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New Hampshire SIG Intervention Models Webinar: Transformation and Turnaround

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Title: New Hampshire SIG Intervention Models Webinar: Transformation and Turnaround


1
New Hampshire SIG Intervention Models Webinar
Transformation and Turnaround
200 pm 400 pm Tuesday, March 16,
2010
  • Presented by
  • New Hampshire Department of Education
  • New England Comprehensive Center at RMC Research

We will begin in a few minutes. All phones
are muted when you join. Send a CHAT message to
the Host if you have a request or question. For
technical problems, call Karen Laba, NECC, at 603
969-0988.
2
Welcome!
  • Introductions Presenters, Host
  • Kathleen Murphy, Director, Division of
    Instruction
  • Stephanie Lafreniere, Title I Director
  • Joey Nichol, Title I and School Improvement
  • Karen Laba, New England Comprehensive Center
  • Participants

3
WebEx Pointers
  • You will be muted during the session unless
    otherwise indicated.
  • If you have a question or a request, type it into
    the CHAT box in the lower right hand corner of
    your screen
  • select the recipient (dropdown box) and
  • click SEND (Note you can chat privately with the
    host or publicly with ALL PARTICIPANTS using the
    dropdown list)
  • If you get disconnected, first try logging off
    the internet and then re-entering you can stay
    connected via phone while waiting to reconnect to
    the web.
  • If you cant resolve the problem, call Karens
    cell phone at (603 969-0988) to talk with someone
    who maybe able to help get you reconnected.

4
Goals of the Session
  • Examine the details of the transformation and
    turnaround SIG intervention models
  • Discuss examples of implementation strategies
    from existing research on dramatically improving
    schools
  • Consider additional strategies suitable for NH
    schools

5
SIG Overview
  • What?
  • School Improvement Grant Funds through Title I,
    Part A of ESEA, section 1003(g)
  • Formula to states, by application to LEAs
  • For whom?
  • New Hampshire-defined eligible, per US ED
    guidance
  • Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III (see later slides)

6
SIG Overview, contd.
  • How much?
  • For how long?
  • To do what?

7
NH Priority Schools Tier I
  • (i) Is among the lowest-achieving five percent ,
    or five (whichever is greater) of Title I schools
    in improvement, corrective action, or
    restructuring in the State or
  • (ii) Is a high school that has had a graduation
    rate as defined in 34 C.F.R. 200.19(b) that is
    less than 60 percent over a number of years or
  • (iii) Is Title I-eligible and is no higher
    achieving than the highest-achieving school in
    (i) above. Additionally, the school must be
    either in the bottom 20 percent of all schools in
    the state, or has not made Adequate Yearly
    Progress (AYP) for 2 consecutive years. The
    guidance defines Title I-eligible as either a
    school currently receiving Title I funds or a
    school eligible for, but not receiving funds.

8
NH Priority Schools Tier II
  • (i) Is Title I-eligible and is within the
    lowest-achieving five percent of high schools or
    the five lowest-achieving, whichever number is
    greater or
  • (ii) Is a high school that has had a graduation
    rate as defined in 34 C.F.R. 200.19(b) that is
    less than 60 percent over a number of years.

9
NH Priority Schools Tier III
  • (i) Is a Title I school in improvement,
    corrective action, or restructuring that did not
    meet the Tier I criteria, OR
  • (ii) Is a Title I-eligible school that does not
    meet the Tier I or Tier II requirements and is in
    the bottom 20 percent of all schools in the state
    or has not made AYP for any two years.

10
SIG Application Priority System
  • If an LEA has one or more . . . the LEA must
    include
  • Tier I, Tier II, and Tier III schools
  • Each Tier I school it has capacity to serve at a
    minimum, at least one Tier I school OR at least
    one Tier II school
  • Tier I and Tier II schools, but no Tier III
    schools
  • Each Tier I school it has capacity to serve at a
    minimum, at least one Tier I school OR at least
    one Tier II school
  • Tier I and III schools, but no Tier II schools
  • Each Tier I school it has capacity to serve at a
    minimum, at least one Tier I school
  • Tier II and Tier III schools, but no Tier I
    schools
  • The LEA has the option to commit to serve as many
    Tier II and Tier III schools as it wishes
  • Tier I schools only
  • Each Tier I school it has capacity to serve
  • Tier II schools only
  • The LEA has the option to commit to serve as many
    Tier II schools as it wishes
  • Tier III schools only
  • The LEA has the option to commit to serve as many
    Tier III schools as it wishes
  • The number of Tier I schools an LEA has
    capacity to serve may be zero if, and only if,
    the LEA is using all of the capacity it would
    otherwise use to serve its Tier I schools in
    order to serve Tier II schools.

