Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education System The Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment National Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st September 2004 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education System The Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment National Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st September 2004 PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 571fa3-YjBmN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education System The Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment National Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st September 2004

Description:

Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education System The Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment National Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:351
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education System The Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment National Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st September 2004


1
Towards a High Excellence,High Equity Education
SystemThe Association for Achievement and
Improvement through AssessmentNational
Conference Brighton, Tuesday 21st September 2004
Professor David HopkinsChief Adviser on School
Standards, DfES
2
Policies to Drive School Improvement
Intervention in inverse proportion to success
Ambitious Standards
High Challenge High Support
Devolved responsibility
Accountability
Access to best practice and quality professional
development
Good data and clear targets
3
(No Transcript)
4
(No Transcript)
5
4

6
Distribution of Reading Achievement in 9-10 year
olds in 2001
575
550
525
500
475
450
425
400
375
350
325
300
Italy
Israel
Latvia
Belize
France
Greece
Iceland
Cyprus
Turkey
Kuwait
Norway
Sweden
England
Hungary
Bulgaria
Germany
Slovenia
Morocco
Lithuania
Scotland
Romania
Colombia
Argentina
Singapore
Netherlands
New Zealand
United States
Czech Republic
Hong Kong SAR
Slovak Republic
Moldova, Rep of
International Avg.
Macedonia, Rep of
Russian Federation
Iran, Islamic Rep of
Canada (Ontario,Quebec)
Source PIRLS 2001 International Report IEAs
Study of Reading Literacy Achievement in Primary
Schools
7
Percentage of pupils achieving level 4 or above
in Key Stage 2 tests 1998-2004
English
Maths
80
75
70
Percentage
65
60
55
50
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
  • Test changes in 2003
  • Major changes to writing test/markscheme
  • Significant changes to maths papers

8
Key Stage 3 Test Results
100
80
English
60
Maths
Science
40
ICT
20
0
2001 L5
2001 L6
2002 L5
2002 L6
2003 L5
2003 L6
2007 target
2004 target
based on teacher assessment
9
GCSE Percentage of pupils achieving 5A-C grades
54
52.9
51.6
52
50
49.2
50
47.9
48
Percentage
46.3
46
45.1
44
42
40
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
Year
10
PISA 2001 Mean Score in Student Performance on
the Combined Reading Literacy Scale
Finland
Canada
New Zealand
Australia
Ireland
Korea
United Kingdom
Japan
Sweden
Iceland
Belgium
Austria
Norway
France
United States
Denmark
Switzerland
Spain
Czech Republic
Italy
Germany
Hungary
Poland
Greece
Portugal
Luxembourg
Mexico
300
320
340
360
380
400
420
440
460
480
500
520
540
560
Source OECD, Programme for International Student
Assessment (PISA)
11
Towards a High Excellence, High Equity Education
System
560
  • High excellence
  • Low equity
  • High excellence
  • High equity
  • Finland

540
  • Canada
  • U.K.
  • Korea
  • Japan

520
  • U.S.
  • Belgium

500
  • Mean performance in reading literacy
  • Spain
  • Switzerland
  • Germany

480
  • Poland

460
440
  • Low excellence
  • High equity
  • Low excellence
  • Low equity

420
60
80
100
120
140
  • 200 Variance (variance OECD as a whole 100)

Source OECD (2001) Knowledge and Skills for Life
12
Achieving the High Excellence, High Equity System
National Prescription
Schools Leading Reform
a b
c
Personalised Learning
13
Real Clarity of Purpose
  • Personalised learning, enriched curriculum, whole
    child
  • Strong institutions committed to excellence and
    equity
  • A synchronised system generating its own momentum
    for reform
  • The whole enterprise capturing the heads and
    minds of the nation

14
Adding value to the learning journey
I get to learn lots of interesting and different
subjects
I know what my learning objectives are and feel
in control of my learning
I can get a level 4 in English and Maths before I
go to secondary school
I know what good work looks like and can help
myself to learn
I know if I need extra help or to be challenged
to do better I will get the right support
My parents are involved with the school and I
feel I belong here
I can work well with and learn from many others
as well as my teacher
I know how I am being assessed and what I need to
do to improve my work
I can get the job that I want
I enjoy using ICT and know how it can help my
learning
All these . whatever my background, whatever my
abilities, wherever I start from
15
Personalisation and Personalised Learning
  • Personalisation has the potential to transform
    public services, but to unlock that potential the
    idea needs to involve the integration of two key,
    and contrasting, approaches
  • Teachers and educational professionals must
    deploy their knowledge and skills in a timely and
    effective way to provide a more differentiated
    offer for the student.
  • At the same time the system must build up the
    knowledge and confidence of students (and their
    parents) to take responsibility for their own
    learning.

