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Applying the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to Quality Program Projects

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Title: Applying PM to Quality Program Projects Subject: Project Mgt Author: Greg L. McCormick, PMP Last modified by: Greg L. McCormick, PMP Created Date – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Applying the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) to Quality Program Projects


1
Applying the Project Management Body of Knowledge
(PMBOK) to Quality Program Projects
ASQ-NEIS November 12, 2009
Greg McCormick, PMP
2
My Objectives Tonight
  • Present Project Management as a production
    process
  • Show how to use PMIs PMBOK Guide
  • Reduce variation from expected results
  • Support continual improvement, leading to PM as a
    stable, capable, and predictable process
  • Provide information on PMI certifications
  • Those with PM experience may want to consider
    adding a professional credential

3
Objective 1. Present Project Management as a
Production Process
4
QM Already Thinking Process
  • The full power of the methods to improve quality,
    increase productivity, and reduce cost may not be
    fully realized until these methods are applied to
    processes as well as parts.
  • Improving action on a process is often most
    economical when it is directed at prevention
    rather than detection.
  • Much information about process performance can be
    learned by studying its output(s), but the most
    helpful information comes from understanding the
    process itself and its internal variability.
  • ASQ/AIAG Statistical Process Control

5
Definitions of Process
  • Sequence of activities with a definite beginning
    and end. Something travels through the
    sequence, and resources perform activities along
    the way.
  • Lean Sigma A Practitioners Guide
  • The total combination of people, equipment,
    materials, methods, and environment that work
    together to produce output.
  • ASQ/AIAGs SPC Manual
  • Set of interrelated activities, performed on
    Input(s), in order to achieve a specified Output.
  • PMIs PMBOK Guide

6
PM as a Process
Input(s)
Project Management
Output(s)?
Deming Qoutput f Processoutput So if you
dont like the quality of the Output, ?
7
Is the PM Process Successful?
  • 75B spent on failed IT projects in U.S. every
    year
  • Standish Group
  • 25 of all projects fail outright, are
    terminated, or are abandoned
  • 50 are declared done, but fail to meet scope,
    schedule, quality, and/or budget objectives
  • Only 25 are considered successful
  • PriceWaterhouseCoopers
  • 50 of all projects will cost at least twice the
    original estimate
  • Chaos Report USA

8
Analysis of Projects Costs
budget
Project cost management process(es) Under
control? Capable? Confidently predict that
cost of next project w/b within SLs?
9
Objective 2. Applying PMBOK Guide to Reduce PM
Process Variation (Risk)
Projects fit definition of process but that
process may not consistently produce
outputs acceptable to internal and/or external
customers. Opportunity for process improvement.
10
PMBOK Guide
  • A Guide to the Project Management Body of
    Knowledge
  • Project Management Institute (PMI)
  • ANSI/PMI 99-001
  • Fourth Edition 2008
  • Project applications
  • Any project type
  • Large teams and team of 1
  • Flexible in general/detail, formally/informally
  • ITTO Process Model
  • Knowledge base for Certification

11
PMIs ITTO Process Model
Input(s)
Tools Techniques
Process
Output(s)
  • TT can be
  • Methods
  • Checklists, templates, etc.
  • Software
  • Expert Opinion
  • Output of one process often becomes Input to
    another

12
How Variable is PM Process Box?
Customer Expectations Requirements Constraints
Methods / Templates References (PMBOK) Expert
Opinion
Miracle Happens
Desired Result? (e.g. New Product or Service)
Does variability in PM process affect quality of
Desired Result? Again, Deming says to look at
what part?
13
PM has 5 Process Groups
Are high-level phases in project life-cycle
Process Group
Initiate Ready
Plan Aim
Execute Fire
Monitor Control
Close
Processes
2
26 (60)
7
7
2
Risk
20
45
20
10
5
2/3 of risk can be addressed before Execution!
14
Project Risk Curve
Initiation 20
Planning 45
Execution Control 30
Closing 5
Level of Risk
Project Elapsed Time
Reduce project risk reduce variation in PM
process
15
Corrective Actions Curve
Prevention rather than detection
Time Expense
Initiation
Execution
Planning
Closure
16
Process Group 1. Initiation
  • Defines and authorizes the project
  • Identifies stakeholders and clarifies roles
  • Inputs
  • Business trigger legislation, BOD resolution,
    feasibility study, customer contract, SOW, etc.
  • Tools Techniques
  • Lessons Learned from previous projects
  • Expert opinion PMO, consultants
  • Project Mgt. Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • A Project Charter
  • B Preliminary Scope Statement

