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Increasing access to healthy food: The Baltimore food policy case study

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Increasing access to healthy food: The Baltimore food policy case study Anne Palmer Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Grantmakers in Health – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Increasing access to healthy food: The Baltimore food policy case study


1
  • Increasing access to healthy food The Baltimore
    food policy case study
  • Anne Palmer
  • Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future
  • Grantmakers in Health
  • November 18, 2008

2
Overview
  • CLFs involvement
  • Overview of the food environment in Baltimore
    City
  • Chain of events that lead to the food policy task
    force being developed
  • Next steps

3
The Center for a Livable Future
  • Mission to promote research and to develop and
    communicate information about the complex
    interrelationships among diet, food production,
    environment and public health
  • Fund research, education, and program activities
  • 3 program areas Farming, Eating and Living for
    the Future
  • EFF program goal Promote changes in food
    access, purchasing and consumption to ensure a
    safe, healthy and equitable food supply.

4
What is the food situation in Baltimore?
  • Poor access to healthy and affordable food,
    especially in lower income communities
  • 9.4 of households in Maryland reported low food
    security and 3.6 reported very low food security
    (hunger)
  • Until recently, supermarkets were closing and
    moving out of the city

5
Corner Stores
6
Corner Stores
7
CLF funded relevant research
  • Dr. Manuel Francos PhD research on Availability
    of
  • Healthy Foods, Neighborhood Characteristics
  • Dr. Joel Gittelsohns Baltimore Healthy Stores
  • project to work with local corner store owners
    to promote purchase of healthy food options.

8
Community Food Assessment in SW Baltimore
  • Goal
  • - Store survey - measure the availability of
    healthy food in their neighborhood.
  • Residents survey - identify key food and
    nutrition issues that community members are
    facing.
  • Objectives
  • - Identify institutional barriers and strengths
    to accessing fresh, healthy foods
  • Identify individual barriers and strengths to
    consuming a healthy diet
  • Identify educational and communication
    opportunities to increase awareness of the
    benefits of healthy eating

9
Availability of fruits
10
Availability of vegetables
11
Residents Survey Food Shopping
  • Most of their visits (46) at corner stores

12
Residents Survey Food Shopping
  • Most money spent at supermarkets
  • Average monthly expenditures
  • 140 corner stores 274 supermarkets
  • 153 carry out 44 fast food
  • 43 at covered market 48 sit down restaurant

13
Residents Survey Access Availability
  • 35 - sometimes were unable to buy healthy food
    due to lack of resources
  • 17 - often were unable to buy healthy food due
    to lack of resources
  • 40 - stated certain foods were desired but not
    available (e.g. fresh fruits, vegetables, quality
    meat)

14
Chance opportunities (vs well-plotted strategies)
  • Dr. Francos doctoral presentation of the
    research to health department - Healthy Foods,
    Neighborhood Characteristics, Dietary Patterns
    and Body Mass Index
  • Health Commissioner becomes intrigued by issue
    and asks CLF to call a meeting

15
Getting to know you
  • Joint meeting conducted in Dec. 2007 with
  • planning, health, university and
  • community representation
  • Goals of meeting
  • Achieve a better understanding of
  • each organizations current planned
  • activities re food security and
  • food environments
  • Discuss possible areas of
  • collaboration

16
Shall we dance?
  • January meeting
  • Identifying potential collaboration
  • mutual support
  • Decide to seek funding for joint
  • project planning dept leads RWJ bid
  • CLF offers to hold workshop to
  • learn about food policy councils

17
Should we do this here?
  • Mark Winne Community Food Security Coalitions
  • Food Policy Council coordinator
  • Invited large group of stakeholders MD Hunger
    Solutions, MD Hospitals for Healthy Environment,
    MD Cooperative Extension, Slow Food, Associated
    Black Charities, Community Development
    Corps,etc..
  • What are Food Policy Councils and How Can They
  • Improve a Communitys Food System

18
What we learned from Mark Local Food
Organizations (LFOs) and Businesses Begin to Fill
the Gap with Projects
  • Non-profit organizations (farmers markets, CSAs,
    community gardens)
  • Community Development Corporations (supermarket
    development, new farm enterprises)
  • Faith-based institutions (food pantries, food
    banks)
  • Government Services and Programs (food stamps,
    WIC, farmland preservation)
  • Schools (child nutrition programs,
    farm-to-school)
  • Cooperative Extension (farmer assistance,
    nutrition education)
  • Private entrepreneurs (market-based enterprises,
    coops)

From Mark Winne, Closing the Food Gap Food
Policy Councils and Coalitions Making the Right
Prevalent, Baltimore, MD Feb. 12, 2008
19
What we learned from Mark But the LFOs
are never enough
  • Never enough money
  • Dont become large enough to make a major impact
  • Replication and expansion are stymied
  • Many food and agriculture problems too entrenched
    and complex
  • LFO efforts are often fragmented and
    uncoordinated

From Mark Winne, Closing the Food Gap Food
Policy Councils and Coalitions Making the Right
Prevalent, Baltimore, MD Feb. 12, 2008
20
FPCs Can Complement and Extend the Work of LFOs
  • Since state and local governments dont have
    Departments of Food, FPCs can
  • Represent a variety of private and public food
    system interest groups and agencies
  • Cut across government department lines and focus
    on food, nutrition, and agriculture issues
  • 3. Serve as a food system planning venue and
    promote coordination between food system
    stakeholders
  • 4. Accept responsibility for ensuring that
    major food and farming goals are met

From Mark Winne, Closing the Food Gap Food
Policy Councils and Coalitions Making the Right
Prevalent, Baltimore, MD Feb. 12, 2008
21
Workshop results participants ideas
  • Establish a mission statement
  • Develop white paper to justify need and provide
    direction
  • Obtain city council resolution

22

What happened next
  • Working group meetings
  • City Health Commissioner decides to co-chair task
    force with Director of Planning to look into FPC
    model (April 08)

23

24
Lessons Learned (being learned)
  • Seek out a variety of partners (universities,
    planners)
  • Where are the opportunities? (obesity work,
    Baltimore City Sustainability Commission)
  • Expect delays (resignation of planning director)

25
Challenges
  • Need economic advice (income generating body)
  • Time line
  • Lack of continuity
  • Need to build capacity of all stakeholders
  • Need to involve the agricultural/farming
    community (city vs county)
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