11
NH SIG Timeline
  • February 26
  • NH DOE submitted SIG application to USED
    response/ approval expected mid-March
  • April 2nd
  • LEA intent to apply and planning grant request
    due to the NH DOE
  • April 5th - 9th
  • NH DOE review and approval of LEA planning grant
  • May 7th
  • Complete LEA application due to the NH DOE
  • May 10th 26th
  • Three step application review
  • May 31st
  • LEA grants awarded by the NH DOE
  • June 1st Sept. 7th
  • LEA begins implementation of grant and
    intervention model

12
Questions or Comments
  • Raise your hand to be recognized
  • or
  • type a question or comment in the CHAT window

13
School Improvement Grant (SIG) Intervention
Models A webinar series prepared by the Center
on Innovation Improvement for use by the
regional comprehensive centers and state
education agencies to inform local education
agencies.
14
Dramatic School Improvement Models
14
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
15
DEFINITION TRANSFORMATION MODEL
15
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
16
Transforming Teachers and Leaders in NH HOW?
  • Replacing the principal
  • May retain if within previous 2 years-as part of
    a turnaround plan
  • Revising evaluation systems
  • NECC Regional Initiative
  • NH statewide model
  • Others?
  • Rewarding expert staff
  • Opportunity
  • Responsibility
  • Supporting staff
  • Mentoring, instructional coaches
  • Recruit, Place and Retain staff
  • Incentives
  • Opportunities

17
Transforming Instructional and Support
Strategies HOW?
  • Instructional model based on student needs
  • Student profile
  • Instructional audit
  • Match between student needs and model
  • Job embedded professional development
  • Teachers examining their practice
  • Sharing knowledge and skill
  • Continuous use of data to differentiate
    instruction
  • Reteach and enrich designs
  • Real-time classroom data, prompt intervention for
    learning gaps

18
Transforming Time and Supports Strategies HOW?
  • Increased learning time
  • Staff
  • Students
  • Community and family engagement
  • NH Parent Information Center
  • Media interactions
  • Community partners
  • Establish and nurture meaningful contributions

19
Transforming Governance HOW?
  • Flexibility
  • District responsibility
  • Providing school leadership with more autonomy
    district treating these schools differently
  • Within boundaries of contracted agreements
  • School responsibility
  • Thinking outside the box
  • Changing the way you do business
  • Ongoing technical assistance
  • Build District knowledge and skill
  • Identify effective vendors for specific services

20
THEORY OF ACTION
20
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
21
STRATEGIES COMPETENCIES OF A TRANSFORMATION/
TURNAROUND LEADER
21
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
22
STRATEGIES SUPPORT KEY LEADER ACTIONS
22
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
23
STRATEGIES CREATE CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS
23
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
Adapted from presentation by Carlas McCauley,
U.S. Department of Education for webinar series
hosted by CII and CCSSO. January 28, 2010.
24
STRATEGIES CREATE CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS
24
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
25
STRATEGIES TRANSFORMATION LEADER RECRUITMENT AND
SELECTION
25
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
26
STRATEGIES TRANSFORMATION LEADERS Who are They
and Where do we find Them?
26
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
27
Questions or Comments on the Transformation Model?
  • Raise your hand to be recognized
  • or
  • type a question or comment in the CHAT window

28
The Turnaround model
 
Lauren Morando Rhim LMR Consulting
March 2010
29
DEFINITION TURNAROUND MODEL
29
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
30
STRATEGIES HIRE BASED ON SPECIFIC ABILITIES
30
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
31
STRATEGIES SEEK TURNAROUND LEADERS WITH SPECIFIC
COMPETENCIES
31
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
32
STRATEGIES CREATE CONDITIONS FOR SUCCESS
32
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
33
TURNAROUND LEADER RECRUITMENT AND SELECTION
33
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
34
TURNAROUND LEADERS WHO ARE THEY AND WHERE DO WE
FIND THEM?
34
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
35
STRATEGIES LEVERAGE FOCUSED STAFF DISMISSALS
35
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
36
STRATEGIES STATE AND DISTRICT ROLE IN FOCUSED
STAFF DISMISSALS
36
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
37
STRATEGIES STAFF DISMISSAL PROCESS
37
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
38
STRATEGIES DISTRICT ROLE IN A TURNAROUND
38
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
39
PITFALLS TO AVOID
39
Prepared for NNSSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
40
Questions or Comments on the Turnaround Model?
  • Raise your hand to be recognized
  • or
  • type a question or comment in the CHAT window

41
Resources for NH Applicants
  • NH SIG LEA Application
  • (draft sent via email to districts final will
    posted upon US ED approval)
  • NH Eligible Schools List
  • (draft sent via email to districts final will
    posted upon US ED approval)
  • Handbook for Effective Implementation of School
    Improvement Grants http//www.centerii.org/handboo
    k/
  • US ED SIG Guidance Amended February 2, 2010
  • http//www2.ed.gov/programs/sif/faq.html

42
Future Information Sessions
  • Webinars
  • Thursday, March 18, 200 400 pm Topic
    Closure and Restart Models
  • Conference call/ In-Person Meeting
  • Friday, March 26, 900 1000 am
  • Topic General Q A
  • This meeting is for Superintendents