17
1A Project Charter
  • Three purposes
  • Formally establish projects existence
  • Officially authorize start of project activities
    spend time and
  • Provide common understanding of purpose (resolves
    disputes)
  • Identifies
  • Who project leadership
  • Sponsor provides resources
  • Champion acts as executive cheerleader
  • Project Manager directs activities and controls
    resources
  • What chief result or deliverable, and its
    customer(s)
  • When project time-line (usually milestone
    chart)
  • Why business driver, need, opportunity,
    justification
  • How Assumptions and Constraints
  • How much cost estimate
  • Should include signatures of
  • Sponsor, Project Manager, and chief Customer

18
1B Preliminary Scope Statement
  • Should include
  • Description of result / deliverable(s)
  • Activities needed to produce result / deliverable
  • Entities involved in performing project (internal
    external)
  • Known project boundaries results, activities,
    resources, etc. that are specifically excluded
  • Risks that may affect success of project
  • Stakeholder matters
  • List of stakeholders and their roles active
    participants, non-participants who are affected,
    interested observers, etc.
  • Expectations, stated and unstated!
  • Issues and concerns
  • Acceptance criteria
  • Should be signed

19
Project Risk After Initiation
Initiation 20 reduction
Level of Risk
Project Elapsed Time

20
Process Group 2. Planning
  • Distinguish
  • Project
  • Product of the project
  • Separate planning into
  • A. Control/Management Planning
  • Usually done by project experts
  • Milestone Management Plan or Project Control
    Plan
  • Documents how we run the project
  • B. Execution/Work Planning
  • Usually done by knowledge-area experts (Team
    Leads)
  • Milestone Execution Plan or Work Plan
  • Documents how we create the projects Output(s)

21
Control Planning
ID activities that manage project Milestone is
Control Plan or Management Plan
Inputs
PM Process
Initiation
Control Planning
Monitor Control
Closing
Execution Planning
Execution
Outputs
22
Control/Management Planning
  • Creates plan that controls project activities
  • Very similar from project to project
  • Inputs
  • Project Charter
  • Preliminary Scope Statement
  • Tools Techniques
  • Lessons Learned from previous projects
  • Organizational resources PMO, consultants
  • Project Mgt. Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • Project Management Plan (aka Control Plan)
    how each of the Knowledge Areas will be managed

23
2A. Project Management Plan
  • Covers Knowledge Areas
  • Scope Management
  • How project scope will be monitored for expansion
    (creep), shrinkage, and deviation
  • What change control process is how changes are
    submitted, approved, controlled, and communicated
  • Time Management
  • How task begin-dates will be set and monitored
  • How task durations will be monitored
  • How schedule tracking will be performed
  • Cost Management
  • How cost variances will be monitored
  • How budget tracking will be monitored
  • How contingency/reserve funds will be administered

24
Project Management Plan, contd
  • Quality Management
  • ID applicable regulations, standards, and
    guidelines
  • Define/clarify acceptance methods and criteria
  • How Quality Assurance (QA) will be provided
  • How Quality Control (QC) will be performed
  • How Corrective Preventative Actions will be
    handled
  • Human Resources Management
  • How appropriately skilled individuals, groups, or
    organizations will be identified
  • How team members will be brought onto the team
  • How members will be oriented, trained, and
    qualified
  • How work performance will be measured / monitored
  • How members will be released when their work is
    completed, or when it is unsatisfactory

25
Project Management Plan, contd
  • Communication Management
  • Identify content required by each stakeholder
    (group)
  • Identify timing of delivery (daily, monthly,
    as-needed)
  • Identify format and media preferences
  • Risk Management
  • How project risks will be identified, analyzed,
    mitigated
  • What risk measures and triggers will be used, and
    how they will be monitored
  • Procurement Management
  • How specifications for goods services are
    developed
  • How suppliers will be qualified and selected
  • How contracts will be managed
  • PM Plan tells how well run the project

26
Execution/Work Planning
ID activities that create product-of-project Miles
tone is Execution Plan or Work Plan
Inputs
PM Process
Initiation
Control Planning
Monitor Control
Closing
Execution Planning
Execution
Outputs
27
Execution/Work Planning
  • Plans activities that create product
  • Inputs
  • Project Charter Preliminary Scope Statement
  • Project Management Plan
  • Tools Techniques
  • Templates industry or previous projects
  • Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
  • Expert opinion / assistance
  • Project Management Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • 2A. Project Schedule
  • 2B. Resource Plan
  • 2C. Project Budget

