All Means ALL: Strategies for Special Education Students - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – All Means ALL: Strategies for Special Education Students PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 578e00-NzQxZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

All Means ALL: Strategies for Special Education Students

Description:

Title: Carthage R-9 School District Author: DAD Last modified by: Valued Acer Customer Created Date: 6/5/2008 8:19:16 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:600
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 117
Provided by: Dad136
Learn more at: http://www.cesa6.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: All Means ALL: Strategies for Special Education Students


1
  • All Means ALL Strategies for Special Education
    Students
  • Sue Szachowicz
  • Principal, Brockton High School
  • Senior Advisor, International Center for
  • Leadership in Education
  • WISCONSIN, NOVEMBER 2009

2
TODAYS AGENDA
  1. Implementing the Literacy Initiative Across the
    Curriculum
  2. What Gets Monitored Is What Gets Done
  3. All Means ALL Strategies for Special Education
    Students
  4. Building Relationships with Faculty, Students,
    and Parents

3
  • Ownership
  • Expectations
  • Intervention Systems
  • Inclusion/Collaborative teaching
  • Organization

Key Elements to Improve Performance for Students
Receiving Special Education Services
4
  • A reminder
  • We could make lots of excuses

4
5
  • BROCKTON HIGH SCHOOL
  • Comprehensive 9 12
  • Enrollment over 4,300
  • Poverty Level 72
  • 30 different languages represented
  • 38 do not speak English as their primary
    language
  • Approximately 12 enrolled in Transitional
    Bilingual Education
  • Approximately 11 receive Special Education
    Services

5
5
6
  • Student Population
  • 55.5 Black - includes African-American, Cape
    Verdean, Haitian, Jamaican, and others
  • 27.3 White
  • 14 Hispanic
  • 2.7 Asian
  • .5 American Indian

6
6
7
  • And remember

You MUST pass to graduate!!!
NO EXCEPTIONS!
7
8
(No Transcript)
9
  • MCAS 1998
  • Failure
  • ELA 44
  • MATH 75
  • MCAS 1998
  • AdvancedProficient
  • ELA 22
  • MATH 7

9
9
10
  • FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION
  • ELA Failure rate - 78 Math Failure rate - 98
  • So, do you think what were doing is working???

10
10
11
Brockton HS Special Ed Case Study The Situation
  • Everyone was failing
  • Special Ed Students taught in separate
    classrooms
  • Teachers not certified in subject area
  • Lower student expectations

12
  • We HAD to do something
  • and FAST!!!

12
13
OWNERSHIP
  • There needs to be greater ownership of
    educational performance of students receiving
    special education services by the general
    education faculty.

14
OWNERSHIP
  • The term too much separation between the
    general education and special education program
    and faculty is used frequently.

15
OWNERSHIP
  • My Kids/Your Kids more often at secondary
    level.

16
  • OWNERSHIP

My kids/Your kids?
16
17
  • What we had

17
18
  • We had Empires
  • Brockton High
  • The Medieval Feudal System

18
19
  • What we did

19
20
  • Structured Interdisciplinary Faculty Discussion
    Groups
  • Facilitated by Restructuring Committee members
  • Guided questions provided

20
21
  • 1. What do you see as the major obstacle our
    special education students face in your class?
  • 2. What procedures/ techniques/ strategies have
    you used that you feel have been most successful
    for our students with disabilities in your
    classes?
  • 3. What do you think you need to help your
    students with disabilities be successful in your
    class?

21
22
Faculty Meetings became Literacy Workshops
22
23
THINKING ABOUT WORDS Literacy Writing and
Speaking To explain ones thinking in
complete sentences Literacy Reasoning To
identify and explain a pattern DIRECTIONS
You will use the list of vocabulary words you
are currently working with to do the following
activities. A. CATEGORIZE group words
according to similarities. Directions
Create three categories of at least three words
each. Each group must be labeled with a
detailed phrase that clearly indicates the nature
of the similarity. Be creative! Ex Words that
indicate a persons state of mind when taking
MCAS Nervous Confident Depressed
23
24
EXPECTATIONS
  • Issues
  • Low expectations by administrators can be
    particularly problematic.
  • There is confusion between expectations and
    holding students to the same standards.

25
EXPECTATIONS
  • Most admit to low expectations for students
    receiving special education services in their
    schools.
  • Lack of expectations can lead to watered down
    curriculum and over use of modifications for
    students receiving special education services.

