - Devise an approach among many alternatives to research a novel problem
Analyze - Identify the kind of information contained in a graphic, table, visual, etc. Compare literary elements, facts, terms, events Analyze format, organization, text structures - Analyze or interpret authors craft (e.g., literary devices, viewpoint, or potential bias) to critique a text Analyze multiple sources or texts - Analyze complex/ abstract themes
Evaluate Cite evidence and develop a logical argument for conjectures based on one text or problem - Evaluate relevancy, accuracy, completeness of information across texts/ sources
Create - Brainstorm ideas, concepts, problems, or perspectives related to a topic or concept -Generate conjectures or hypotheses based on observations or prior knowledge and experience -Develop a complex model for a given situation -Develop an alternative solution -Synthesize information across multiple sources or texts -Articulate a new voice, alternate theme, new knowledge or perspective
58
Middle and High School Student Writing about
Reading Assessment Profile Name_________________
________________ Grade_____________
Writing in Response to Reading Fall Winter Spring
Read for argument elements and write and argumentative essay Evaluate DOK 4 CCSS Reading Standard 8 CCSS Writing Standard 1 Grade ___ Rubric___ Grade ___ Rubric ___ Grade ___ Rubric ___
Read/View/Listen to integrate and evaluate and write informative/explanatory essay Evaluate DOK 4 Analyze DOK 4 CCSS Reading Standard 7 CCSS Writing Standard 2 Grade ___ Rubric ___ Grade ___ Rubric ___ Grade ___ Rubric ___
Analyze two or more texts for development of themes or topics or the approaches taken. Write a constructed response or an informative/explanatory essay Analyze DOK 4 CCSS Reading Standard 9 CCSS Writing Standard 4 Grade ___ Rubric ___ Grade ___ Rubric ___ Grade ___ Rubric ___
Close and Critical 1 CCSS Reading Standards 1, 2, 3 Understand DOK 2 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3
Close and Critical 2 CCSS Reading Standards 4, 5, 6 Analyze DOK 3 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3
Close and Critical 3 CCSS Reading Standards 7, 8, 9 Understand DOK 3 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3 Rubric Score ___/3
59
Writing about Reading Assessments
  • CCSS Reading Standard 7 Integrate and evaluate
    content presented in diverse media and formats,
    including visually and quantitatively, as well as
    in words.
  • CCSS Writing Standard 2 Write
    informative/explanatory texts to examine and
    convey complex ideas and information clearly and
    accurately through the effective selection,
    organization, and analysis of content.
  • Grades 7 - 9
  • Directions
  • You will read two passages, The Rise of the
    Robot Pet by Elena Soto and Love In the Time of
    Robots by Frank Mullin, and view three videos,
    taking notes on these sources.
  • Your Assignment
  • Your class is writing articles for the school
    newspaper on robotic pets. Write an informational
    essay sharing what you have learned from your
    research on robotic pets (the two articles and
    three videos), and also explain how the different
    media provided the information.
  • How your essay will be scored Your essay will be
    scored using the
  • SBAC 4-point Informative-Explanatory (Grades
    6-11) Writing Rubric

60
Writing about Reading Assessments
  • CCSS Reading Standard 8 Delineate and
    evaluate the argument and specific claims in a
    text, including the validity of the reasoning as
    well as the relevance and sufficiency of the
    evidence.
  • CCSS Writing Standard 1 Write arguments to
    support claims in an analysis of substantive
    topics or texts, using valid reasoning and
    relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Grades 7 - 9
  • Directions
  • You will read two passages, The Rise of the
    Robot Pet by Elena Soto and Love In the Time of
    Robots by Frank Mullin and view three videos
    taking notes on these sources.
  • Your Assignment
  • Remember, your school is planning a technology
    fair for which one category of entries is writing
    about technology. Write an argumentative essay to
    make a claim for or against robotic pets. Your
    essay can be read by students, teachers, and
    community members who attend the technology fair.
    Support your claim with details from what you
    have read and viewed.
  • How your essay will be scored Your essay will be
    scored using the
    SBAC 4-point Argumentative (6-11) Writing Rubric

