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Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies in the Workplace

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Title: Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies in the Workplace


1
Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies in
the Workplace January 31, 2008
Presented to THE GLOBAL EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE
FOURM Mumbai, India By Dr. Robert
Emmerling Competency International Web
www.CompetencyInternational.com Email
Emmerling_at_sbcglobal.net
2
THE NEW WORLD ORDER
  • Never has the world seen change..
  • Occur so rapidly
  • So completely
  • And on such a global scale
  • Simply put, we may be living through the
    greatest change in human history.

3
THE NEW BUSINESS ENVIORNMENT
Structure Hierarchy Matrix
Process Delegate Collaborate
Domain Local Global
Change Stable Dynamic
4
THE NEW BUSINESS ENVIORNMENT
  • The new global reality requires we rethink some
    of our assumptions about leadership

5
EI Competencies and Traditional IQ
  • American Psychologist (1973)
  • Testing for Competence Rather Than Intelligence
  • IQ tests are good predictors of academic
    performance but not job performance or life
    satisfaction
  • Journal of Applied Psychology (2004)
  • Correlated IQ with perceptions of leadership
    effectiveness and objective results of leaders
  • Meta-Analysis of 151 independent samples
  • What did they find?
  • Overall, results suggest that the relationship
    between intelligence and leadership is
    considerably lower than previously thought.

6
Distribution of IQ
7
Competencies and Performance
Emotional and Social Intelligence Competencies
(Star Qualities)
Threshold Requirements
Technical Functional Skills
IQ
8
The Business Case for EI-based Competencies
  • Research shows that IQ accounts for between 4
    and 25 of job performance.
  • Research on 181 jobs at 121 companies worldwide
    showed that 2 out of 3 abilities vital for
    success were EI-Based Competencies
  • Research reviewed by Dr. Goleman shows that these
    competencies become even more predictive the more
    senior the leader
  • Primary reason employees leave organizations is
    due to relationship issues with their boss

9
What is SUPERIOR Performance Worth?
  • Increases with Job Complexity

PRODUCTIVITY Average Job
Complexity 1 S.D. above mean
100 Low 19 119
Moderate 32 132
High 48 148 Sales
48-120 148-220
Threshold or adequate minimum acceptable
SUPERIOR performance Top 1 in 10 in a job
-1S.D. 1 S.D.
0 13.5 50
86.5 100
Percent of People in a Job
10
Competency Defined
An underlying characteristic of a person that
leads to or causes effective or superior
performance
11
GOLEMAN MODEL OF EI COMPETENCIES
Social Awareness
Self- Awareness
  • Empathy
  • Organizational Awareness
  • Service Orientation
  • Emotional Self-Awareness
  • Accurate Self-Assessment
  • Self-Confidence

Self- Management
Relationship Management
  • Developing Others
  • Leadership
  • Influence
  • Communication
  • Change Catalyst
  • Conflict Management
  • Building Bonds
  • Teamwork Collaboration
  • Self-Control
  • Trustworthiness
  • Conscientiousness
  • Adaptability
  • Achievement Orientation
  • Initiative

12
COMPETENCY EXAMPLE TEAMWORK
  • Implies the intention to work cooperatively
    with others, to be part of a team, to work
    together, as a member of a group (rather than as
    a leader) as opposed to working separately or
    competitively.

1. Co-operates with others
2. Shares information
3. Expresses positive expectations
4. Solicits input from others
5. Empowers others
6. Resolves team conflicts
Degree of Complexity
Complexity of behavior and understanding increase
as competency level increases
13
Steps in Establishing EI-Competency Models
  • 1. DEFINE PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
  • Profit, Productivity, Client Outcomes, etc.
  • 2. IDENTIFY CRITERION SAMPLE
  • BEST performerstop 15--v. average
  • 3. COLLECT DATA
  • Collect data using Behavioral Event Interviewing
    (BEI)
  • 4. INDENTIFY DISTINGUISHING COMPETENCIES
  • Statistical Analysis of Data
  • 5. CONSTRUCT A COMPETENCY MODEL
  • Use precise behavioral descriptions and identify
    Target Levels
  • 6. VALIDATE THE MODEL
  • Concurrent and predictive validity studies
  • 7. CREATE AND DEPLOY APPLICATIONS
  • Selection, training, performance management,
    succession planning, etc.

14
Define Performance Criteria and Study Sample
  • Performance ratings or nomination Criterion
    samples are determined on the basis of
    performance ratings or nominated by supervisors,
    peers and/or direct reports.
  • Productivity or effectiveness measures Criterion
    samples are determined by objective data related
    to productivity or performance.
  • Case Example A major multinational industrial
    firm used profit of the business units managed by
    individual executives as the primary measure of
    executive effectiveness.
  • Case Example Ameriprise Financial Advisors used
    client portfolio performance as the criteria of
    effectiveness for financial advisors.

