HISTORY OF WESTERN FOOTWEAR FASHION - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – HISTORY OF WESTERN FOOTWEAR FASHION PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 568044-Njk1M



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

HISTORY OF WESTERN FOOTWEAR FASHION

Description:

Title: HISTORY OF WESTERN FOOTWEAR FASHION Author: Zver Last modified by: Dawerty Created Date: 11/28/2007 6:27:53 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:111
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 27
Provided by: Zver4
Learn more at: http://festival.1september.ru
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: HISTORY OF WESTERN FOOTWEAR FASHION


1
(No Transcript)
2
(No Transcript)
3
From Egyptian tombs, dating as far
back as 5000 years, enough examples of footwear
have survived to give us a clear understanding of
the lifestyle of the ancient Egyptians and the
relevance of their footwear. The later Greek and
Roman cultures developed distinctly different
styles of footwear according to the gender and
social position of the wearer. Some of the names
for different styles of footwear which were part
of the classical vocabulary have come down to us
today, such as sandalium (sandal), solea (sole),
and soccus (sock). The centre of the
Roman empire moved east during the 4th and 5th
centuries to Byzantium. Under the Byzantines,
Christianity was used to reinforce the alliance
of what was once Rome's domain. The Christian
concept of clothing brought about radical change
from the classical ways. According to Christian
morality, it was considered sinful to expose the
body, so by the 8th century, shoes, designed to
cover the feet, replaced sandals.
CLICK HERE
4
(No Transcript)
5
From the 10th to 12th centuries, Europe emerged
from the Dark Ages by uniting into nations and
developing a mercantile capitalist economy.
Crusaders, sent to free the Holy Land from
Islamic occupation, brought back technical
knowledge and fineries, whetting the appetites of
nobles who craved more novelty. By the 14th
century, quality textiles and fine leathers were
being fashioned into shoes that became
conspicuous displays of style and elegance, worn
to express personal status. Fashion was born!
During the 14th century, a fashion for pointed
toes spread across Europe. The style seems to
have originated in Poland as it became known as
the poulaine (from "Poland") or the cracow (from
"Krakow"). Edicts were proclaimed limiting the
length of the toe according to the wealth and
social standing of the wearer.
6
When the pointed toe style fell from fashion at
the end of the 15th century, it was replaced in
Northern Europe by wide toe fashions, known
variously as the hornbill, cowmouth or bearpaw.
An unusual womans fashion, which was at the
height of popularity in Venice during the 16th
century, was the chopine a platform-soled mule
that raised the wearer sometimes as high as two
feet off the ground. By the time this fashion had
subsided in the early 17th century, heels had
emerged as a standard addition to both men's and
women's footwear.
7
(No Transcript)
8
As Europe gained power and wealth, the elite
distanced themselves from the masses through
conspicuous refinement and extravagant
ornamentation. A noble's status was visible in
everything he or she did and wore. Artifice ruled
the elites life. Flowery speech and mannered
gestures characterized courtly accomplishment.
Womens dress consisted of a bodice, a
petticoat and a gown. Costly lace collars were
popular and the bodice was sometimes
extravagantly décolleté. High-heeled footwear
made of expensive silks expressed the idle
lifestyles and accumulated wealth of the
"well-heeled."
9
(No Transcript)
10
18th century fashion was strongly influenced by
the French Court. During the second part of the
century the rigidity, dignity and seriousness of
the womens dresses gave way to more flowing
lines, decorated with bows and ruffles. Skirts
were distended sideways by means of an under
structure called a "panier" (basket). Shaped
high heels were worn by men and women of the
upper classes. Materials for shoes and dresses
were rich and splendid and included brocades,
embroidered silks and painted leathers. Large
showy buckles had become the feature of the
shoes. After the French Revolution in 1792,
shoe styles changed dramatically. Heels shrank
and even disappeared, suggesting everyone was
