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Rigor, Relevance, and Daily Lesson Design

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Rigor, Relevance, and Daily Lesson Design Peggy Fillio Peggy.fillio_at_sreb.org * * * * * * * * Example of how the level of work given by the teacher impacts the depth ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Rigor, Relevance, and Daily Lesson Design


1
Rigor, Relevance, and Daily Lesson Design
  • Peggy Fillio
  • Peggy.fillio_at_sreb.org

2
EFFORT vs. ABILITY
  • We have to believe before students can believe
    that hard work pays off, that effort matters,
    that success depends not on your genes but on
    your sweat. What we GIVE to the BEST, we need to
    give to the REST!

3
(No Transcript)
4
Are we setting the bar high enough?
  • Are we requiring grade level work of all students?

5
Assignment Levels Decline
As Grade Level Increases, the Assignments Given
to Students Fall Further and Further Behind Grade
Level Standards
Source John Holton, South Carolina Department of
Education, analysis of assignments from 362
Elementary and Middle Schools in SC.
6
Pattern Continues in HS
Source John Holton, South Carolina Department of
Education, analysis of English Language Art
Assignments in14 High Schools in South Carolina
7
The Call for Rigor
  • From Rigor is Not a Four-Letter Word by Barbara
    R. Blackburn

8
  • Rigor-Related Findings From the Silent Epidemic
  • 47 of dropouts said classes werent interesting.
  • 43 had missed too many days of school and
    couldnt catch up.
  • 69 were not motivated to work hard.
  • 66 would have worked harder if more had been
    demanded of them.

9
  • Rigor-Related Recommendations from Dropouts
  • 71 recommended making school interesting.
  • 55 said there should be help for students who
    have trouble learning.
  • 81 called for more real-world learning
    opportunities.
  • 75 wanted smaller classes with more individual
    instruction.

10
Who knows What Rigor Means??
  • First stumbling block to progress toward
    incorporating rigor is defining what it means.

11
  • Websters Definition of RIGOR
  • To be stiff the quality of being unyielding or
    inflexible a condition that makes life
    difficult, challenging or uncomfortable.

12
1s read Rigor on Trial (pg 22-25) 2s read
Best Teaching Practices for Rigor in Learning
(pg 26-27) 3s read Is it Rigor? Or is it
Something Else? (pg 28-29) 4s read How to
Determine if a Lesson Contains Rigor Using
Blooms Taxonomy to Include Rigor in the
Classroom (pg 30-32)
Jigsaw Defining Rigor
13
Expert Groups Discuss Use the questions on pg 3
to guide the discussion of your article. Prepare
Presentation Each expert group will have 3-5
minutes to present what they discover about rigor
to the large group. The questions will provide a
focus for your presentation. The presentation
must include a visual aid and each group member
must have a role.
Jigsaw Defining Rigor
14
Return to your table group and complete this
frayer model.
15
Rigor is not
More worksheets for the student that finished
16
Rigor is not Using the seventh grade textbook to
teach high performing sixth graders
17
Rigor is not
For selected group of students
18
Rigor is not
More!
19
(No Transcript)
20
RIGOR
REMINDER
. . . is the goal of helping ALL students
develop the capacity to understand content that
is complex, ambiguous, provocative, and
personally or emotionally challenging.
21
But what does Rigor look like in a classroom????
  • Practices that Increase Rigor at the Classroom
    Level
  • (Planner pages 4 5.)

22
So, we have an overall picture of what rigor
involves Now WHAT?
Tools to use to embed rigor into instructional
practice.
23
Using a Taxonomy is a good place to begin
  • Rigor is the expectation that students will be
    able to perform at levels of cognitive complexity
    necessary for proficiency at each grade level,
    and readiness for college and the workplace.
  • Alignment of instruction and assessment with
    standards/objectives that are at those levels of
    cognitive complexity is a critical part of
    increasing rigor in schools.

24
Taxonomy Another Word for Classification
  • A taxonomy is a useful tool for classifying
    objectives, instruction, and assessment to
    determine level of rigor.
  • Using the taxonomy can result in rich discussions
    about intentions, assumptions, and outcomes.
  • The very act of using the taxonomy can motivate
    us toward demanding higher levels of rigor.

