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CONCURRENT PLANNING SERIES, Part IV of IV: FAMILY-CENTERED APPROACH

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Title: Developing & Implementing a Concurrent Permanency Plan Author: D037361 Last modified by: Arizona Supreme Court Created Date: 1/27/2009 8:47:16 PM – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CONCURRENT PLANNING SERIES, Part IV of IV: FAMILY-CENTERED APPROACH


1
CONCURRENT PLANNING SERIES, Part IV of
IVFAMILY-CENTERED APPROACH
  • Kylah Ross, MSW Sandra Lescoe, MSW
  • Child Welfare Training Institute DES DCYF Policy
  • August, 2009
  • In collaboration with Ann E. MacEachron
  • Professor, School of Social Work,
  • College of Public Programs, ASU Downtown Campus

2
Directions
  • Full directions are on the website. Click the
    icon for video-camera to switch between the
    short long control panels. The short control
    panel has buttons like a VCR. The long control
    panel allows for scrolling, and shows the exact
    time for each slide and the presentation
  • At the end of each session, there is a required
    survey to show that you have completed the
    training to receive credit, and then an optional
    feedback form. Thank you!

3
Part III Table of Contents
  • 1. Start at the Beginning
  • 2. Ambivalence
  • 3. Conversations
  • 4. Process of Communicating
  • 5. Essential Topics
  • A. Child safety
  • B. Family changes
  • C. Supports services
  • D. Permanency options
  • 6. Practice Question

4
1. Start at the Beginning
  • How and when do we have a conversation with
    birth parents about Concurrent Planning?
  • From the very beginning!

5
Beginning
  • Think about what needs to occur to ensure a
    permanent family is ready and able to care for
    the child
  • What are the childs special circumstances or
    needs?
  • What activities could you begin right now to
    prepare for this possibility?

6
2. Ambivalence Recognizing
  • Redefine Success-Permanency for children
  • Listen for clues with parents about
  • Statements regarding relinquishments
  • Previous relinquishment of a child
  • Statements about not wanting to parent or being
    incapable of parenting
  • Negative comments about the child

7
Ambivalence Exploring
  • Exploring and sorting out the clues with parents
  • Look at your own biases about giving up a child
    and seeking clarity about clients right to
    resolve things this way
  • Assume respect for the parents decisions,
    allowing them some control over the outcome of
    their childs life
  • Promote the relationship between the birth
    parents and resource parents

8
Ambivalence Exploring
  • When a parent raises issues related to
    relinquishment, avoid trying to immediately
    reassure them that this is a right or wrong
    decision
  • Ask open ended questions to explore the parents
    fantasies about who can parent the child better
    or where or with whom the child would be better
    off with

9
Ambivalence Resolving
  • Help the parent follow-through on the decisions
    they made
  • If a parent decides on relinquishment, respect
    his/her decision
  • When possible, a supportive relationship between
    the birth family and the resource family to
    maintain connections is optimal

10
Ambivalence Resolving
  • Adoptive families need to understand how grief
    and loss will impact the child through the
    developmental life stages, so they make wise
    decisions about continued involvement of birth
    parents in the life of the child

11
3. Conversations
  • Think for a moment about a conversation you may
    have had with birth parents when you were
    implementing Concurrent Planning activities?
  • How did it go?
  • What did you do that helped the birth parent
    understand that our goal is to work with them
    towards reunification?

12
Multiple Conversations
  • Conversations need to be held with birth parents,
    resource parents and children if applicable from
    the very start
  • The tone of that conversation can make all the
    difference in the progress of the case

13
4. Process of Communicating
  • Talking listening to birth families about the
    need for Concurrent Planning
  • Talking listening to children about their needs
    desires
  • Talking listening to kin and/or traditional
    resource parents and Tribes about their
    willingness to provide permanent care of the child

14
Communicating
  • Ensuring that potential and current caregivers
    are prepared to care for the child on a permanent
    basis if needed
  • For example, does the child have any special
    needs?
  • What is the make-up and fit of the potential
    care-giving family?

15
Communicating
  • Ongoing communication is critical for successful
    reunification

16
5. Essential Topics
  • .

17
Essential Topics
  • Essential topics in ongoing conversations
    include
  • Child Safety
  • Family Change in Behavior and/or Conditions
  • Supports and Services
  • Permanency Options

18
A. Child Safety
  • A parent needs to know exactly whats expected
    of him/her in order for the children to be
    reunified
  • Explain why the child is unsafe.
  • Check to ensure their understanding

19
Engaging the Family
  • Always explore how the family feels about CPS
    being involved in their life
  • What is the family's perspective regarding their
    involvement with CPS?
  • Begin rapport-building by having conversations
    with the parents about their views and fears
    about CPS and allow the parents time to share and
    to be heard
  • If we truly hear what they have to say, it will
    give us a better understanding of how they think
    and feel, thus engaging them in the process of
    change

20
Engaging
  • Learn about how the family views the decisions
    made by CPS
  • This also gives us a better idea if they
    understand truly why and how their actions caused
    the child to be unsafe
  • What does the family believe about the situation?
  • In order to gather this information, we must
    engage them in a discussion about their feelings,
    thoughts, and beliefs about CPS, the fact that
    their children are in care, etc.

21
B. Family Change Behaviors
  • Clearly explain what behavioral changes the
    parents must demonstrate to ensure the children
    will be safe in their care
  • This is a good opportunity to discuss again what
    parents understand about
  • why the children are in care, and
  • what behavioral changes s/he must make for
    reunification to occur

22
Family Change Services
  • When we learn about the familys thoughts,
    beliefs, feelings, and what their formal and
    informal supports are, we learn about what kinds
    of services would be most effective to help the
    family change the behaviors or conditions that
    cause the child to be unsafe

23
Family Change Timely
  • Knowing the clock is ticking may actually help
    motivate the family toward change
  • Sometimes having this difficult talk with birth
    parents helps them work harder at correcting the
    behaviors that caused their children to be unsafe

24
C. Supports and Services
  • Identify who can support the parents and the
    children during this difficult time.
  • This may include
  • relatives,
  • friends,
  • formal supports,
  • community support,
  • churches and their members, etc.