26
EXPECTATIONS
  • The level of expectation often drives delivery
    services models.
  • The lack of a clear district vision and clear
    goals for special education services often
    results in mixed expectations.

27
  • HIGH EXPECTATIONS

Some kids can/some kids cant?
27
28
  • What we had

28
29
  • We had a flawed belief system
  • Students have a
  • right to fail.
  • Former BHS Principal

29
30
  • Clearly defined tracks with separate curriculum
    and NOT equal!!!
  • In ELA Different selections
  • In Math Different courses

30
31
  • What we did

31
32
  • Raising the Standards ALL MEANS ALL!!!

32
33
  • Two pronged approach
  • 1. Literacy skills for ALL
  • NO EXCEPTIONS!!!
  • 2. Safety nets and interventions for stuggling
    learners

33
34
34
35
OPEN RESPONSE STEPS TO FOLLOW 1. READ QUESTION
CAREFULLY. 2. CIRCLE OR UNDERLINE KEY WORDS. 3.
RESTATE QUESTION AS THESIS (LEAVING BLANKS). 4.
READ PASSAGE CAREFULLY. 5. TAKE NOTES THAT
RESPOND TO THE QUESTION. BRAINSTORM MAP
OUT YOUR ANSWER. 6. COMPLETE YOUR THESIS. 7.
WRITE YOUR RESPONSE CAREFULLY, USING YOUR MAP AS
A GUIDE. 8. STATEGICALLY REPEAT KEY WORDS FROM
THESIS IN YOUR BODY AND IN YOUR END
SENTENCE. 9. PARAGRAPH YOUR RESPONSE. 10. REREAD
AND EDIT YOUR RESPONSE.
35
36
CONTENT FORM
8 Response contains a clear thesis and insightfully answers all parts of the question. Response provides relevant and specific textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are clear and accurate, and demonstrate superior understanding of the material. 4 Response contains sophisticated and effective use of transitions and strategic repetition indicating complete control of the material. Response is logically and effectively organized in its thesis, paragraphing, and sequencing of examples. Response contains clear sentence structure with few or no errors.
6 Response contains a clear thesis and adequately answers all parts of the question. Response provides relevant but general textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are mostly clear and accurate, and demonstrate good understanding of the material. 3 Response contains adequate but simplistic use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response is organized in its thesis, paragraphing, and sequencing of examples. Response contains clear sentence structure with no distracting errors. LEGIBILITY 1 Easy to read 0 Difficult to read
4 Response contains a thesis but only partially answers the question. Response provides a mix of accurate and inaccurate textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are vague and/or demonstrate limited understanding of the material. 2 Response contains some inappropriate use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response demonstrates lapses in the organization of its thesis, paragraphing, and/or sequencing of examples. Response contains lapses in sentence structure that interfere with the clarity of thought.
2 Response contains a thesis but only minimally answers the question. Response provides insufficient and/or largely inaccurate textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are unclear and/or demonstrate minimal understanding of the material. 1 Response contains incorrect or inadequate use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response reflects minimal organization of its thesis, paragraphing, and/or sequencing of examples. Response contains major errors in sentence structure. LENGTH 1 Sufficient 0 Insufficient
0 Response is incorrect. Response contains insufficient evidence to show understanding of the material. Response is off-topic and/or contains irrelevant content. 0 Response contains no evidence of transitions and strategic repetition. Response reflects no organization. Response contains little to no evidence of sentence structure.
Evaluated by Self Peer
Teacher (Circle One) SCORING 13-14
Advanced 11-12 Proficient 8-10 Needs
Improvement 0-7 Failing