28
Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
TT for progressive breakdown of work Can be
presented graphically
Italian Dinner
1 Appetizers
3. Dessert
2 Entrée
1.1 Zupa
3.1 Glacé
2.1 Red Side
3.2 More Vino
2.2 Lasagna
1.2 Ensalada
2.2.1 Noodles
1.3 Bread
2.2.2 Meat Sauce
1.4 Vino
2.2.3 Cheese Mix
2.3 More Vino
29
Product Design to Production
  • 1 dFMEA
  • APQP
  • 2.1 CAD/CAM kick-off
  • 2.2 Blueprint development
  • 2.2.1 GDT
  • 2.2.2 Gaging kick-off
  • 2.3 pFMEA
  • 2.4 Control Plan development
  • 2.5 Tooling kick-off
  • 2.6 Lean VSM
  • 2.7 Work-Cell layout
  • 3 Tooling verification
  • 4 Production start

MS-Project uses this numbering scheme
30
Quality Improvement
  • 1 Define specific scope
  • Identify tasks required
  • Assign work and create time-line
  • 4 Perform work and report-out (on-going)
  • 5 Implementation
  • 5.1 Edit documentation
  • 5.1.1 pFMEA and Control Plan
  • 5.1.2 Work-cell layout and Operator Instructions
  • 5.1.3 VSM
  • 5.1.4 Logistics packaging, supply chain, PICS,
    etc.
  • 5.2 Re-PPAP to customer
  • 6 Close the loop
  • 6.1 Update Lessons Learned D/B
  • 6.2 Final report-out to Sr. Management

31
Project Risk After Planning
Initiation 20
Planning 45 65 total reduction in risk
Level of Risk
Project Elapsed Time
Decreasing risk reducing probability of
non-conformance
32
Process Group 3. Execution
  • Perform tasks that produce result/deliverable
  • Inputs
  • Project Execution/Work Plan
  • Task Schedule
  • Resource Plan
  • Budget
  • Tools Techniques
  • Project Mgt. Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • Product, service, or results (e.g. a deliverable)
  • Communications issues, performance reports

33
Process Group 4. Control
  • Monitor performance, and compare it to plan
  • Inputs
  • Project Control/Management Plan
  • Product, service, or results (e.g. a deliverable)
  • Work performance reports and information
  • Tools Techniques
  • Risk triggers
  • Issues tracking system
  • Project Mgt. Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • Raised issues/concerns/problems
  • Corrective or preventative actions
  • Changes in scope, schedule, quality, etc.

34
Process Group 5. Closure
  • Formally ends the project
  • Inputs
  • Product, service, or results (e.g. a deliverable)
  • Work performance reports and information
  • Invoices and receipts
  • Tools Techniques
  • Project Mgt. Information System (PMIS)
  • Outputs
  • Released resources people, equipment,
    facilities, etc.
  • Contract close-outs and settlements
  • Project records, including lessons learned
  • What should happen as result of these?

35
Objective 3. Present Information on PMI
Certifications PMP
36
PMI Certifications
  • Several levels
  • PgMP Program Management Professional
  • PMP Project Management Professional
  • CAPM Certified Associate Project Manager
  • Also functional certifications, such as
  • Project technical support
  • Project scheduling
  • Project risk management
  • PMP Certification
  • 4500 hours of project leadership in past six
    years
  • Take 35-hour prep class on-line
  • Pass four-hour exam with 82 score or better
  • Get 60 PDUs (CE credits) every three years

37
PMI Resources
  • PMI
  • www.pmi.org
  • www.pmi.org/CareerDevelopment/Pages/PMI/Credential
    Overview.aspx
  • NE Indiana Chapter
  • www.pmi-neic.org
  • Monthly meetings Sept May
  • Answer questions about certification
  • Provide web-based prep class

38
In Summary
  • Projects are a production process
  • They historically are not stable nor capable
  • Exceed ELs/SLs on time and money
  • Do not have predictable-quality outputs
  • Would benefit from use of PMBOK Guide
  • Recipe for managing risk (aka variation)
  • Emphasize prevention over detection re-work
  • Whos accountable for your project quality?
  • Identifying resources and best practices
  • Setting standards
  • Conducting audits of behavior and results
  • Facilitating continual improvement in maturity

39
Questions?
Greg McCormick, PMP glmccorm_at_earthlink.net
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