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MSS 905 Methods of Missiological Research

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MSS 905 Methods of Missiological Research Introduction to Missiological Research Types of Research Basic research: adding to our fundamental understanding and ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: MSS 905 Methods of Missiological Research


1
MSS 905 Methods of Missiological Research
  • Introduction to Missiological Research

2
Types of Research
  1. Basic research adding to our fundamental
    understanding and knowledge (regardless of
    practical or immediate implications)
  2. Applied research program evaluation, or
    action-oriented research
  3. Descriptive research describe groups,
    activities, situations or events normally using
    quantitative data analysis

3
Types of Research
  • Explanatory research
  • looking for causes and reasons
  • normally based on existing theories
  • ground-breaking normally using qualitative data
    analysis

4
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

5
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

6
1. Research Problem
  • Something that is happening and should NOT be
    happening
  • Something that is NOT happening and should be
  • Something that is happening but is not at the
    level it should be
  • Something is happening (or NOT happening) but it
    is not understood why or how
  • Something is done differently, and we dont know
    if its better or not
  • Its something like identifying a mystery that
    needs to be solved

7
Selecting a Topic for Research
  1. Personal experience (SA and racism,
    cross-cultural issues)
  2. Curiosity from a media story
  3. Looking at the state of knowledge in a field (Dr.
    Jim Harris)
  4. Solving a practical problem in society
    (Pentecostals perception of war and pacifism)
  5. Social premiums (hot opportunities)
  6. Personal values (Glossalalia and emotional
    maturity)
  7. Everyday life

8
Narrowing a Topic for Research
  • Examine the literature
  • Talk over ideas with others
  • Apply existing research to a specific context
  • Neuman (2006 p. 156, Box 6.4) Bad and Good
    Research Questions

9
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

10
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

11
2. Research Questions
  • Definition (Adler Clark, 2003) a question
    about one or more topics or concepts that can be
    answered through research
  • See
  • Adler Clark (2003) pp 67-96
  • Galvan (2006) chapter 3 on identifying data
    sources and tips on electronic searches
  • Vyymeister (2001) chapters 2 and 3 on finding
    sources and narrowing the scope of your topic

12
2. Research Questions
  • What are the variable that appear to be involved?
  • What appears to be driving, impeding, altering,
    deviating what is happening?
  • Which method works better?
  • At this stage simple conjecture and educated
    guesses are appropriate

13
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

14
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

15
3. Literature Review
  • Finding out everything there is to know about
    this problem in the literature
  • There may already be an answer
  • To uncover the variables, develop explanations
    and predictions about variables
  • To determine the level of knowledge that exists
    (low knowledge exploratory methods high
    descriptive/develop hypotheses)

16
3. Literature Review
Tip Check the references at the end of all the
articles!!!
Tip Use the Citation key word function
  • Stages
  • Consider from different angles develop search
    terms, key words, concepts, terms
  • Search the databases article titles, to
    abstracts, to articles
  • Begin categorization
  • Continue till you exhaust the field identified
    the variables, the theories, instruments,
    techniques used

17
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

18
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

19
Hypothesis Creation
  • Only after sufficient knowledge already exists in
    a field
  • Relationship between variables can be tested
  • Missiological examples
  • Do LACC schools produce better academics than
    nationals schools?
  • Are local evangelists better than foreign
    missionaries?
  • Will Facebook increase connectedness between
    missionaries and their sponsors?

20
Hypothesis Creation
  • Hypothesis is always first stated as a null
    hypothesis no relationship exists between
    these variables
  • Example (LACC schools)
  • H0 There is no relationship between academic
    scores of students from LACC and national schools
  • H1 Students from LACC schools achieve higher
    academic scores than students from national
    schools

21
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

22
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

23
Hypothesis Testing
  • After the data is collected from the variables
    they are analyzed to determine if there is a
    statistically significant difference (plt.05 .01
    .001)
  • If the difference is significant the null
    hypothesis is rejected and the alternate is
    considered

24
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

25
The Research Process
  1. Define a research problem
  2. Formulate research questions
  3. Undertake a literature review
  4. Building a hypothesis (or question)
  5. Determine the data needed
  6. Systematically collect data
  7. Present results and make recommendations

26
Project vs. Dissertation
  • D.Miss. Project
  • A professional program with an emphasis on
    practical theology, practical Christian wisdom
  • Addresses both the nature and the practice of
    missions
  • ATS requires research model to be informed by
    social sciences and some form of evaluation of
    results
  • A practice (the what?) based on some theory
    (the why?). Theory includes theological basis.

27
Project vs. Dissertation
  • D.Miss. Project Examples (from Vyhmeister)
  • Program development and evaluation (15)
  • Case study (16)
  • History or biography
  • See also Asbury dissertations

28
Project vs. Dissertation
Project Dissertation
Scope Limited Expanded
Length Maximum 150 pages 250 plus pages
Aim Solve a missions problem Enlarge the fund of missions knowledge
Audience Practitioners Academy and practitioners
Type of research Applied or possibly explanatory Basic, descriptive or explanatory
Statistical sophistication Normally descriptive in nature if at all Probably advanced (unless its basic research or theory development)
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