36
37
CONTENT FORM
8 Response contains a clear thesis and insightfully answers all parts of the question. Response provides relevant and specific textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are clear and accurate, and demonstrate superior understanding of the material. 4 Response contains sophisticated and effective use of transitions and strategic repetition indicating complete control of the material. Response is logically and effectively organized in its thesis, paragraphing, and sequencing of examples. Response contains clear sentence structure with few or no errors.
6 Response contains a clear thesis and adequately answers all parts of the question. Response provides relevant but general textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are mostly clear and accurate, and demonstrate good understanding of the material. 3 Response contains adequate but simplistic use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response is organized in its thesis, paragraphing, and sequencing of examples. Response contains clear sentence structure with no distracting errors. LEGIBILITY 1 Easy to read 0 Difficult to read
4 Response contains a thesis but only partially answers the question. Response provides a mix of accurate and inaccurate textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are vague and/or demonstrate limited understanding of the material. 2 Response contains some inappropriate use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response demonstrates lapses in the organization of its thesis, paragraphing, and/or sequencing of examples. Response contains lapses in sentence structure that interfere with the clarity of thought.
2 Response contains a thesis but only minimally answers the question. Response provides insufficient and/or largely inaccurate textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are unclear and/or demonstrate minimal understanding of the material. 1 Response contains incorrect or inadequate use of transitions and strategic repetition. Response reflects minimal organization of its thesis, paragraphing, and/or sequencing of examples. Response contains major errors in sentence structure. LENGTH 1 Sufficient 0 Insufficient
0 Response is incorrect. Response contains insufficient evidence to show understanding of the material. Response is off-topic and/or contains irrelevant content. 0 Response contains no evidence of transitions and strategic repetition. Response reflects no organization. Response contains little to no evidence of sentence structure.
CONTENT 8 Response contains a clear thesis
and insightfully answers all parts of the
question. Response provides relevant and specific
textual evidence. Explanations of evidence are
clear and accurate, and demonstrate superior
understanding of the material. 6 Response
contains a clear thesis and adequately answers
all parts of the question. Response provides
relevant but general textual evidence. Explanation
s of evidence are mostly clear and accurate, and
demonstrate good understanding of the material.
Evaluated by Self Peer
Teacher (Circle One) SCORING 13-14
Advanced 11-12 Proficient 8-10 Needs
Improvement 0-7 Failing





37
38
INTERVENTIONS
  • Intervention teams morph into pre-referral
    teams.
  • Intervention approaches across buildings are
    often inconsistent and inefficient.

39
INTERVENTIONS
  • Intervention systems are frequently not data
    driven processes and effectiveness is measured by
    the number of referrals to special education
    rather than improvement in performance as a
    result of successful interventions.

40
ESTABLISHING AN EFFECTIVE INTERVENTION SYSTEM
IN CARTHAGE RESULTED IN A 13 REDUCTION IN
SPECIAL EDUCATION EXPENDITURES
41
  • INTERVENTION SYSTEMS

Fair doesnt mean the same
41
42
  • What we had

42
43
  • Our reality
  • LEARNED DEPENDENCE
  • We had to get to
  • INDEPENDENCE!!!

43
44
  • And in regular ed classes
  • SINK OR SWIM!!

44
45
  • What we did

45
46
  • Improving Student Academic Achievement
  • Assess ALL aggregate subgroups
  • Develop a system of safety nets
  • Interventions
  • Special programs for struggling learners

46
46
47
  • EPT process through regular ed
  • Academic Support Contracts

47
48
  • Brockton High School Academic Success Plan
  • Brockton High School seeks to teach our students
    in a safe, supportive environment the knowledge,
    skills, values, and behaviors necessary to become
    responsible and productive members of a diverse
    society. Instruction focuses on enabling students
    to demonstrate the literacy skills of reading,
    writing, speaking, and reasoning and preparing
    them to participate actively as citizens in a
    technologically advanced society. In order to
    provide such a place for our students, we require
    you, in turn, to agree to the terms of the
    contract prescribed below.
  • I will agree to the following academic
    goals
  • To attend school daily and on time. I have
    read and understand the school attendance policy.
  • To attend all classes regularly and on time. I
    have read and understand the school disciplinary
    policy.
  • To give my best effort in all my classes.
  • To achieve the following specific academic goals
  • (Check all that apply)
  • To meet with peer mediators and academic tutors
    available in the Access Center.
  • To meet with my guidance and/or adjustment
    counselor regularly.
  • To demonstrate consistent acceptable behavior
    throughout the school day.
  • To attend Anger Management classes.
  • To submit a completed weekly progress notice to
    the Housemaster. __________________________
  • To attend meetings each term with my Student
    Support Team.
  • Other _________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    _______
  • Additional Academic Supports
  • Peer tutoring - available during the school day
    in the Access Center, G121.
  • Homework assistance - available daily in R331,
    230-400 PM.
  • Club Boxer - academic support Monday and
    Wednesday in A324 230-315 PM.

