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Using Literacy Strategies to Teach Program Area Content Materials in T

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Using Literacy Strategies to Teach Program Area Content Materials in T & I Programs North Carolina CTE Summer Conference 2012 Imperial C, Koury Convention Center – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Using Literacy Strategies to Teach Program Area Content Materials in T


1
  • Using Literacy Strategies to Teach Program Area
    Content Materials in T I Programs
  • North Carolina CTE Summer Conference 2012
  • Imperial C, Koury Convention Center
  • Greensboro, NC
  • July 26, 2012
  • Lois J. Barnes
  • Lois.barnes_at_sreb.org

2
Do Now! Anticipation Guide
  • While everyone enters and gets settled,
    individually, read each statement in the
    Anticipation Guide found on page 1 in your
    handout.
  • Decide if you think the statement is true of
    false and place a T or F in the Before column to
    the left of each statement.
  • We will come back to this activity after the
    session starts.

3
Southern Regional Education Board
  • Founded in 1948 to improve economic development
    in the south through a focus on education
  • Nonprofit, nonpartisan organization
  • Works with leaders and policy-makers in 16 member
    states
  • Provide data to legislatures and state boards of
    education for decision making
  • Focus on improving education pre-K through best
    practice
  • Network states

4
The SREB Umbrella
  • HSTW
  • MMGW
  • TCTW
  • College and Career
  • Readiness
  • Education Policy
  • Legislative Action
  • Student Access
  • Programs
  • Doctoral Scholars
  • Degree Completion
  • Education Data
  • Education Technology
  • Go Alliance
  • Nursing Education
  • School Leadership
  • Academic Common
  • Market

www.sreb.org
5
HSTW/MMGW/TCTW National Footprint
6
HSTW Key Practices
  • High expectations
  • Program of study
  • Academic studies
  • Career/technical studies
  • Work-based learning
  • Teachers working together
  • Students actively engaged
  • Guidance and advisement
  • Extra help
  • Culture of continuous improvement

7
Anticipation Guide
  • Individually, read each statement in the
    Anticipation Guide found on page 1 in your
    handout.
  • Decide if you think the statement is true of
    false and place a T or F in the Before column to
    the left of each statement.
  • In small groups, compare your answers.
  • Read on your own silently the pages from
    Achieves May, 2012 publication.

8
Anticipation Guide
  • In small groups again, defend your point of view
    about each statement and support it with evidence
    from the article.
  • Whole group discussion What are likely to be
    the curricular and instructional implications of
    embedding the Literacy Common Core State
    Standards into CTE coursework?

9
http//www.achieve.org/CCSS-CTE-Bridging
theDivide
10
Cornell NotesTwo Column Notes
Step 1Draw a grid with 3 sections
Step 2During lesson, take notes here
useabbreviations
Step 3Identifykeyconceptsor questions
Step 4Summarize lesson here
11
Cornell NotesTwo Column Notes
Using Literacy Strategies to Teach TI Content
Details
Main Ideas No Excuses! Why Reading Is Important
Summary
12
T I Teachers might say. . .
  • Teaching reading and writing is not my job
  • I dont have time
  • Its not part of my curriculum

13
Point Gain in the Percentage of CT Students
Meeting the Reading Readiness Goal When
Experiencing CT Instruction with Embedded Literacy
Source SREB. Ready for Tomorrow, 2009.
14
Reading Study Summary
Interquartile Ranges Shown (25 - 75)
1600
1400
1200
Text Lexile Measure (L)
1000
800
600
High School Literature
College Literature
High School Textbooks
College Textbooks
Military
Personal Use
Entry-Level Occupations
SAT 1, ACT, AP
Source of National Test Data MetaMetrics
15
Who teaches READING?
  • Content area literacy instruction must be viewed
    as the cornerstone of any comprehensive movement
    to build the kinds of thriving, intellectually
    vibrant secondary schools young people deserve
    and on which the nations social and economic
    health will depend.
  • Heller and Greenleaf, 2007

16
Elementary School Teachers
  • Traditionally, reading has been considered the
    realm of elementary teachers. For the most part,
    learning to read is taught only in grades K-3.
    Teachers in grades four and beyond teach subject
    matter.
  • OConnor, TECHNIQUES, February 2010

17
Occupational Reading Data Weekly
PercentagesMikulecky, National Adult Literacy
Survey (2001)
Job Memos Reports Manuals Instructions Diagrams
Mgt. 93 83 71 31 30
Prof. 86 63 69 39 41
Tech. 82 68 71 54 49
Sales 70 50 50 28 23
Clerical 85 61 57 31 25
Service 46 28 25 37 12
Farming 37 27 28 24 17
Crafts 61 38 56 34 55
MachOp 47 27 31 25 30
TransOp 54 32 28 25 22
Laborer 41 19 28 20 22
18
  • In 1965, a car mechanic needed to understand
    5,000 pages of service manuals to fix any
    automobile on the road today he must be able to
    decipher 465,000 pages of technical text, the
    equivalent of 250 big-city phone books.
  • Whitman, Shapiro, Taylor, Saltzman and
    Ausrer 1989

