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A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let

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A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let s Eat Well Every Day! Healthy Eating/ Nutrition In partnership with the Gold Sneakers Program of the Tennessee ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee: Let


1
A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee Lets
Eat Well Every Day!
  • Healthy Eating/
  • Nutrition

In partnership with the Gold Sneakers Program of
the Tennessee Department of Health
  • Revised 1/2012

2
  • Objectives
  • To understand the importance of healthy eating
    and nutrition in a childs overall health and
    well-being
  • To be able to implement learning activities with
    preschool children that emphasize healthy eating
    and good nutrition
  • To be able to share information learned with
    parents/caregivers through educational offerings,
    materials, and various means of communication
    (i.e., newsletters, websites, e-mails, letters).

3
Start with the Basics
  • United States Department of Agriculture Choose My
    Plate for Preschoolers
  • Produce for Better Health Foundations Fruits and
    Veggies More Matters
  • First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move
    Childcare Checklist
  • United States Department of Health and Human
    Services, Go, Slow, Whoa
  • .

4
Start with the Basics
  • Together, each of these resources provides
    guidance on healthy eating/nutrition for
    preschoolers and form the basis for the
    A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee Lets
    Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware Every Day program.

5
Choose My Plate
  • Choose MyPlate for Kids
  • Choose MyPlate for Preschoolers
  • www.choosemyplate.gov
  • Announced June 11, 2011, as a replacement for the
    United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
    Food Guide Pyramid and incorporates changes in
    categories of foods with more visuals to
    provide guidance on portion sizes.
  • Encourages everyone to fill half your plate with
    fruits and vegetables at each meal or eating
    occasion.
  • Customizable program for various ages.

6
Fruits and Veggies More Matters
  • The Five-a-Day campaign was initially implemented
    in 1991 with emphasis on eating at least five
    fruits and vegetables per day.
  • Fruits and Veggies More Matters in 2007
    replaces Five-a-Day, with a similar message.
  • Fruits and Veggies More Matters continues and
    carries the same message as Choose My
    Platechoosing to make fruits and vegetables half
    of ones meal intake.
  • The campaign supports the 2010 U.S. Dietary
    Guide-lines for Americans and the new Choose My
    Plate.

7
  • Visit www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org for
    downloadable resources.
  • Fill half of the plate with non-starchy
    vegetables such as broccoli, carrots, green
    beans, or tomatoes.
  • Fill the other half of the plate with grains such
    as pasta or a starch vegetable such as corn,
    peas, or potatoes AND chicken, fish, lean meat or
    any other protein source (see www.choosemyplate.go
    v for visual on portion sizes for each).
  • Dont forget dairy!

8
Lets Move Childcare ChecklistRecommendations
for Food Served to Toddlers and Preschoolers at
Childcare (Ages 15)
  • This is an initiative of First Lady, Michelle
    Obama, released June 2011.
  • The checklist also covers Beverages Served,
    Infant Feeding, Physical Activity, and Screen
    Time.
  • Checklist is based on the Nutrition and Physical
    Activity Self-Assessment for Childcare (NAP SACC)
    program.
  • Remember, guidance on portion sizes is available
    at www.choosemyplate.gov.

9
Recommendations for Food Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Recommendations are categorized as follows
  • Fruit and Vegetables Provisions
  • Meats and Fats Provisions
  • Feeding Environment
  • Provider Behaviors
  • Education
  • Policy
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

10
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Fruit and Vegetables Provisions
  • Offer a fruit or vegetable at every meal.
  • Fresh, frozen, or fruit canned in juice (not
    syrup) is offered most of the time.
  • A variety of vegetables are offered one or more
    times per day including dark green, orange, red,
    and deep yellow.
  • Cooked vegetables are rarely offeredwith added
    meat fat, margarine, or butter.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

11
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Meats and Fats Provisions
  • Fried or pre-fried potatoes (French fries, tater
    tots, hash browns) are never offered.
  • Fried or pre-fried (frozen and breaded) meats
    (chicken nuggets) or fish (fish sticks) are never
    offered.
  • Beans or lean meats (baked or broiled chicken,
    turkey, or fish) are offered one or more times
    per day.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