48
48
49
  • Brockton High School Academic Success Plan
  • Brockton High School seeks to teach our students
    in a safe, supportive environment the knowledge,
    skills, values, and behaviors necessary to become
    responsible and productive members of a diverse
    society. Instruction focuses on enabling students
    to demonstrate the literacy skills of reading,
    writing, speaking, and reasoning and preparing
    them to participate actively as citizens in a
    technologically advanced society. In order to
    provide such a place for our students, we require
    you, in turn, to agree to the terms of the
    contract prescribed below.
  • I will agree to the following academic
    goals
  • To attend school daily and on time. I have
    read and understand the school attendance policy.
  • To attend all classes regularly and on time. I
    have read and understand the school disciplinary
    policy.
  • To give my best effort in all my classes.
  • To achieve the following specific academic goals
  • (Check all that apply)
  • To meet with peer mediators and academic tutors
    available in the Access Center.
  • To meet with my guidance and/or adjustment
    counselor regularly.
  • To demonstrate consistent acceptable behavior
    throughout the school day.
  • To attend Anger Management classes.
  • To submit a completed weekly progress notice to
    the Housemaster. __________________________
  • To attend meetings each term with my Student
    Support Team.
  • Other _________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    _______
  • Additional Academic Supports
  • Peer tutoring - available during the school day
    in the Access Center, G121.
  • Homework assistance - available daily in R331,
    230-400 PM.
  • Club Boxer - academic support Monday and
    Wednesday in A324 230-315 PM.

Brockton High School Academic Success
Plan Instruction focuses on enabling students to
demonstrate the literacy skills of reading,
writing, speaking, and reasoning and preparing
them to participate actively as citizens in a
technologically advanced society. In order to
provide such a place for our students, we require
you, in turn, to agree to the terms of the
contract prescribed below.
49
49
50
  • Brockton High School Academic Success Plan
  • Brockton High School seeks to teach our students
    in a safe, supportive environment the knowledge,
    skills, values, and behaviors necessary to become
    responsible and productive members of a diverse
    society. Instruction focuses on enabling students
    to demonstrate the literacy skills of reading,
    writing, speaking, and reasoning and preparing
    them to participate actively as citizens in a
    technologically advanced society. In order to
    provide such a place for our students, we require
    you, in turn, to agree to the terms of the
    contract prescribed below.
  • I will agree to the following academic
    goals
  • To attend school daily and on time. I have
    read and understand the school attendance policy.
  • To attend all classes regularly and on time. I
    have read and understand the school disciplinary
    policy.
  • To give my best effort in all my classes.
  • To achieve the following specific academic goals
  • (Check all that apply)
  • To meet with peer mediators and academic tutors
    available in the Access Center.
  • To meet with my guidance and/or adjustment
    counselor regularly.
  • To demonstrate consistent acceptable behavior
    throughout the school day.
  • To attend Anger Management classes.
  • To submit a completed weekly progress notice to
    the Housemaster. __________________________
  • To attend meetings each term with my Student
    Support Team.
  • Other _________________________________________
    __________________________________________________
    _______
  • Additional Academic Supports
  • Peer tutoring - available during the school day
    in the Access Center, G121.
  • Homework assistance - available daily in R331,
    230-400 PM.
  • Club Boxer - academic support Monday and
    Wednesday in A324 230-315 PM.
  • I _____________________________will agree to the
    following academic supports
  • (Check all that apply)
  • To meet with peer mediators and academic tutors
    available in the
  • Access Center.
  • To meet with my guidance and/or adjustment
    counselor regularly.
  • To demonstrate consistent acceptable behavior
    throughout the day.
  • To submit a completed weekly progress notice to
    the Housemaster.
  • To attend the Extended Day Support Program
  • To work with Boxer-2-Boxer
  • To attend meetings each term with my Student
    Support Team.
  • Other __________________________________________
    __

50
50
51
  • For us What gets monitored is
  • what gets done!!!
  • Collection and review of student work
  • Portfolios for all students with IEPs and for all
    ELL students

51
52
  • LESSON LEARNED THE HARD WAY tip
  • Be VERY specific about what needs to be included
    in the portfolio!