19
What do the experts say?
  • Comprehension of reading material and the
    ability to use that material to create new
    thoughts and ideas is the major key to a persons
    success in the global job market.
  • Procedural Literacy Building Blocks of
    Comprehension.
  • Columbia-Montour Area Vocational-Technical
    School, PA, 2007

20
T I Teachers might say. . .
  • Teaching reading and writing is not my job
  • I dont have time
  • Its not part of my curriculum

21
I dont have time
  • Which skills/standards will give you the most
    bang for your buck?
  • Which are most essential to the curricular area?
  • Which appear most
  • often on business,
  • industry, EOC and
  • competitive tests?
  • Which are the
  • hardest to teach and
  • learn?

22
Do students have time to read?
23
Do The Math
  • Goal of 25 books
  • 250 words per minute
  • 250-300 words per page (novel)
  • 200 pages per novel/100 pages per technical book
  • 175 school days
  • equals
  • less than 30 minutes per day
  • to reach goal!

24
Teaching Technical Vocabulary
  • Research suggests that knowledge of the
    specialized word families common in a particular
    area . . .is probably best left to the subject
    teachers.
  • A Report on the STETS Workshop by Paul Nation,
    2001

25
CTE teachers can. . .
  • Allow student choice
  • Connect reading and writing
  • Read aloud
  • Recognize alternative literacy approaches
  • Alternate material for remediation
  • Literacy-rich classrooms
  • Higher expectations
  • OConnor, TECHNIQUES, February 2010

26
Cornell NotesTwo Column Notes
Using Literacy Strategies to Teach TI Content
Details
Main Ideas No Excuses! Why Reading Is
Important Why Writing Is Important
Summary
27
How important is writing?
  • About one student in five produces
  • completely unsatisfactory prose, about 50
  • percent meet basic requirements, and
  • only one in five can be called proficient.
  • National Commission on Writing (NCW)

28
What does it mean?
  • Writing Well Saves Money for Taxpayers
  • Most employers consider writing a threshold
    skill in hiring.
  • States spend more than 220 million on writing
    training annually.
  • American firms spend 3.1 billion annually to
    correct employee writing deficiencies.
  • Writing A Ticket to Work or a Ticket Out?,
    National Commission on Writing, 2004
  • Report State Employees Lack of Writing
    Skills, USAToday, 7/4/05

29
Occupational Writing Data Weekly
PercentagesMikulecky, National Adult Literacy
Survey (2001)
Job Memos Reports Forms
Managerial 75 87 73
Professional 33 73 43
Technical 35 64 49
Sales 51 56 53
Clerical 58 71 63
Service 23 35 26
Farming 31 25 24
Crafts 34 47 42
Machine Op. 22 32 26
Trans. Op. 40 40 48
Laborer 28 26 28
30
  • Three Kinds of Writing in classes
  • Writing Writing Authentic to
    learn to demonstrate writing
  • learning

31
Writing to learnExamples
  • Journals
  • Learning Logs
  • Exit/Admit Slips
  • Inquiry Logs
  • Mathematics Logs
  • Note taking

32
Example - Journaling at Burton Ramer Tech Center
  • Construction Technology
  • Journal Topics
  • 1. Why did you take this class and what did you
    expect to get out of it?
  • 2. What does MSDS stand for? For what reasons
    would a construction worker use an MSDS?
  • NCCER CORE
  • 3. What is PPE and why is it so important to the
    worker? NCCER CORE
  • 4. As a construction worker, what three
  • hand tools do you think are most used and
    why? Support your answer.
  • 5. Why is it important to have building codes
    and inspections?

Student Self-Check Teacher Comments
I filled in the blank with the journal topic.
I have a topic sentence.
I wrote at least three supporting sentences.
I ended with a concluding thought.
My handwriting is legible.
I read my journal to find and correct errors.
33
Writing to Demonstrate LearningExamples of
Writing
  • Paragraphs
  • Summaries
  • Open-response Questions
  • Lab Reports
  • Essays
  • Research Assignments

34
Authentic Writing
  • Memos
  • Reports
  • Letters
  • Proposals
  • Forms
  • Requests
  • Memoirs
  • Poems
  • Songs
  • Short Stories
  • Directions/Process Papers

35
Examples of Technical Writing
  • Action Plans
  • Advertisement
  • Agenda
  • Audit Report
  • Book Review
  • Brochure
  • Budget
  • Business Letter
  • Business Plan
  • Catalog
  • Contract
  • Critique
  • Data Book or Display
  • Description
  • Diagram, Chart, or Graph
  • Editorial
  • Email
  • Feasibility Report
  • Field Test Report