15
Case Example Major Industrial Firm
VARIALBE MEAN 1 SD SUPERIOR (1SD)
Revenue 17.02M 12.82M 29.84M
Profit Margin 5.33 5.66 10.99
Profit 1.26M 1.69M 2.95M
  • Initial research found Achievement Orientation,
    Initiative, Service Orientation,
    Influence, Directiveness, Developing Others, Self
    Confidence were related to profit
  • Validation research showed that the competencies
    in the original model were able to predict
    27 of the variance in profit measured 2 years
    after competencies were initially assessed
    using BEI
  • Cross cultural research showed that these same
    competencies predicted performance equally
    well in 2 European countries and the United
    States

16
Case Example Major Industrial Firm
Group Revenue Increase Return on Sales Increase Profit Increase
Trained Group 3.117M 0.3 249,000
Control group 1.660M 0.7 192,000
Difference 1.457M - 0.4 57,000
p (t- test) lt .04 n.s. lt .02
  • Training was targeted on the competencies
    identified in the study and consisted of
    feedback based on individual BEI results,
    competency-based training, goal setting,
    and action learning.
  • Return on investment was calculated to be 613

17
BEST PRACTICES FOR DEVELOPING EI
  • Why Guidelines Were Developed
  • Provide guidance for researchers and
    practitioners
  • Distinguish developing EI from traditional forms
    of learning
  • How Guidelines Were Developed
  • Evaluation of Model Programs
  • Literature Review
  • Expert opinion

18
BRINGING EI TO THE WORKPLACE

Preparation Training Transfer Evaluation
Assess Org. Needs
Foster Positive Relations Between Learners
and Trainers
Assess Individuals
Encourage Use of Skills on-the-Job
Self-Directed Learning
Provide Feedback Carefully
Set Clear Goals
Motivation
Break Goals into Manageable Steps
Evaluation
Maximize Learner Choice
Learning
Provide an Organizational Culture That Supports
Learning
Improved Performance
Provide Opportunity to Practice
Encourage Participation
Provide Feedback on Practice
Link Learning EQ to Personal Values
Remove Situational Constraints
Experiential Methods
Adjust Expectations
Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence
in Organizations www.eiconsortium.org Authors
Cherniss, Goleman, Emmerling, Cowan, Adler
Enhance Insight
Gauge Readiness
Prepare Learners for Setbacks
19
TWO KINDS OF LEARNING
  • Cognitive / Technical
  • Learning is centered primarily in the neocortex
  • Involves fitting new information into existing
    frameworks
  • Learning can occur relatively quickly
  • Social and Emotional Learning
  • Learning takes place in several areas of the
    brain
  • Learning requires both cognitive and emotional
    learning
  • Involves changing things that can be central to
    our identities - the way we think, feel, and act.
  • Learning occurs over a period of time

20
Paving the Way for Change
GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING EI
  • Understand organizational and individual needs
  • Deliver assessment results carefully
  • Make it a personal journey
  • Set realistic expectations change can happen
    but it wont happen overnight

21
Doing the Work of Change
GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING EI
  • Foster positive relationships
  • Set S.M.A.R.T goals for developing EI
  • Use experiential methods and allow for practice
    and frequent feedback
  • Spread training over time to allow people to
    practice on-the-job
  • Prepare people for setbacks

22
Transfer and Maintenance of Change
GUIDELINES FOR DEVELOPING EI
  • Encourage use of skills on the job
  • Develop an organizational culture that supports
    social and emotional learning
  • Evaluate

23
Additional Resources and References
Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations www.EIConsortium.org Competency International www.CompetencyInternational.com
References Boyatzis, R.E., (1982). The Competent Manager A Model for Effective Performance, John Wiley Sons, NY. Boyatzis, R. McKee, A., (2005). Resonant Leadership Sustaining Yourself and Connecting with Others Through Mindfulness, Hope, and Compassion, Harvard Business School Press, Boston. Boyatzis, R.E., Sala, F., (2004). Assessing emotional intelligence competencies. In Glenn Geher (ed.), The Measurement of Emotional Intelligence. Novas Science Publishers, Hauppauge, NY. Emmerling, R. J. Goleman, D. (2003). Emotional intelligence Issues and common misunderstandings. Issues and Recent Developments in Emotional Intelligence. Available online www.eiconsoritum.org. Goleman, D. (1998). Working with Emotional Intelligence. Bantam, NY. Goleman, D., Boyatzis, R.E., McKee, A., (2002). Primal Leadership Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence. Harvard Business School Press, Boston. Hunter, J. E., Schmidt, F. L., Judiesch, M. K. (1990) ). Individual differences in output variability as a function of job complexity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 75(1), 28-42.
24
Additional Resources and References
References Judge, T. A, Colbert, A. E, Ilies, R. (2004). Intelligence and Leadership A Quantitative Review and Test of Theoretical Propositions. Journal of Applied Psychology, 89(3), 542-552. McClelland, D.C. (1973). Testing for competence rather than intelligence. American Psychologist, 28(1), 1-40. McClelland, D.C. (1998). Identifying Competencies Using Behavioral Event Interviews. Psychological Science, 9, 331-339. Spencer, L.M. Spencer, S.M. (1993). Competence at Work Models for Superior Performance, John Wiley Sons NY. Spencer, L. M., Emmerling, R. J., Peterson, K. Lennick Aberman Group (2007). Emotional Intelligence Competencies of Financial Advisors That Deliver Superior Client Portfolio Performance. White paper available online at www.CompetencyInternational.com. Spencer, L. M., Ryan, G., Bernhard, U. (2008). Cross-cultural Competencies in a Major Multinational Industrial Firm. In R. Emmerling, V. Shanwal, M. Mandal (Eds), Emotional Intelligence Theoretical and Cultural Perspectives. Hauppauge, NY Nova Science Publishers. Spencer, L.M. (2001). The economic value of emotional intelligence competencies and EIC-based HR programs. In Goleman, D. and C. Cherniss. (Eds.). The Emotionally Intelligent Workplace How to Select for, Measure, and Improve Emotional Intelligence in Individuals, Groups, and Organizations. San Francisco, CA Jossey-Bass.
Contact Information Emmerling_at_sbcglobal.net
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