25
Supports Why?
  • By pulling in all the family supports, the team
    can come up with the best plan for the child to
    ensure
  • safety,
  • stability,
  • consistency,
  • permanency, and
  • support for the parents to work towards
    reunification

26
Supports
  • Relatives need to be looked at for more than
    placement. They are a support system for
    children and families
  • So many times we search for relatives only in the
    beginning of a case for placement. But we need
    to identify and look for relatives throughout the
    life of a caseeven if a relative isnt assessed
    as an adequate placement, they may still be a
    support system. They are still family.

27
D. Permanency Options
  • It is critical to continually discuss all
    permanency options with the family
  • It is equally important to emphasize your
    alignment with the birth family and in helping
    them reunify with their children

28
Practice Question
  • When children are placed in out-of-home care,
    what do we actively do to reunify them with their
    parent?
  • Think about the efforts youve made to actively
    work to reunify children with their parents.
  • What steps did you take?
  • What activities?
  • What worked well and helped the case along?

29
Tone
  • Emphasize that all your interactions with the
    family, providers, and temporary caregivers are
    focused on helping the family get their children
    home
  • Let them know that your goal is to continue
    working on the plan of reunification until the
    Court orders a different permanency goal for the
    child. Just because we are implementing
    activities towards a simultaneous plan does not
    take the focus off of reunification

30
But
  • Parents many times think that CPS has already
    made up its mind about the track a case will
    take. CPS is viewed negatively many times. Lots
    of the parents we work with have had previous
    negative experiences with authority figures
    (police, school, bosses, etc.) and a history of
    oppression and discrimination. They have
    assumptions the minute we show up at their door
    that we are going to take their children and
    never give them back

31
Tone
  • Emphasize to the family that initiating
    Concurrent Planning activities does NOT mean that
    you are in any way giving up on the familys
    ability to reunify with their children. Help
    families so they do not feel hopeless
  • Remind parents that they are in control of making
    the changes required to reunify with their
    children and its your job to help that process
    as much as possible and that you will help

32
Suggestion
  • To help families understand why we would have
    two simultaneous plans, you can use an analogy
  • Wouldnt you want to know if you have heart
    disease? Heart disease is serious and you would
    want to plan for the worst and the best possible
    scenario or plan

33
In Sum
  • Concurrent Permanency Planning is an approach
    that emphasizes reunification and establishes an
    alternative permanency plan if a child cannot
    return home.
  • Concurrent, rather than sequential, permanency
    planning offers a model that is family-centered,
    child-focused and community-based to move
    children from the uncertainty of resource care to
    the security of a permanent family.

34
Questions?
  • For more information, guidance, or answers to
    policy questions, please contact
  • Case Management Policy Specialist, Sandra Lescoe
    602-364-0160
  • CWTI Supervisor,
  • Kylah Ross 602-771-3283

35
Acknowledgements
  • Policy
  • CHERYL RUSSELL D II
  • JACOB SCHMITT CO
  • JENNIFER BILLARD D III
  • KATHERINE GUFFEY CO
  • LINDA BEDNAREK FCRB
  • LINDA JOHNSON CO
  • LYNNE SNYDER D V
  • MYRIAM BARAJAS D I
  • NANCY LOGAN Former AAG
  • REGINA YAZZIE NAVAJO NATION
  • SUE SCHMELZ CO

36
Acknowledgements
  • Infrastructure
  • AVARAE JOHN
  • SALT RIVER PIMA
  • BETH ROSENBERG CAC
  • BILL CALLAGHAN FCRB
  • CAROLINE LOTT-OWENS AOC
  • CHERYL RUSSELL D II
  • DELIA ARNOLD D IV
  • JUDY SHEIRBON AAG
  • MICHELLE PARKER D I
  • NANETTE GERBER D I
  • ROB SHELLEY CIP
  • WARREN KOONTZ ITCA

37
Acknowledgements
  • Stakeholders
  • BEVERLEE KROLL CO
  • BONNIE MARCUS CASA
  • CAROLYN SMITH FCRB
  • JEANINE KENYON ATTORNEY
  • JIM YANG-HELEWELL CASEY
  • LEWIS LANE CO
  • NELSONJA BASTIAN SALT RIVER PIMA
  • REGINA YAZZIE NAVAJO NATION
  • SANDY GUIZZETTI FCRB
  • VICKI TORRES D VI

38
References
  • Children and Family Services. Practice guide
    for concurrent permanency planning. Minnesota
    Department of Human Services. St. Paul, MN.
    www.dhs.state.mn.us.
  • Katz, L., Spoonemore, N., Robinson, C. (1994).
    Concurrent Planning From Permanency Planning to
    Permanency Action, Lutheran Social Services of
    Washington and Idaho, Mountlake Terrace, WA
    98043.
  • Katz, L. (2001). Concurrent planning Benefits
    pitfalls. In Kathy Barbell Lois Wright
    (eds), Family foster care in the next century.
    Transaction Publishers.

39
REQUIREMENT
  • It is a requirement to show you have completed
    the training by doing this survey. The bottom
    half of the survey is optional feedback on the
    training. Thank you!
  • Please click on the link below to open and then
    complete the survey
  • http//www.zoomerang.com/Survey/?pWEB229DQHYN2PS

40
The End
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