25
Blooms Taxonomy
  • Widely known, published in 1956
  • Six levels within the cognitive domain, from the
    simple recall or recognition of knowledge, as the
    lowest level, through increasingly more complex
    and abstract mental levels, to the highest order,
    which is classified as evaluation.
  • Bloom found that over 95 of the test questions
    students encounter require them to think only at
    the lowest possible level... the recall of
    information.

26
What are the 6 Levels of Blooms Taxonomy ?
27
Remembering
  • The learner is able to recall, restate and
    remember learned information.
  • Recognizing
  • Listing
  • Describing
  • Identifying
  • Retrieving
  • Naming
  • Locating
  • Finding
  •   Can you recall information?
  •  

28
Understanding
  • The learner grasps the meaning of information by
    interpreting and translating what has been
    learned.
  • Interpreting
  • Exemplifying
  • Summarising
  • Inferring
  • Paraphrasing
  • Classifying
  • Comparing
  • Explaining
  •   Can you explain ideas or concepts?

29
Applying
  •  The learner makes use of information in a
    context different from the one in which it was
    learned.
  • Implementing
  • Carrying out
  • Using
  • Executing
  •  Can you use the information in another
  • familiar situation?

30
Analyzing
  • The learner breaks learned information into its
    parts to best understand that information.
  • Comparing
  • Organizing
  • Deconstructing
  • Attributing
  • Outlining
  • Finding
  • Structuring
  • Integrating
  •  Can you break information into parts to explore
    understandings and relationships?

31
Creating
  • The learner creates new ideas and information
    using what has been previously learned.
  • Designing
  • Constructing
  • Planning
  • Producing
  • Inventing
  • Devising
  • Making
  •  Can you generate new products, ideas, or ways of
    viewing things?

32
Evaluating
  • The learner makes decisions based on in-depth
    reflection, criticism and assessment.
  • Checking
  • Hypothesising
  • Critiquing
  • Experimenting
  • Judging
  • Testing
  • Detecting
  • Monitoring
  •   Can you justify a decision or course of action?

33
The Three Little Pigs
34
Recall, Knowledge, Remembering
  • Read the story and list the type of house built
    by each pig.

35
Reproduction, Comprehension, Understanding
  • Describe the materials used to build each home.

36
Reasoning, Using Skills and Concepts,
Application, Applying
  • Using models, demonstrate which house stood up
    the best.

37
Complex or Strategic Thinking, Analysis, Analyzing
  • What is the relationship between the materials
    used to build each house and what happened to the
    houses when the wolf blew on it.

38
Extended Thinking or Reasoning, Synthesis, Create
Invent a new ending for the story where the wolf
comes out ahead.
39
Extended Thinking or Reasoning,
Evaluation, Evaluate
Judge the homes from worst to best, according to
strength, cost, and building time.
40
Lets Practice
Using a fairy tale or nursery rhyme, create
activities or questions for each level of
Blooms.
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • Application
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Evaluation

41
Learning Walk
42
  • Tools to aid the Instructional Alignment Process
  • Based on Total Instructional Alignment by Lisa
    Carter

43
The question in not whether you could have
learned the information on which you were
assessed. The question is were you TAUGHT the
information that was assessed?
44
All students can learn however, they can only
learn those thing they are taught.
45
No school reform can succeed without
instructional alignment
46
Alignment of the 1990s Classroom
Misalignmenttypically based on textbook
sequences or teachers preference
47
Alignment of the 1990s Classroom
Some curriculum not taught.
Some thing assessed are not in the curriculum.
Misalignmenttypically based on textbook
sequences or teachers preference
48
Alignment of Todays High Performing Classrooms
Instruction is guided by assessment data and is
focused on state standards as the minimum
provided content.
49
High Performing Schools Know That Alignment Is a
Cycle
50
Quick Table Minute
  • Take one minute to summarize standards,
    curriculum and instructional alignment activities
    that are commonly used in your district or at
    your school.
  • When are these activities done?
  • How frequently?
  • Who is involved?
  • How is the work shared?
  • Who evaluates the quality of the work?