12
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Feeding environment provisions
  • Preschool meals are served family style (children
    are encouraged to serve themselves with limited
    help) all of the time.
  • There is a large variety of exposures and prompts
    with new opportunities introduced regularly to
    eat healthy foods (i.e., books, posters, fruit
    bowls, gardens).
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

13
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Provider Behaviors
  • Providers join children at the table for meals
    and talk informally about tryingand enjoying
    healthy food all the time.
  • In front of the children, providers consume the
    same food and drinks as children and avoid
    unhealthy foods (e.g., soda and fast food) all
    the time.
  • Providers teach children about healthy foods and
    the pleasure of eating using both formal (e.g.,
    circle time lessons) and informal (e.g., mealtime
    conversations) opportunities all the time.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

14
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Education
  • Training opportunities about nutrition (other
    than food safety and food program guidelines) are
    offered to providers two or more times per year.
  • Parents are offered nutrition education
    (workshops, activities, and/or take home
    materials) two or more times per year.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

15
Recommendations for Food Served to Toddlers and
Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Policy
  • There is a written policy on nutrition and food
    service that includes foods offered, the food
    environment, provider behaviors, and education
    that is followed and always shared with parents.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

16
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages 15)
  • Recommendations are categorized as follows
  • Water
  • Fruit Juice
  • Milk
  • Provider Behaviors
  • Education
  • Policy
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

17
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Water
  • Drinking water is available inside and outside,
    where it is visible and freely available for
    self-serve.
  • During indoor and outdoor play, providers prompt
    children to drink water all the time.
  • Water is offered to children over the age of one
    year, but not as a substitute for milk when it is
    a required food component one time per day or
    more.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

18
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Fruit Juice
  • 100 fruit juice is offered, no more than 46 oz.
    per day, and parents are encouraged to support
    this limit.
  • Sugary drinks (Kool-Aid, fruit drinks, sports
    drinks, sweet tea, and soda) are never offered.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

19
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Milk
  • Milk served to children ages two years and older
    is always 1 or skim/nonfat.
  • Flavored milk is never served to children.
  • Milk served to children 1-2 years should be
    whole milk, (Pediatric Nutrition Handbook, fourth
    edition, AAP, 1998).

20
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Provider Behaviors
  • Beverages offered to toddlers over one year are
    rarely or never offered in a bottle.

21
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Education
  • Training opportunities on juice and other
    beverage recommendations are offered to providers
    two or more times per year.
  • Parents are offered education on juice and other
    beverage recommendations (e.g., special programs,
    newsletters, information sheets) two or more
    times per year.

22
Recommendations for Beverages Served to
Toddlers and Preschoolers at Childcare (Ages
15)
  • Policy
  • Child care facility has a written policy on
    beverages that includes staff behaviors,
    education, and beverage use and is available,
    followed, and shared with parents and staff.
  • Lets Move Childcare Checklist,
    www.letsmove.gov, 2011.

23
United States Department of Health and Human
Services Go, Slow, and Whoa!
  • Activities in the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in
    Tennessee Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware
    Every Day use the Go, Slow, and Whoa concept.
  • GO foods are low in fats and sugar, while high in
    carbohydrates, protein, fiber, and other
    nutrients (e.g., fresh fruits, vegetables, whole
    grain breads, 1 milk, skinless chicken).

24
United States Department of Health and Human
Services Go, Slow, and Whoa!
  • SLOW foods have some health benefits, but are
    not as healthy as those in the GO group (e.g.,
    white bread, 2 milk, lean ground beef, fruits
    in light syrup, vegetables with added sauces).
  • WHOA foods are the least healthy foods and should
    be eaten once in a while (e.g., French fries,
    fruits in heavy syrup, bacon, full-fat cheese,
    donuts).