36
T I Teachers might say. . .
  • Teaching reading and writing is not my job
  • I dont have time
  • Its not part of my curriculum

37
Cornell NotesTwo Column Notes
Using Literacy Strategies to Teach TI Content
Details
Main Ideas No Excuses! Why Reading Is
Important Why Writing Is Important CCSS
Summary
38
Its not part of my curriculum
  • Common Core Curriculum
  • Common Core Reading Standards for Literacy
  • in Science and Technical Subjects K-12
  • Common Core Writing Standards for Literacy
  • in History/Social Studies, Science,
  • and Technical Subjects K-12

39
Common Core Standards
  • Reading Standards for Literacy in Science and
    Technical Subjects 9-12
  • Key Ideas and Details
  • Craft and Structure
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
  • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity

40
Range of Reading andLevel of Text Complexity
By the end of grade 12, read and comprehend
science/technical texts in the grades 11-12 text
complexity band proficiently and independently.
41
Text Complexity
  • Vocabularythe number of domain-specific words
    and new general academic terms students
    encounterunknown words
  • Sentence structurehow the ideas in a sentence
    fit togethercomplex sentences, passive voice
  • Coherencehow words, ideas and sentences connect
    to provide meaningsubtle transitions
  • Organizationtime sequence, cause and effect,
    problem and solution, categories
  • Background Knowledgedevelopmental, experiential,
    cognitive factordensity of info.

  • Educational Leadership, March 2012

42
Common Core Standards
  • Writing Standards for Literacy in History/ Social
    Studies, Science and Technical Subjects 6-12
  • Text Types and Purposes
  • Production and Distribution of Writing
  • Research to Build and Present Knowledge
  • Range of Writing

43
Common Core Curriculum
  • Write arguments (to support claims in an analysis
    of substantive topics or texts) focused on
    discipline-specific content.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts (to examine
    and convey complex ideas, concepts, and
    information clearly and accurately through the
    effective selection, organization, and analysis
    of content) including the narration of historical
    events, scientific procedures/experiments, or
    technical processes.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
    development, organization, and style are
    appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

44
Common Core Curriculum
  • Cite specific (strong and thorough) textual
    evidence to support (what the text says
    explicitly as well as inferences drawn) analysis
    of science and technical texts.
  • Use technology, including the Internet, to
    produce, publish, and update individual or shared
    writing. . .
  • Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a
    text summarize complex concepts. . .
    paraphrasing them in simpler but still accurate
    terms.
  • Conduct short as well as more sustained research
    projects . . .

45
Common Core Standards-based WritingARGUMENTATION
Number CCR Anchor Standards for Reading
1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.
9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take.
10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
Number CCR Anchor Standards for Writing
1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.
46
Think-Pair-Share!Turn and Talk!
Using Literacy Strategies to Teach TI Content
Details
Main Ideas No Excuses! Why Reading Is
Important Why Writing Is Important CCSS
Summary
47
Look for SREBs Six Key Reading Skills as found
in the Common Core Standards
HSTW
  • Summarizing
  • Paraphrasing
  • Categorizing
  • Inferring
  • Predicting
  • Recognizing Academic Vocabulary

48
For ExampleKey Ideas and Details
Standard Literacy Component Big Six Skill
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text Read Write Listen Speak Observe Summarize Paraphrase Categorize Infer Predict Understand Vocabulary
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text Instructional Strategy Mini-task Instructional Strategy Mini-task
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text Anticipation Guide, Reciprocal Teaching, Think-Pair-Share, 3-2-1, Cornell Notes, INSERT strategy, Story Impressions Anticipation Guide, Reciprocal Teaching, Think-Pair-Share, 3-2-1, Cornell Notes, INSERT strategy, Story Impressions
49
Reciprocal TeachingMike Rowes Testimony to the
Senate Commerce Committee
  • Handout p. 4
  • Reading on pages 5-7
  • www.mikeroweworks.com

50
Excerpt from Amusement Park PhysicsINSERT
Strategy
  • Read silently and insert
  • In the margins of the
  • Reading
  • I agree
  • X I disagree
  • ! Wow!
  • ? I dont understand (an idea/sentence,
    vocabulary word)
  • Handout page 8

51
Excerpt from Amusement Park Physics3,2,1
Strategy
  • In your small group, reach consensus on your
    3,2,1 ideas from the article excerpt.
  • Handout page 9

52
Story Impressions
  • Preparation activity (pre-reading)
  • During and after reading strategy, too
  • Stimulates interest and creativity
  • Taps prior knowledge
  • Identifies misconceptions
  • Connects to your other vocabulary strategies
  • Practice! See your handout, page 11

53
Closure and Commitment
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