16
The Five Components of Personalised Learning
We need to engage parents and pupils in a
partnership with professional teachers and
support staff to deliver tailor made services
to embrace individual choice within as well as
between schools and to make it meaningful through
public sector reform that gives citizens voice
and professional flexibility (David Miliband, 18
May 2004)
17
The School as a Personalised Learning Organisation
  • PMDU claim that a school effective at
    Personalised Learning focuses on
  • Focus on leadership and management of teaching
    and learning
  • CPD including peer observation and coaching
  • Making full use of the Primary / KS3 Strategies
  • Focusing improvement activity on evidence of
    performance
  • Making use of workforce reforms and new
    technologies
  • Networks and collaboration to support school
    improvement

18
New Relationship with Schools Purpose
  • David Miliband, Minister for Schools, 9 January
    2004
  • a new relationship between DfES, LEA and schools
    that
  • strips out clutter and duplication
  • aligns national and local priorities
  • releases greater local initiative and energy.

19
The Main Changes
  • SELF-EVALUATION
  • continuous, searching, objective how students
    progress and how core systems are working
  • INSPECTION
  • short and focussed review of the
    fundamentals of a schools performance and
    systems . every 3 years very short notice
  • SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PARTNER
  • credible practitioner in many cases with
    current or recent secondary headship experience
    a critical friend
  • SINGLE CONVERSATION
  • about schools priorities, targets, support
    needs. reduce multiple accountabilities
    reengineer DfES and LEA programmes
  • PROFILE
  • reflecting the breadth and depth of what
    schools do
  • DATA
  • collected once, used many times
  • COMMUNICATIONS
  • information that schools need, when they
    need Amazon-style online ordering

20
School Improvement
Teaching and Learning
Personalised Learning
System Wide Reform
21
Core Principles System Wide Reform
  • Be based on clear values a commitment to the
    success of every learner
  • Develop a system that is coherent for learners at
    every level
  • Build front-line capacity by developing power and
    resources to the local level
  • Establish an intelligent accountability framework
  • Strengthen diversity, collaboration and
    innovation
  • Develop local and regional capacity for
    professional support and challenge

22
Learning Systems
Learning Schools
Learning Classrooms
PERSONALISED LEARNING
Fit for purpose systems are available to collect
and make intelligent use of data linking it to
teaching and learning
Marking policies and schemes of work promote
formative assessment
Pupils have personal targets based on data and
dialogue involving learners, parents, teachers
and mentors
Assessment for Learning
ITT and CPD equip staff in schools with the
skills to match teaching to the needs of learners
ICT enhances creativity, extends opportunities
and accommodate different paces
Lessons build on the learners knowledge and
multiple intelligence. Learning skills taught
explicitly.
Teaching, Learning and ICT
Freedoms and flexibilities within the curriculum
explicit and re-engineered key stage strategies
with tools and materials to support AfL
Choice of learning goals across the curriculum
with minimum entitlements
Enquiry into subjects through self directed
project based work
Enabling Curriculum Choice
Empowered leaders within a culture which enables
Professional judgment to be exercised to best
meet the needs of every child.
Pupils and parents have a strong voice and their
needs are at the heart of the school
Personalised tutorial where learners discuss
progress and learning needs with a consistent
adult
Organising the School
Work inside and outside the classroom valued and
developed cohesively
Networking and engaging with the community
Infrastructure to support networks and
collaborations and the sharing of good practice
in place. New wider accountabilities from Every
Child Matters.
Parents and carers proactively involved and the
school leasing with local agencies and
organisations
23
(No Transcript)
24
The Five Priorities
  • Supporting the education welfare of the whole
    child
  • Continuing the drive in primary education
  • Widening choice increasing achievement in
    secondary Further Education
  • Reducing the historic deficit in adult skills
  • Sustaining an excellent university sector

25
Key Principles for Reform
  • Greater personalisation choice
  • Opening up services and new ways of delivery
  • Freedom independence
  • A major commitment to staff development
  • Partnerships

26
Primary EducationExcellence and Enjoyment for
every primary child
  • The best in the basics
  • Better teaching more personalised support for
    each child whatever their needs
  • A richer curriculum
  • Primary consultant leaders
  • Extended schools offering wrap around childcare
  • National system of primary networks

27
Independent Specialist SchoolsMore choice for
parent and pupils independence for schools
  • Guaranteed 3-year budgets for every school from
    2006
  • Universal specialist schools and greater freedom
    for all secondary schools
  • A new relationship with schools
  • 200 Academies by 2010
  • Foundation Partnerships and greater flexibility
    to combine school, college work-based training
  • Every secondary school to be refurbished or
    rebuilt over the next 10 15 years

28
Personalisation and ChoiceEvery young person
achieving their full potential
  • A smooth transition from primary to secondary
  • Teaching based on knowledge of individual pupils
    (AfL)
  • CPD and workforce reform focussed on teaching and
    learning
  • Better management of behaviour and inclusion,
    step-change in school attendance with schools at
    the heart of their communities
  • Improved vocational work-based routes (14-19),
    with better earlier employer involvement
  • Every young person able to develop the skills
    they need for employment for life

29
  • It is teachers who, in the end, will change the
    world of the school by understanding it.
  • A quotation from Lawrence Stenhouse chosen by
    some teachers who had worked with him as an
    inscription for the memorial plaque in the
    grounds of the University of East Anglia.
About PowerShow.com