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West Virginia Enhanced HSTW Design Site Development Workshop: Developing a School Improvement Plan

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Title: West Virginia Enhanced HSTW Design Site Development Workshop: Developing a School Improvement Plan


1
West Virginia Enhanced HSTW DesignSite
Development Workshop Developing a School
Improvement Plan
HSTW
2
Site Development Workshop Objectives
HSTW
  • Understanding of HSTW enhanced design.
  • Current status of school and classroom practices.
  • Develop actions for closing the knowing and doing
    gap.
  • Connect HSTW and 21st century learning

3
Actions for Closing the Knowing and Doing Gap
  • Why Before How
  • Knowing comes from doing
  • Actions count more than plans
  • There is no doing without mistakes
  • Measure what matters
  • What leaders do matters

4
Workshop Format
HSTW
  • Introduce Key Practices
  • Why?
  • Discuss key indicators
  • Determine status of school practices
  • Actions taken by successful schools
  • Agree on actions to implement
  • Work as a leadership team

5
Work Harder to Get Smarter We need to change
our thinking and our language from an ability
model to an effort model.
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
6
Enhanced HSTW Goals
HSTW
  • 85 percent of high school students meet HSTW
    reading, mathematics and science performance
    goals
  • Increase the percentages of students at the
    proficient level to at least 50 percent in
    reading, mathematics and science as measured by
    the HSTW assessment and the West Virginia state
    assessment.
  • 85 percent of high school graduates complete
    college preparatory courses in mathematics,
    science, English/language arts and social studies
    and a concentration.

7
Enhanced HSTW Goals Continued
HSTW
  • Improve middle grades to high school transition.
  • Increase to 90 percent of students who enter
    grade nine and complete high school four years
    later.
  • All students leave high school with postsecondary
    credit or having met standards to avoid remedial
    courses.

8
Enhanced HSTW Key Practices
HSTW
  • Culture of Continuous Improvement
  • Program of Study
  • Career/Technical Studies
  • Structured Experiential Learning
  • High Expectations
  • Academic Studies
  • Students Actively Engaged
  • Teachers Working Together
  • Guidance
  • Extra Help

9
Linking HSTW and 21st Century Learning
  • Key items taken from the HSTW assessment student
    survey related to applied skills
  • Pages 6-7 of Planner

10
Framework for 21st Century Learning
  • Core Subjects
  • 21st Century Content
  • Learning and Thinking Skills
  • Information and Communications Technology (ICT)
    Literacy
  • Life Skills
  • 21st Century Assessments

11
Instruction and Learning Appraisal (ILA) Report
Summary/HSTW
APPRAISAL AREA LOW IMP LOW IMP MODERATE IMP MODERATE IMP FULL IMP FULL IMP TOTAL ILA SITES
WV HSTW WV HSTW WV HSTW
Shared Goals for Learning 44 36 44 38 13 27 16
Shared Leadership 50 61 50 25 0 14 16
Learning Culture 56 51 44 28 0 21 16
High Expectations (HSTW) 52 38 10
Importance of High School (HSTW) 25 41 34
Effective Teaching 94 30 6 44 0 26 16
Aligned Curriculum 80 34 20 60 0 6 15
Purposeful Student Assessment 94 62 6 29 0 10 16
12
Instruction and Learning Appraisal (ILA) Report
SummaryContinued
APPRAISAL AREA LOW IMP LOW IMP MODERATE IMP MODERATE IMP FULL IMP FULL IMP Total ILA Sites
WV HSTW WV HSTW WV HSTW
School-Family-Comm. Connections 25 30 56 38 19 32 16
Timely Guidance/HSTW 6 40 54
Math 69 31 31 49 0 20 16
Science 50 37 50 47 0 16 16
Literacy Across the Curriculum 73 50 27 37 0 14 15
Special Education 73 27 15
English Lang. Learners 50 50 2
13
Applied Skills
  • Basic skills high school graduates should possess
    as ranked as very important by employers
  • Professionalism / Work Ethic (80)
  • Teamwork / Collaboration (74)
  • Oral Communications (70)
  • Ethics / Social Responsibility (63)
  • Critical Thinking / Problem Solving (58)
  • Information Technology Application (53)

