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Concurrent Planning: Multiple Pathways to Permanence Version 2.0, 2010 Module A

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Title: DAY 1, SEGMENT 1 Author: User Last modified by: kmring Created Date: 6/30/2005 4:31:45 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show Company – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Concurrent Planning: Multiple Pathways to Permanence Version 2.0, 2010 Module A


1
Concurrent PlanningMultiple Pathways to
PermanenceVersion 2.0, 2010Module A
2
Goals for the Training
  • In this training we will cover
  • Essentials of Concurrent Planning
  • Values in Concurrent Planning
  • Collaboration toward Permanency

3
Definitions
  • Concurrent planning
  • Permanency outcomes
  • Emotional vs. Legal Permanency

4
Concurrent Planning Values
  • Every child deserves permanency.
  • Requires emotional risks.
  • Foster placement as a service, not an outcome.
  • Requires collaboration.

5
Learning Objectives
  • Knowledge
  • Define Concurrent Planning and Permanence
  • Identify the emotional, developmental effects of
    separation
  • Recognize best practice models
  • Values
  • Permanency as best outcome
  • Concurrent planning as a method for timely
    permanency
  • Ongoing concurrent planning
  • Emotional/relational permanency, pre-existing
    attachments
  • Child-, youth-, and family-centered

6
Data
  • Retrieved from the Center for Social Services
    Research at the UC Berkeley
  • http//cssr.berkeley.edu/ucb_childwelfare/
  • Part of the effort to improve outcomes for
    children and families in the Child Welfare System

7
Placement Data
  • In California on July 1, 2009
  • 59,686 children youth were in child welfare
    supervised foster care.

8
Placement Data
  • 65 of those who enter and stay at least five
    days in placement are still in out-of-home care
    one year later.
  • 25 of those who enter foster care remain in care
    longer than 24 months.

9
Placement Data
  • 60 of youth who age out of the system at age 18
    were in care for 3 years or longer.

10
Discussion
  • What do you see as your role in improving
    outcomes for children and youth, given the issues
    that were presented in the video and the data?

11
Attachment Theory
  • Attachment status sets stage for developing
    autonomy.
  • Attachment deficits lead to
  • Separation anxiety
  • Inability to meet developmental challenges
  • Re-experiencing of rage from early losses
  • Attachment helps the child to
  • Attain full intellectual potential
  • Develop a conscience
  • Trust others
  • Increase self-reliance and feelings of self worth
  • Cope with stress, frustration and jealousy
  • Overcome common fears and worries

12
Separation and Placement
  • Infants
  • Cognitive limitations
  • Become extremely distressed by
  • changes in the environment
  • the absence of trusted caregivers
  • Experience the absence of caregivers as
    immediate, total, and complete

13
Separation and Placement
  • Preschoolers
  • Immature conception of time
  • Assumption that parents will not return
  • Damages self esteem and increases anxiety
  • Feelings of helplessness and loss of control
    interfere with the development of self-directed,
    autonomous behavior

14
Separation and Placement
  • School age children
  • Need concreteness
  • May experience feelings of
  • responsibility, guilt and anxiety
  • confusion, hostility, and resentment
  • worry about family
  • May become lonely and isolated after the loss of
    best friends and peers

15
Separation and Placement
  • Adolescents
  • An emotionally chaotic period Additional stress
    may precipitate crisis.
  • May experience
  • Guilt, anxiety, depression
  • May interfere with development of autonomy.

16
Decreasing Placement Trauma
  • Slow down, explain.
  • Removal calmly facilitated by parent.
  • Parent-Child phone call, visit before leaving
    home.
  • Familiar people to provide emotional support.
  • Comfort items.
  • Build relationship between biological and foster
    parent.
  • Place child as soon as possible.
  • Child knows placement is not his/her fault.
  • Maintain connections between siblings.
  • Attend same school, or arrange good-bye with
    friends.
  • Appropriate and prompt trauma services.

17
Decreasing Placement Trauma
  • Summary
  • Keep child connected to family, loved ones
  • Frequency of contact
  • Timely permanency through reunification,
    adoption, or guardianship

18
Federal and State Legislation
  • Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997
  • The Chafee Foster Care Independence Act
  • California AB 3088
  • California Welfare and Institutions Code

WIC 16501.1(f)(9) WIC 358.1(b) WIC 361.3 WIC 366.21 WIC 706.6(k)
19
Concurrent Planning Key Components
  • Full Disclosure
  • Reasonable Efforts
  • Timelines for Reunification
  • Substantial Probability for Reunification

20
Full Disclosure
  • Provide family members with information and
    possible outcomes that will be upsetting to the
    family members.
  • Required by law
  • Clinically beneficial
  • Who is included in full disclosure?

21
Reasonable Efforts
  • Tasks include
  • Document the problems which necessitated removal.
  • Work with biological parents on
  • MSLC expectation, service plan, and visitation
    plan
  • Refer parents to service providers.
  • Review progress at least monthly with parents.
  • Document all parental participation.
  • Documentation includes
  • Date of referrals to services.
  • Evaluations and/or progress reports.
  • Dates and outcomes of contact with relatives.

22
Timelines for Reunification
  • Begin reunification and permanency efforts
    immediately
  • Length of reunification plan is determined by
  • Childs age at time of removal
  • Parents progress in the plan

23
Assessing for Reunification
  • Important considerations
  • What has the parent done to comply with the
    reunification plan? What can be documented?
  • What does the parent still need to do?
  • What is the visitation plan for the parent?
  • Is the parent following through with visitation?
    What can be documented?
  • How is the child responding to visits with the
    parent?

24
Contact Points
  • Concurrent planning
  • Starts with the initial contact with family
  • Continues and evolves throughout the life of the
    case
  • Does not end until permanency is achieved

25
Concurrent PlanningPromising Practices
  • Early formal search for relatives, absent
    parents.
  • Early compliance with ICWA.
  • Regular collaborative case reviews.
  • Frequent communication between social workers.
  • Intensive early services to biological parents.
  • Individualized assessment, targeted services.
  • Documented full disclosure.
  • Parent / child visitation plans.
  • Build relationship parents substitute care
    providers.

26
Working Together
  • Childs attorney
  • Biological parents attorney
  • Foster parent/relative caregiver

27
Activity Best Practice
  • Directions
  • Read vignette
  • Work in table groups to identify missed
    opportunities to engage in concurrent planning.

28
Practice Constants andPractice Changes
  • Changes to practice
  • Remain the same
  • Services to Children
  • Services to Birth Parents
  • Services to Relatives
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