25
Putting Knowledge Into Action
26
So, now that you have the basics of good
nutrition and healthy eating, how can this be
incorporated in the classroom?
27
How to Get Started in Your Classroom and/or
Daycare/Preschool Facility
  • Use the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee
    Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware Every Day
    curriculum to select activities to implement in
    the classroom at least twice a week for 1015
    minutes per session.
  • Encourage children to continue with at-home
    activities provided in the kit.
  • Participate and encourage children and families
    to participate in the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in
    Tennessee Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware
    Every Day, center-wide Everyone, Every Day
    challenge activities and support the activities
    being done in your facility.

28
How to Get Started in Your Classroom and/or
Daycare/Preschool Facility
  • Share handouts and other materials with parents
    weekly using the calendar provided.
  • Consider seeking out assistance from local
    resources and using the optional evaluation
    components in the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in
    Tennessee kit to evaluate your activities so that
    you can gauge progress of your efforts.
  • Remember to use available resources
  • Choose My Plate for Preschoolers
  • Fruits and Veggies More Matters
  • Lets Move including the Childcare Checklist
  • Go, Slow, Whoa

29
A-B-C-1-2-3 HEALTHY KIDS IN TENNESSEE Lets
Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware Every Day
  • Materials include
  • Curriculum package which includes a menu of
    classroom activities that can be integrated into
    ongoing lesson plans and programming
  • A 12-week calendar of nutrition and healthy
    eating suggested programming in lieu of using the
    menu of choices
  • Instructions for nutrition intake assessment
    (optional activity) as an evaluation measure
  • Worksheets and take-home materials for children
    and their parents/caregivers
  • Organized A-B-C-1-2-3 Everyone, Every Day
    Center-Wide Challenges activities for families
  • Information ready to publish in newsletters,
    websites,and other communications

30
How to Get Started with the A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy
Kids in Tennessee Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be
Aware Every Day Program in Your Classroom and/or
Childcare/Preschool Facility
  • All staff should participate in A-B-C-1-2-3
    Healthy Kids in Tennessee trainingan in-person
    training session or online at www.abc123healthykid
    s.comand develop a plan for integrating the
    curriculum activities into your ongoing classroom
    lesson plans and programming.
  • Submit evaluation documents as proof of training
    to receive a certificate of completion from the
    A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee project
    director. This program has been recognized for
    training credits by the Tennessee Department of
    Human Services.
  • Make a commitment to using the curriculum in your
    facility and/or classrooms and to sharing
    materials with parents/caregivers weekly.
    Remember to ask questions and solicit feedback
    from children and their parents/caregivers.

31
Interesting Fact
  • Research indicates that children may need to be
    exposed to a food 1015 times before they will
    try it.
  • Never give up AND encourage parents and
    caregivers to never give up on their child
    becoming a healthier eater!
  • (Fruits and Veggies More Matters
    www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.gov, Sneaking
    Fruits and Veggies Into Your Childs Food,
    Retrieved August 14, 2011).

32
Want to Take it to the Next Level?
  • Want to take A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in
    Tennessee Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware
    Every Day to the next level?
  • Now that you have the tools to implement healthy
    living education in your classrooms and with
    parents and families, whats next?
  • Consider participating in the Gold Sneakers
    program, which helps you develop policy
    guidelines for your facility. Both programs
    complement each other extremely well, providing
    your facility with a well-rounded approach to
    good health!

33
Want to Take it to the Next Level? (continued)
  • To learn more about Gold Sneakers contact
  • Tennessee Department of Health,
  • Gold Sneaker Initiative
  • 615-532-7538

34
For more information or
questions, please contact Cynthia Chafin,
M.Ed., MCHES MTSU Adams Chair of Excellence in
Health Care Services/ Center for Health and Human
Services Tennessee Cancer Coalition
coordinator 615-898-5493 cindychafin_at_comcast.net
or cynthia.chafin_at_mtsu.edu www.abc123healthykids.
com The A-B-C-1-2-3 Healthy Kids in Tennessee
Lets Eat Well, Play, and Be Aware Every Day
project is supported in part by funding from the
MTSU Center for Physical Activity and Health in
Youth and the Tennessee Cancer Coalition, with
support of the MTSU Center for Health and Human
Services.
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