born on the same level. Expensive silks were
largely replaced by more affordable and
better-wearing leathers.
CLICK HERE
11
(No Transcript)
12
In the 19th century, fashion became available to
a much larger section of society. The stylish
elite had to keep up to date with the
ever-changing silhouette. By 1830, the square toe
had come into fashion and would remain stylish
for the next fifty years. During the 1850s boots
became modest essentials underneath the immense
wire-frame supported skirts, which tended to
swing when walking, exposing the ankle and foot.
Heels were slow to return to women's footwear,
but by the 1870s, were a standard addition.
13
The 19th century was an era of technological
improvements. Synthetic dyes were developed,
which gave new colours to the world of fashion,
and sewing machines eased the amount of handwork
required for sewing footwear and applying
decoration. While American predominance in
manufacturing developments made footwear cheaper,
the first of the great shoe designers, François
Pinet, began to create masterpieces of
workmanship and decoration.
CLICK HERE
14
(No Transcript)
15
By 1914 hemlines were rising and radical changes
in the roles for women were about to take place
due to the First World War. Following armistice,
the age of modernism descended as the leg came
into full view and the shoe, now preferred to the
boot, became the visible foundation of the
silhouette. Colour, pattern and detailing became
important design elements. High heels generally
reigned as they visually slimmed the foot and
ankle, and tightened the calf muscle for a
shapely lower leg. Since the 1910s, modern
transportation and communication has transformed
fashion into a world commodity. A huge variety of
footwear is available to us today. Whether for
sport or fashion, these highly designed foot
coverings express our individuality, but still
serve the purpose for which footwear was
originally invented -- to protect our feet.
CLICK HERE
16
CHECK YOURSELF ABOUT FOOTWEAR INTERESTING FACTS
1. In the early 19th century, long distance
walking became a popular pastime this was
calleda.  Walkabouts b. Footings c.
Pedestrianism 2. The slide fastener (zipper)
was invented as a waterproof closure for galoshes
ina. 1907 b. 1927 c. 1893 3. The most ever
paid for a pair of used shoes was fora.
Princess Diana's wedding shoes b. John
Travolta's shoes in "Saturday Night Fever" c.
Judy Garland's ruby slippers in "The Wizard of
Oz" 4. Which fictitious secret agent had a
telephone built into his shoea. James Bond b.
John Steed c. Maxwell Smart
17
5. Where are the boots worn by Neil Armstrong for
his famous first walk on the moon in 1969 where
he uttered the famous words "One small step for
man, one giant leap for mankind" ? a. The
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian
Institution,  Washington DC b. In Neil
Armstrong's personal possession c. In space 6.
Which shoe style did Pat Boone popularize in the
1950's a. saddle shoes b. penny loafers c.
white bucks 7. Approximately how many pairs of
shoes did Imelda Marcos, wife of deposed
Philippine president, have in her shoe rooma.
800 pairs b. 6000 pairs c. 1500 pairs
RIGHT ANSWERS
18
  • ????????? ??????????
  • http\\www. batashoemuseum.com
  • http//www.todayfashion.ru

19
  • ??????????? ???????
  • ??????? ???????? ??????????, ??????? ???????????
    ????? ??? ????2

20
(No Transcript)
21
(No Transcript)
22
(No Transcript)
23
(No Transcript)
24
(No Transcript)
25
(No Transcript)
26
  • RIGHT ANSWERS
  • Long distance walking was called Pedestrianism.
    Famous avid walkers of this period include Sir
    Walter Scott, Henry David Thoreau, Samuel Taylor
    Coleridge, Thomas Carlyle, Robert Louis Stevenson
    and Jean Jacques Rousseau, all of whom claimed
    that walking great distances was good for the
    health.
  • The right answer is 1893, a full thirty-five
    years before they were commonly adapted for
    clothing closures
  • The right answer is Judy Garland's ruby slippers
    in "The Wizard of Oz" Of the 8 pairs of ruby
    slippers made for Judy Garland in "The Wizard of
    Oz, the last pair at auction sold for US 666,000
    on June 2 2000.
  • The right answer is Maxwell Smart.
  • Floating in space - they were jettisoned before
    returing to eath in case of contamination.
  • The right answer is White Bucks.
  • The right answer is 1500 pairs!
About PowerShow.com