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New Zealand English

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New Zealand English Swetlana Braun Marijana Bubic Jana Burdach Linda Rohlfing Rabea Schwarze Content Origin Variations Pronunciation Vocabulary Comparison of NZE and ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: New Zealand English


1
New Zealand English
  • Swetlana Braun
  • Marijana Bubic
  • Jana Burdach
  • Linda Rohlfing
  • Rabea Schwarze

2
Content
  • Origin
  • Variations
  • Pronunciation
  • Vocabulary
  • Comparison of NZE and Australian English

3
Pronunciation
  • New Zealand English is close to Australian
    English in pronunciation
  • But - shows more affinity to English of
  • Southern England
  • - shows influence of Maori Speech
  • - shows some Scottish and Irish
    influences
  • main differences of New Zealand English in
    comparison to other Englishes are shifted vowel
    sounds

4
Pronunciation
  • Front vowels and the flattened 'i'
  • front vowels are pronounced higher in the mouth
    than in British English
  • the most noticeable difference is the flat "i",
    which is lower and further back so that
    illusion is pronunced in a way sounding like
    allusion
  • allusion, illusion
  • Pete pit pet pat

5
  • The Additional Schwa
  • Newzealanders will insert the schwa to words such
    as grown, and mown, resulting in grow-en and
    mo-wen
  • but groan and moan are unaffected which means
    that these word pairs can be distinguished by
    ear, unlike in British English
  • groan, grown
  • moan, mown

6
  • Distinction between /e?/ /??/
  • Words like "chair" and "cheer", (/t?e?/, /t???/)
    are usually pronounced the same way (/t???/, that
    is as "cheer" in British, American or Australian
    English). The same occurs with "share" and
    "shear" (both pronounced /???/), bear and beer,
    spare and spear.
  • kea, care, cheer, chair
  • beer, bear
  • spear, spare, shear, share

7
  • Lack of distinction between /?/ /?/
  • There is a tendency for some words to be
    pronounced with /?/ rather than /?/, especially
    in those cases where the vowel with this
    particular sound is a stressed "a".
  • words like "warrior" and "worrier" are harder to
    differentiate in New Zealand English than in many
    forms of English.

8
  • Lack of distinction between ferry and fairy
  • for many speakers of New Zealand English, the
    vowel in ferry is raised and becomes
    indistinguishable from fairy
  • the vowel length distinction is almost always
    retained
  • ferry, fairy

9
  • Use of mixed accents
  • The common New Zealand pronunciation of the
    trans- prefix rhymes with "ants.
  • This produces mixed accenting of the a's in
    words like "transplant" whereas in British
    English and most dialects apart from Australian
    English the same accent is placed on both
    syllables.
  • example, transplant

10
Comparison of New Zealand English and Australian
English
  • Mixing-bowl theory
  • NZE influenced Australian English
  • Great variation of influences

11
  • Consonant system
  • /l/ vocalization distinct feature of NZE and
    developing feature of South Australian dialects
  • Yod-dropping

12
  • Vowel system
  • Long vowels, RP /a/
  • Monophtongs are pronounced as diphtongs (e.g.
    fleece)
  • Diphtongs from high-mid to low central (e.g.
    face, price, choice)
  • Long vowels and diphtongs shifted
    counterclockwise form their RP counterparts

13
  • Short vowels (kit, dress, trap)
  • Chain shifts

14
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