51
Alignment of Instructional Practices Tools to
insure consistency of what is to be taught
52
Cognitive Domain (revised)
  • Original Blooms
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • Application
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Evaluation
  • Revised Blooms
  • Remembering
  • Understanding
  • Applying
  • Analyzing
  • Evaluating
  • Creating

Source Anderson et al. (2001).
53
Revised Blooms
  • More authentic tool for curriculum planning,
    instructional delivery and assessment
  • Applies K-16 and beyond
  • Emphasizes explanation and description of
    subcategories
  • Describes content and learning and provides
    examples across subject areas
  • Can plot objectives, activities and assessments
    for entire unit, ensuring alignment and rigor
  • Helps develop a shared vocabulary

54
Revised Blooms
  • Review the Revised Taxonomy of Educational
    Objectives on page 11.
  • Identify the most obvious differences from the
    SREB Instructional Rubrics.

55
Plotting on the Taxonomy
56
Revised Blooms
  • Work with your tablemates to determine where each
    of the standards on page 13 of the planner fall
    on the dimensions of knowledge and cognitive
    processes.
  • Use the Revised Taxonomy Table on page 11 to
    guide your discussions.

57
Begin with the End in Mind
  • Read pg 57-59 of Teach Like a Champion.
  • As you read highlight 3 important ideas to share
    with your tablemates.

58
Begin with the End in Mind
  • Summary
  • Progressing from unit planning to lesson
    planning.
  • Using a well-framed objective to define the goal
    of each lesson.
  • Determine how you will assess your effectiveness
    in reaching your goal.
  • Deciding on your activity.
  • Is this how you currently plan???

59
Begin with the End in Mind
  • Students today are being assessed on their
    ability to think at higher levels, not on their
    ability to know and understand
  • Why?
  • Often instructional alignment is not a content
    issue, but a level of thinking issue.
  • Behavioral goals and objectives must we written
    to address higher cognitive levels.

60
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Behavior
Learning
1
2
General
4
3
Specific
61
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Behavior
1
The Thinking Box
General
General behavior or level at which you want the
students thinking. (Level of Blooms)
62
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Learning
2
General Learning Box
General
Strand or Unit title Ie. Algebra Linear
Equations Biology The Cell English Literary
Elements
63
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Behavior
Specific activities that demonstrate students are
thinking at the target level. Always a verb. Must
match level of Blooms in Box 1.
3
The Doing Box
Specific
64
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Learning
4
Specific content
Specific
Outgrowth of the general content
65
Practice Constructing a Learning Objective
  • The Box by Lisa Carter

Behavior
Learning
1
2
knowledge
Living things
General
4
3
Three characteristics of a mammal
Specific
listing
66
  • Learning Objective
  • The learner will demonstrate knowledge of living
    things by listing three characteristics of a
    mammal.

67
Are your Objectives Effective?
4 Ms Technique Manageable Measur
able Made First Most Important Use
the 4 Ms to evaluate the effectiveness of the
objectives you have written. Teach Like a
Champion Page 60-62
4 Ms
68
Task Analysis Another tool for lesson
planning..
69
Task Analysis You need to travel to Albuquerque
to attend a Start-Up conference. What
decisions/information do you need to accomplish
this task?
70
Task Analysis
Sequencing the knowledge and skills students will
need to achieve the objective. - Not a new
term -Take a broad goal and break it down into
the necessary (Hunter) -What do students need
to know and be able to do to understand a
standard -Essential things that must take place
and what order must they happen.
71
Task Analysis
First make sure you have a good instructional
goal that is written in behavioral/measurable
goal. Second, clarify understanding to make sure
there is a common understanding of what the
standard means and how a student would be able to
demonstrate mastery. Third, identify the
essential learning pieces leading up to being
successful in accomplishing the instructional
goal. Fourth, determine the sequence of those
essential learning tasks in order of simple to
more complex.
72
ALL daily lesson plans
should fall under the of a UNIT PLAN
73
TEN STEPS FOR PLANNING AND WRITING
STANDARDS-BASED UNITS WWW.SREB.ORG
  • Planning for Improved Student Achievement

74
UNIT FRAMEWORK
Sequence of Daily Instruction
75
Exit Card
  • Complete the following sentence stems
  • I learned that . . .
  • I was surprised that I . . .
  • I was pleased that I . . .

Literacy Strategy!
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