61
Writing about Reading Assessments
  • CCSS Reading Standard 9 Analyze how two or
    more texts address similar themes or topics in
    order to build knowledge or to compare the
    approaches the authors take.
  • CCSS Writing Standard 4 Produce clear and
    coherent writing in which the development,
    organization, and style are appropriate to task,
    purpose, and audience.
  • Grades 7 - 9
  • Directions
  • You will read two passages, The Rise of the
    Robot Pet by Elena Soto and Love In the Time of
    Robots by Frank Mullin and view three videos
    taking notes on these sources.
  • Your Assignment
  • Write a constructed response explaining how the
    five resources build knowledge about robotic
    pets. Use evidence from the resources provided.
  • Or
  • Your Assignment
  • Write a constructed response explaining how
    different authors approach the topic in different
    ways. Use evidence from the resources provided.
  • Scoring The constructed responses will be scored
    using the SBAC 3-point constructed response
    rubric.

62
Sample Assessment for other grade levels
  • High School Mexican Grey Wolves
    Grades 10 to 12

63
Common Core Vocabulary Anchor Standards
  • Language Vocabulary Acquisition and Use
  • L4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown
    and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using
    context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts,
    and consulting general and specialized reference
    materials, as appropriate.
  • L5. Demonstrate understanding of word
    relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • L6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general
    academic and domain-specific words and phrases
    sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and
    listening at the college and career readiness
    level demonstrate independence in gathering
    vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or
    phrase important to comprehension or expression.

64
Vocabulary Self-Awareness Chart Name_____________

Class______________
WORD ? ? EXAMPLE DEFINITION










Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil. Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil. Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil. Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil. Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil. Directions Examine the list of words you have written in the first column Put a next to each word you know well, and give an accurate example and definition of the word. Your definition and example must relate to the unit of study. Place a ? next to any words for which you can write only a definition or an example, but not both. Place a ? next to words that are new to you. You will use this chart throughout the unit. By the end of the unit should have the entire chart completed. Because you will be revising this chart, write in pencil.
65
Tiers of Words
  • Isabel L. Beck, Margaret G. McKeown, and Linda
    Kucan (2002, 2008) have outlined a useful model
    for conceptualizing categories of words readers
    encounter in texts and for understanding the
    instructional and learning challenges that words
    in each category present.
  • Tier One words are the words of everyday speech
    usually learned in the early grades, albeit not
    at the same rate by all children.
  • Tier Two words are general academic words that
    appear usually in text and in all content areas.
  • Tier Three are domain specific words and are
    usually taught within the content area.

66
Academic Vocabulary List by Jim Burke
  • The Academic Vocabulary List has been
    categorized by parts of speech or in other
    words, into grammatical categories or word
    groups. By Rick Smith.
  • Find this list on www.missionliteracy.com

67
Jim Burkes Vocabulary Squares
Word Word
Part(s) of Speech     Variations, Synonyms, Antonyms
Symbol, Logo, Icon Definition(s)    
Sentence       Sentence      
68
More literacy assessments
  • Profundity for Reading Fiction
  • Handwriting
  • Oral Language
  • Word Study
  • Spelling
  • Grammar and Word Usage
  • Grammar of the ACT and ELA CCSS
  •  

69
LiveBinders
  • www.livebinders.com
  • Search MISD
  • Macomb Comprehensive Literacy Plan
  • Management
  • Reading
  • Writing

70
Thank You Contact Us
  • Dr. Elaine Weber eweber_at_misd.net
  • Susan Codere Kelly CodereS_at_michigan.gov
  • Diane Berg dougndiane_at_comcast.net
  • Tesha Thomas tthomas_at_misd.net
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