43
Thank you for joining us!
  • For additional information on NH SIG, please
    contact
  • Stephanie Lafreniere, Title I Director
  • Stephanie.lafreniere_at_ed.state.nh.us
  • 603-271-6052

44
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
44
  • Brinson, D., Rhim, L. (2009). Breaking the
    habit of low performance. Lincoln, IL Center on
    Innovation Improvement. Retrieved from
    http//www.centerii.org/survey
  • Brinson, D., Kowal, J., Hassel, B. (with Rhim,
    L., Valsing, E.). (2008). School turnarounds
    actions and results. Lincoln, IL Public Impact,
    Academic Development Institute. Retrieved from
    http//www.centerii.org/survey
  • The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and
    Improvement. (2009). School restructuring What
    works when? A guide for education leaders.
    Washington, DC Learning Points Associates.
    Retrieved from http//www.centerforcsri.org/files/
    School_Restructuring_Guide.pdf
  • Herman, R., Dawson, P., Dee, T., Greene, J.,
    Maynard, R., Redding, S., Darwin, M. (2008).
    Turning around chronically low-performing
    schools A practice guide. (NCEE 2008-4020).
    Washington, DC National Center for Education
    Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of
    Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education.
    Retrieved from http//ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/publicat
    ions/practiceguides
  • Hess, F. H. (2010). Cages of their own design
    Five strategies to help education leaders break
    free. Washington, DC American Enterprise
    Institute for Public Policy Research. Retrieved
    from http//www.aei.org
  • Kowal, J., Hassel, E. A., Hassel, B. C. (2009).
    Successful school turnarounds Seven steps for
    district leaders. Washington, DC The Center for
    Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement.
    Issue brief retrieved from http//centerforcsri.or
    g/files/CenterIssueBriefSept09.pdf
  • Webcast retrieved from http//www.centerforcsri.
    org/webcasts/school-turnarounds/

45
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
45
  • Lane, B. (2009). Exploring the pathway to rapid
    district improvement. Lincoln, IL Center on
    Innovation and Improvement. Retrieved from
    http//www.centerii.org/survey
  • Miles, K. H., Frank, S. (2008). The strategic
    school Making the most of people, time, and
    money. Thousand Oaks, CA Corwin Press.
  • New Leaders for New Schools. (2009, October)
    Principal effectiveness A new principalship to
    drive student achievement, teacher effectiveness,
    and school turnarounds. NY Author. Retrieved
    from http//www.nlns.org/uef.jsp
  • The New Teacher Project. (2009, December ). Human
    capital reform in Cincinnati public schools
    Strengthening teacher effectiveness and support.
    Brooklyn, NY Author. Retrieved from
    http//www.tntp.org/
  • Perlman, C. L., Redding, S. (Eds). (2010).
    Handbook on effective implementation of school
    improvement grants. Lincoln, IL Center on
    Innovation Improvement. Retrieved from
    http//www.centerii.org/survey
  • Public Impact. (2007). School turnarounds A
    review of the cross-sector evidence on dramatic
    organizational improvement. Lincoln, IL Public
    Impact, Academic Development Institute. Retrieved
    from http//www.centerii.org/survey
  • Public Impact. (2008). School turnaround leaders
    Competencies for success. Chapel Hill, NC
    Author. Retrieved from http//www.publicimpact.com
    /act-strategically-when-schools-fail/competencies-
    for-turnaround-success

46
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
Prepared for NNSIL by Center on Innovation
Improvement and Council of Chief State School
Officers
46
  • Public Impact. (2009, August). Try, try, again
    How to triple the number of fixed failing schools
    without getting any better at fixing schools.
    PowerPoint presentation. Chapel Hill, NC
    Author. Retrieved from http//www.publicimpact.com
    /try-try-again/
  • Roza, M. (2008). Allocation autonomy How
    district policies that deploy resources can
    support (or undermine) district reform
    strategies. Seattle, WA University of
    Washington, Center on Reinventing Public
    Education.
  • Redding, S. (2010). Selecting the intervention
    model and partners. Lincoln, IL Center on
    Innovation Improvement. Retrieved from
    http//www.centerii.org/survey/
  • Redding, S., Walberg, H. (Eds.). (2008).
    Handbook on statewide systems of support.
    Lincoln, IL Center on Innovation Improvement.
    Retrieved from http//www.centerii.org/survey/
  • Steiner, L. (2009). Performance-based dismissals
    cross-sector lessons for school turnarounds.
    Lincoln, IL Center on Innovation Improvement.
    Retrieved from http//www.centerii.org/survey/
  • Walberg, H. J. (Ed.). (2007). Handbook on
    restructuring and substantial school improvement.
    Lincoln, IL Center on Innovation and
    Improvement. Retrieved from http//www.centerii.or
    g/survey/
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