Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1, 2008 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1, 2008 PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 568b94-ZDMxO



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1, 2008

Description:

Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1, 2008 Goal Post Safety Goal Post Safety Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Report Centers for Disease Control March 11 ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:45
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 14
Provided by: msysaOrgd
Learn more at: http://www.msysa.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1, 2008


1
Maryland State Youth Soccer Association June 1,
2008
  • Goal Post Safety

2
Goal Post Safety
  • Mortality and Morbidity Weekly Report
  • Centers for Disease Control
  • March 11, 1994
  • Epidemiologic Notes and Reports Injuries
    Associated with Soccer Goalposts --- United
    States, 1979-1993
  • Analysis of 27 injuries and deaths associated
    with soccer goalposts.

3
Goal Post Safety Analysis of Data
  • CDC report submitted to Consumer Product Safety
    Commission (CPSC)
  • 18 of 27 cases were FATAL
  • 23 of 27 were MALE
  • Mean AGE of all cases 10 years old
  • Head Trauma principal cause of death

4
Goal Post Safety Analysis of Data Status of
Goalposts
  • 26 of 27 goalposts involved were METAL
  • 23 of 27 goalposts were PORTABLE
  • 25 of 27 cases where goalposts fell FORWARD
  • Crossbar striking the victim
  • 18 goalposts NOT ANCHORED
  • 1 goalpost POORLY ANCHORED
  • 3 goalposts ANCHORED PROPERLY
  • 5 goalposts status unknown

5
Goal Post Safety Analysis of Data Location
  • 15 cases occurred on a SCHOOL FIELD
  • 11 cases - LOCAL / PRIVATE FIELD
  • There are between 225,000 500,000 portable
    goalposts in the United States with 12 million
    players under the age of 18 playing soccer.

6
Goal Post Safety Analysis of Data Circumstances
  • 4 incidents occurred during a soccer GAME
  • 4 incidents occurred during PRACTICE
  • 19 incidents occurred during times NOT involving
    a GAME OR PRACTICE.

7
Goal Post Safety Analysis of Data Supervision
  • All 27 incidents were witnessed
  • 6 cases ADULT was directly supervising (visual
    contact)
  • 8 cases ADULT was in vicinity (not in visual
    contact)
  • 4 cases victim was climbing the goalpost
  • 7 cases victim was swinging / chin-ups on
    crossbar
  • 6 cases victim involved in lifting the goalpost
  • 4 cases goalpost fell forward due to WIND GUST
  • 20 mph wind gust can topple a goalpost that is
    unanchored

8
Goal Post Safety Safety Recommendations
  • 1990 CPSC (Voluntary labeling standard)
  • Warning labels on crossbar and posts
  • 1992 Manufacturers adopted standards to anchor
    the goalposts using stakes, etc..
  • 4 stakes are recommended (2 on rear, 2 on sides),
    counterbalances with sandbags, etc., etc., etc.,
  • Goalposts not used should be secured to permanent
    structure with goal-face down on ground or
    disassembled.

9
Goal Post Safety Recommendations
  • Design / Construction Guidelines
  • Design change to increase the depth of the goal
    with more weight farther away from the goal
    opening.
  • Lighter material for the posts and crossbar
  • Heavier rear framework and ability to fold when
    not in use.

10
Goal Post Safety Recommendations
  • Anchoring / Securing /Counterweighing
  • Auger Style anchor helical screwed into
    ground
  • Peg or Stake (varying lengths) driven into
    ground
  • J-Hook shaped stake hammered at an angle
  • Sandbags or counterweight artificial turf
  • All goals must be stored properly when not used.
  • Remove the net, place goal frames face to face,
    and secure to permanent fence or structure.

11
Soccer Goal Post Safety Are we getting the
message?
  • Risk Management Report by Lori Windolf Crispo,
    CPCU. Executive VP, Bollinger, Inc.
  • there has been no appreciable reduction in
    goal-related claims, despite the safety
    guidelines that have been put in place by soccer
    associations. 2002

12
Goal Post Safety What can be DONE?
  • Soccer State organizations, Clubs, Leagues, Parks
    and Recreation, Schools, Camps, Private soccer
    facilities should ATTACK this issue.
  • Written safety guidelines and standards
  • Educate coaches, league officers, referees,
    parents.
  • Empower coaches, officers, referees to enforce
    safety standards.
  • Communicate safety guidelines to ALL members of
    your soccer association and COMMUNITY.

13
THANK YOU !
About PowerShow.com