52
52
53
  • Student
  • Portfolio
  • Requirements

53
53
54
54
54
55
Term 3 2 Long Compositions Each piece must be
accompanied by all pre-writing steps. Minimum of
1 revision after evaluation of the final
draft. Students should read 1 book and learn how
to use it with multiple long composition
questions. Students should follow mapping
strategies for this. As a result, the student
will know one book in-depth and will be prepared
to write about it regardless of the question
posed. 1 Open Response Multiple Choice test
This should target the students weakest area as
determined by the Term 2 portfolio.
55
55
56
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • For years, and years, and years, and years
    students receiving special education services had
    been failing to meet standards
  • Almost no matter what their disability.

57
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • Weve learned a lot in the last few years about
    the power of co-teaching and team teaching and
    what it takes to make it highly effective.
  • HOWEVER There are issues.

58
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • Special education personnel are often spread too
    thin in their inclusion support roles.
  • Therefore general education teachers dont feel
    like they are getting adequate support.

59
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • Co-teaching, particularly at the secondary level,
    has emerged as a highly effective model but in
    many districts suffers from
  • Therefore general education teachers dont feel
    like they are getting adequate support.

60
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • Lack of clear expectations of staff
  • Lack of preparatory staff development
  • Lack of common planning time
  • Lack of ongoing support

61
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • This results in inconsistent approaches that
    effect student opportunity.
  • A tendency to evolve to a teach/assist model.
  • Lack of common planning time
  • Lack of ongoing support
  • Therefore general education teachers dont feel
    like they are getting adequate support.

62
INCLUSION/COLLABORATIVE TEACHING
  • Frequently hear co-teaching partners describe
    their experiences as
  • I feel like a teacher-aide
  • We dont want to step on each others toes

63
Signs of Trouble
  • We are trying to figure it out as we go
  • Im glad we were given common planning time, but
    I need it to do my I.E.P.s

64
  • Revolving door partner approaches dont work
    very well.

65
  • INCLUSION

Is it really CO-teaching?
65
66
  • What we had

66
67
  • Special education students taught in separate
    classes
  • Often teachers were not certified in subject area

67
68
  • Our original coteaching model
  • The right idea, the wrong approach

68
69
  • What we did

69
70
  • REVISING OURSELVES!!!
  • Know what you can do, know when you need help
  • At MSC Larry Gloeckler Special
    Education Institute

70
71
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • The 3 stages of team development can take up to
    five years!
  • Beginning Stage teachers are guarded,
    untrusting, unwilling to share, limit
    communication
  • Compromising Stage Communication improves,
    shared resources, willingness to give up some
    control and include partner in planning and
    implementation
  • Collaboration Open communication and
    interaction, mutual administration of duties and
    responsibilities.

71
72
  • Training, training, training
  • Planning, curriculum, instruction, assessment

72
73
Components of Co-Teaching
Co-Teaching is Co-Teaching is not
The general education teacher and special education teacher jointly plan and lead instruction. Both teachers can teach content, modify and adjust instruction, and facilitate instructional activities. One teacher leading and the other teacher serving as a teacher assistant in the class or outside the class completing instructional support activities (facilitating instructional activities assigned by the teacher, copying, making materials, grading papers).
Both teachers are actively engaged with students in the same general education classroom at the same time. A few students with disabilities are pulled off to the side of the class/out of the class on a regular basis to work with the special education teacher.
74
Components of Co-Teaching, continued
Co-Teaching is Co-Teaching is not
The general education teacher and the special education teacher jointly monitor, assess and evaluate student progress. The general education teacher grades all students with some input from the special education teacher about the students with disabilities or the general education teacher grades the general education students and the special education teacher grades the students with disabilities.
Both teachers work together to resolve issues and provide supportive feedback to improve the teaching and learning situation for all students. One teacher takes charge and decides what and how to do everything, including what content will be taught and how it will be taught.
75
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 8 Components of Coteaching Relationships
  • 1. Interpersonal Communication
  • 2. Physical Arrangement
  • 3. Familiarity with the Curriculum
  • 4. Curriculum Goals and Modifications
  • 5. Instructional Planning
  • 6. Instructional Presentation
  • 7. Classroom Management
  • 8. Assessment

76
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 1. Interpersonal Communication
  • An essential component of
  • coteaching
  • Verbal, non verbal, social skills
  • Share ideas, respect differences, appreciate
    humor, model effective communication
  • Student learn to listen, communicate, problem
    solve and negotiate

77
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 2. Physical Arrangement
  • The team designs the space together
  • Avoid seating all special education students
    together
  • Both teacher control space and materials
  • Teachers are aware of each other as they move
    about the room


