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Principles of Effective Collaboration

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Principles of Effective Collaboration Success Strategies in the Inclusive Classroom Module 2 Effective Collaboration Effective collaborative is a professional ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Principles of Effective Collaboration


1
Principles of Effective Collaboration
  • Success Strategies in the Inclusive Classroom
  • Module 2

2
Effective Collaboration
  • Effective collaborative is a professional
    partnership between two or more educators that
    erases traditional boundaries and allows them to
    make informed decisions when designing,
    communicating, and monitoring effective
    instruction through reflective teaching.
  • Whitten Hoekstra, 2002

3
Why collaborate?
  • Collaboration
  • Increases instructional options
  • Increases grouping flexibility in order to
    provide student with individualized instruction
    and diverse learning experiences
  • Reduces stigma for children
  • Increases professional support
  • Meets the mandates of IDEA Least Restrictive
    Environment

4
Four Principles that Promote Effective
Collaboration
  1. Respect of Knowledge/Skill
  2. Established Communication System
  3. Common Understanding of the Classroom Environment
  4. Co-Accountability

5
1. Respect of Knowledge/Skill
  • Recognition that each educator brings a set of
    knowledge and skills
  • Both educators take an active role in supporting
    student learning
  • Mutual trust
  • How is this illustrated? What does it look like?

6
2. Established Communication System
  • Designated time to discuss student learning
    goals, accommodations, and instructional tools
    and strategies
  • Communication about teacher roles and
    responsibilities
  • Interpersonal awareness and comfort with
    discussing the professional relationship
  • What examples of an effective communication
    system have you seen in action?
  • Listening to understand the perspectives of your
    professional partner

7
3. Common Understanding of the Classroom
Environment
  • Shared understanding about classroom management,
    grading, the physical arrangement, familiarity
    with the curriculum, and implementing
    accommodations
  • Mutual ownership and expectations for student
    learning
  • High acceptance for all students
  • Describe an instance when a common understanding
    of the classroom environment was not established?

8
4. Co-Accountability
  • Shared sense of responsibility to ensure access,
    involvement, and progress in the general
    education curriculum
  • Joint implementation of accommodations
  • Co-planning, co-preparation, co-evaluation
  • Classroom ScenarioHow would a team
    demonstrating co-accountability respond to this
    situation? How would their response differ from
    a team that does not practice co-accountability?

9
Typical Role of the Special Educator
  • Learning strategist for all students
  • Motivational techniques
  • Curriculum adaptations
  • Knowledge IEPs and student disabilities

10
Typical Role of the General Educator
  • Content knowledge
  • District and state curriculum
  • Indicators and objectives
  • Pacing
  • Content development
  • Classroom management for a standard class size

11
Typical Role of Paraprofessionals
  • Check the students progress
  • Provide individual or small-group tutorial
    assistance
  • Assist the classroom teacher
  • Report back to the special education teacher

12
Venn Diagram Activity
  • Role of special educator
  • Role of general educator
  • Where the roles overlap

13
Consultation Model
  • Students are grouped heterogeneously.
  • General Educator presents instruction.
  • Special Educator adapts instructional materials
    as needed according to students needs. Other
    services include assessment, observation, and
    planning meetings.
  • Special Educators and General Educators make time
    to discuss students needs and services.

14
Consultation Model
  • Strengths
  • Challenges

15
Collaborative Teaching
  • Students are grouped heterogeneously.
  • General Educator and Special Educator collaborate
    in the same classroom setting.
  • Collaborative Teaching Models
  • One Teaching, One Assisting
  • Station Teaching
  • Parallel Teaching
  • Alternative Teaching
  • Team Teaching

16
One Teaching, One Assisting
  • Both educators are present with one taking a
    clear lead in the classroom while other observes
    and assists students.

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17
One Teaching, One Assisting
  • Strengths
  • Limited teacher planning
  • Provides basic support to students with diverse
    needs
  • Challenges
  • The assist teacher may feel like a glorified
    teachers assistant
  • Students may question the assist teachers
    authority

Consider having the general educator and special
educator alternate roles between support teacher
and lead teacher.
18
Station Teaching
  • Teachers divide instructional content into
    several segments and present the content in
    separate stations around the classroom.
  • With two stations, the General Educator and
    Special Educator each teach their half of the
    content and then switch groups. Alternatively,
    both teachers may move between groups in order to
    provide support.
  • If students are able to work independently with
    content, a third station may be established.

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19
Station Teaching
  • Strengths
  • General Educator and Special Educator maintain
    equal status
  • Co planning allows for both the General Educator
    and the Special Educator to provide input in
    their area of expertise
  • Challenges
  • This approach requires significant pre-planning
    in order to divide up the content
  • The content in Station Teaching lessons cannot be
    dependent on the order in which content is being
    presented due to the student rotation

20
Parallel Teaching
  • General Educator and Special Educator plan
    instruction jointly, but each delivers
    instruction to a heterogeneous group consisting
    of approximately half the class.

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21
Parallel Teaching
  • Strengths
  • Lowers student to teacher ratio
  • Allows for increased student interaction and/or
    student to student interaction
  • Allows the teacher to monitor individual student
    progress and understanding more closely
  • Challenges
  • General Educator and Special Educator need to
    coordinate teaching so that students receive
    essentially the same instruction within the same
    amount of time
  • Noise levels may be high

22
Alternative Teaching
  • One teacher works with a small group while the
    other teacher interacts with the larger group.
  • Small groups can be pulled for pre-teaching,
    re-teaching, enrichment, interest groups, special
    projects, make-up work or assessment groups.

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23
Alternative Teaching
  • Strengths
  • All students, including students with
    disabilities, benefit from small group
    instruction.
  • If the General Educator and Special Educator
    alternate roles, equal status is maintained.
  • Challenges
  • Be careful to pull small learning groups that
    span various purposes. The small learning groups
    should not always be your Students with Special
    Needs.

Consider having the general educator and special
educator alternate roles between support teacher
and lead teacher.
24
Team Teaching
  • Both the General Educator and the Special
    Educator share the instruction of students.
  • One teacher may lead discussion while the other
    models or demonstrates.
  • Team teaching affords the ability to model
    quality team and interpersonal interactions.

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25
Team Teaching
  • Strengths
  • Allows both teachers to blend their teachings
    styles and expertise
  • Challenges
  • Requires more planning
  • Requires high levels of trust and commitment

26
How do teachers decide which model to implement?
  • Lesson objectives

27
  • Much like the effective doubles team in tennis,
    when one teacher moves to the left of the room,
    the other moves more to the middle of the room
    so that the classroom is always effectively
    covered.
  • Understanding Co -Teaching Components, CEC,
    2001

28
Additional Resources on Co-Teaching
  • Common Co-Teaching Issues. Retrieved from
    http//www.ttac.odu.edu/articles/comcotch.html
  • Co-Teaching. Retrieved from http//coe.jmu.edu/es
    c/Consortium_Co-Teaching.shtml
  • Gately, Susan and Frank Gately. (March/April2001)
    Understanding Coteaching Components. The Council
    for Exceptional Children. Retrieved from
    http//journals.cec.sped.org/EC/Archive_Articles/V
    OL.33NO.4MARAPR2001_TEC_Article6.pdf
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