78
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 3. Familiarity with the Curriculum
  • Both must be competent and confident
  • Both must deliver content
  • Both must understand ways to differentiate

Massachusetts Curriculum Framework
79
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 4. Curriculum Goals and Accommodations
  • Specific goals for each student
  • Both teachers are responsible for the success of
    all students in the room
  • Extensive planning before the start of the school
    year

80
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 5. Instructional Planning
  • Planning must be on-the-spot, day-to-day,
    week-to-week and
  • unit-by-unit
  • Common planning time is essential
  • Special educator is not an assistant
  • Mutual responsibility

81
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 6. Instructional Presentation
  • Both teachers participate in the presentation
  • Provide instruction
  • Structure the learning activities
  • Students address questions and discuss concerns
    with both teachers

82
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 7. Classroom Management
  • 2 major components
  • structure and relationships
  • Environment, rules and routines provide structure
  • Consistency and clarity are essential
  • Individual behavior plans
  • Use of contracts, tangible rewards and reinforcers

83
Improving Student Academic Achievement
coteaching in an Inclusion Setting
  • 8. Assessment
  • Requires a system of evaluating individual
    students
  • Use of alternate assessments
  • Specific progress monitoring
  • Both teachers integrate the goals and objectives
    written into the students IEPs

84
Gately Gately, 2001
85
  • Organizing the Physical Space

One Teaching/One Assisting
Station Teaching
Parallel Teaching
Isherwood, Merhaut, Barger-Anderson, 2007
Alternative Teaching
Team Teaching
86
  • Accommodations made in co-teaching classrooms
  • Pre-teaching
  • Modeling/show expected outcomes
  • Think Alouds
  • Assignment calendars
  • Pairing visual and auditory
  • Teaching directions
  • Skeleton Notes
  • The least you need to know
  • Review Repeat Practice- Teach new skill-
    Practice
  • Organizational Strategies
  • Using Assistive Technology
  • Word Banks to jog memories

86
87
  • INSTRUCTION Co-taughts
  • YEAR English Math
  • 99-00 0 0
  • 02-03 4 0
  • 05-06 12 2
  • 08-09 30 9
  • 09-10 Full Inclusion with supports

87
87
88
ORGANIZATION
  • ISSUES
  • There are several key organizational issues that
    frequently surface in district reviews.

89
ORGANIZATION
  • Site based management, while providing many
    positive advantages to a school district, can
    lead to inconsistent approaches for the most
    struggling students, and a failure to implement
    best practices district wide.

90
ORGANIZATION
  • An amazingly consistent recognition of the lack
    of communication across buildings at the faculty
    level, and particularly between levels (i.e.
    elementary, middle and high school.) This
    impacts struggling learners the most.

91
ORGANIZATION
  • Most curriculum alignment occurred within levels,
    not k-12, resulting in difficult transitions for
    struggling students.

92
ORGANIZATION
  • The extent to which providing data to inform
    instruction is a priority and organized to be
    timely and consistent is a critical factor in
    improved performance (R.T.I).

93
ORGANIZATION
  • When fixed schedules trump student needs, those
    who need special supports are the first affected.

94
ORGANIZATION
  • Models where students with what we call high
    incidence disabilities receive their core
    academic instruction, or spend their
    instructional time primarily in special classes
    should go the way of the dinosaurs.

95
ORGANIZATION
  • In collaborative models, common planning time is
    often lacking. Difficulty in scheduling is
    blamed.

96
ORGANIZATION
  • Staff development support for instruction like
    co-teaching and R.T.I. is often sporadic, and
    suffers from the we did that last year or three
    years ago I think syndrome.

97
ORGANIZATION
  • There is frequently no mechanism to bring new
    players up to date with previous training.

98
  • ORGANIZATION

Are the structures, policies and procedures
helping ALL students be successful?
98
99
We asked two key questions
  • What organizational structures could we use
    differently?
  • What policies and procedures were in place that
    were holding students back?

99
100
  • What we had

100
101
  • MANY issues horrible schedule (only 40 minute
    classes!), separate classes, unequal curriculum,
    defined tracks is that enough???

101
102
  • What we did

102
103
  • We (Restructuring Committee) took each issue on
    one by one

103
104
  • New schedule
  • Aligned curriculum
  • All levels College Prep

104
105
  • CREDIT RECOVERY
  • Classes conducted eight weeks after school
  • Two sessions for each subject per week
  • Classes are no larger than 12 students
  • Curriculum is developed by departments and
  • follows identified skills and standards
  • Lessons are prepared in advance focus on
    instruction
  • Grading pass or fail

105
105
106
  • BOXER 2 - BOXER
  • Seniors in good academic standing register for
    this Independent Study class for credit.
  • Assigned to Freshman Academy and other 9th grade
    classes to work with the academic teacher to
    provide tutoring, mentoring.

106
106
107
  • BOXER BUDDIES
  • Our students volunteer and serve as mentors and
    friends to students with disabilities in the
    middle and elementary schools.

107
107
108
  • SO, did it work??? Was there improvement???

108
109
Proficiency Index-SPED ELA-Mass. Urbans
District Grade Band Sub Grp  ELA 2003  ELA 2004  ELA 2005  ELA 2006  ELA 2007  ELA 2008 Gain
Brockton Grd 10 SPED 51.3 50.2 54.0 61.8 63.3 70.4 19.2
Boston Grd 10 SPED 39.3 43.2 48.2 51.6 56.8 64.5 25.2
Worcester Grd 10 SPED 44.9 47.2 48.6 56.1 57.4 63.7 18.8
Lowell Grd 10 SPED 46.5 47.4 41.4 45.4 62.7 60.7 14.2
Fall River Grd 10 SPED 36.4 45.9 40.5 43.8 49.7 60.0 23.6
Lynn Grd 10 SPED 47.7 45.0 45.2 54.5 57.3 59.8 12.1
Springfield Grd 10 SPED 41.0 40.5 48.8 46.7 49.6 59.7 18.7
Lawrence Grd 10 SPED 33.0 50.8 47.0 48.8 42.8 50.2 17.2
New Bedford Grd 10 SPED 35.1 36.4 42.2 48.2 45.7 48.6 13.5
109
110
Proficiency Index ELA - Mass. Urbans
District Grade Band Sub Grp  ELA 2003  ELA 2004  ELA 2005  ELA 2006  ELA 2007  ELA 2008 Gain
Brockton Grd 10 Agg 76.4 78.1 79.2 84.0 83.2 88 11.6
Lynn Grd 10 Agg 70.5 70.7 73.0 77.2 78.1 82.7 12.2
Worcester Grd 10 Agg 67.9 68.6 71.8 75.3 79.3 82.6 14.7
Boston Grd 10 Agg 64.4 67.7 69.7 76.5 78.1 82.3 17.9
Lowell Grd 10 Agg 69.8 74.2 73.6 76.4 78.9 81.4 11.6
Fall River Grd 10 Agg 69.8 71.7 72.1 72.6 81.4 79.2 9.4
New Bedford Grd 10 Agg 66.1 69.1 70.5 74.3 74.5 78.2 12.1
Springfield Grd 10 Agg 62.1 65.6 66.7 67.3 69.7 76.7 14.6
Brockton Grd 10 SPED 51.3 50.2 54.0 61.8 63.3 70.4 19.2
Lawrence Grd 10 Agg 59.9 58.3 63.6 61.4 61.9 69.2 9.3
110
111
  • But its much more than just the numbers...

111
112
  • Changing Attitudes
  • Everyone is responsible for every student
  • Believing that every student CAN and MUST
  • Our responsibility to figure out how to help

112
112
113
  • Ownership
  • Expectations
  • Intervention Systems
  • Inclusion/Collaborative teaching
  • Organization

Key Elements to Improve Performance for Students
Receiving Special Education Services
114
Strategies for K-8 Students and Strategies for
High School Students with Disabilities in the
General Education Curriculum
Preview at Resource Center or visit
http//store.leadered.com
115
Improving Results for Students with Disabilities
Workshops and Training
  • Supporting a Rigorous and Relevant Special
    Education Program
  • Connecting Talents of General Education and
    Special Education Teachers
  • Developing Intervention Systems
  • Brain-Compatible Strategies for Special Education
    Students

116
Lawrence Gloeckler, Executive Director Special
Education Institute International Center for
Leadership in Education, Inc.
  • 1587 Route 146
  • Rexford, NY 12148
  • Phone (518) 399-2776
  • Fax (518) 399-7607
  • E-mail larry_at_LeaderEd.com
  • www.LeaderEd.com
About PowerShow.com