14
Applied Skills
  • Basic skills high school graduates should possess
    as ranked as very important by employers, cont.
  • Written Communication (53)
  • Diversity (52)
  • Lifelong Learning / Self Direction (43)
  • Creativity / Innovation (36)
  • Leadership (29)

15
Emphasis on Applied Skills
Students have worked with one or more students in their class on a challenging science assignment at least monthly. 64
Students analyzed works of literature in class at least monthly. 57
Students often tried to do their best work in school. 55
Students have drafted, rewritten and edited writing assignments before they were given a grade at least monthly. 52
Students stood before the class and made an oral presentation on a project or assignment to meet specific requirements of quality at least monthly. 37
16
Emphasis on Applied Skills
Students have often been part of a team or small group in class. 41
Students have often revised their essays or other written work several times to improve their quality. 36
Students have orally defended a process they used to solve a mathematics problem at least monthly. 29
Students often had to develop and analyze tables, charts and graphs in their school work. 28
17
EnhancedHSTW Key Conditions
HSTW
  • A clear, functional mission statement
  • Strong leadership
  • Plan for continuous improvement
  • Qualified teachers
  • Commitment to goals
  • Flexible scheduling
  • Support for professional development

18
West Virginia and The Partnership for 21st
Century Skills
  • Emphasizes
  • information and communications technology
    literacy,
  • critical thinking,
  • communication skills,
  • global awareness, and
  • business, economic and civic literacy.

19
Why Have Leadership Teams?
HSTW
  • Teachers spend more time talking about their work
  • Leadership teams sustain efforts when a leader
    leaves
  • Communication improves
  • Teams come up with better ideas
  • Work and responsibility are shared
  • A facilitator
  • A recorder
  • A timekeeper
  • A scribe
  • A presenter

20
2006 HSTW Assessment
  • NAEP-referenced subject tests
  • Reading, Mathematics, Science
  • Scale 0-500
  • Student Survey
  • Course History
  • School and Classroom Experiences
  • Teacher Survey

21
West Virginia (2006) 21st Century HSTW Pilot
Sites Participation
  • 2006 HSTW Assessment
  • 16 schools
  • 1,148 students
  • 800 teachers

22
Most-improved and Non-improved Schools
HSTW
  • Comparison of two sets of 100 schools using 2004
    and 2006 data
  • Similar ethnicity
  • Similar sizes
  • Similar locations Urban, Suburban, Rural
  • Similar parent education
  • Different progress in implementation and
    achievement

23
Implementation Differences Result in Achievement
Differences
Non-improved Schools Most-improved Schools
Reading 11 15
Mathematics 8 12
Science 12 16
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
24
Achievement Reading Differences across Sub-groups
Reading Non-improved Most-improved
All students 11 15
African-American 12 16
White 10 13
Low parent education 11 14
High parent education 11 14
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
25
Average Gains/Declines in Mathematics Achievement
Scores
Mathematics Non-improved Most- improved
All Students - 8 12
African-American - 9 13
White - 6 11
Low parent education - 7 11
High parent education - 8 12
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
26
Average Gains/Declines in Science Achievement
Scores
Science Non-improved Most- improved
All Students - 10 16
African-American - 12 19
White - 10 18
Low parent education - 11 17
High parent education - 12 16
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
27
Key Question
HSTW
  • Why do students at most-improved schools make
    greater gains in achievement than students at
    non-improved schools?

28
Key PracticeContinuous Improvement Use
student assessment and program evaluation data to
continuously improve school culture,
organization, management, curriculum and
instruction to advance student learning.
HSTW
29
School Leaders Need to
  • Use formative assessments and benchmarks to
    assess student learning
  • Monitor instructional practice for the use of
    research-based strategies
  • Conduct surveys of students, teachers, and
    parents and analyze responses to determine the
    impact of school structure and practices

30
Why is using data for continuous improvement
important?
HSTW
  • Know where you are-where you need to be
  • Inspire change
  • Measure progress
  • Link achievement with changes in classroom
    practices
  • Celebrate accomplishments

31
Foundation for Continuous Improvement
HSTW
  • Establish a consensus about the need to change
    (assess)
  • Set interim targets to close the gap between
    current and desired practices (plan)
  • Engage and support faculty to reach the targets
    (do)
  • Assess progress in terms of targeted goals
    (evaluate)
  • Celebrate successes frequently
  • Repeat the cycle

32
Climate for Continuous Improvement
Teachers Say WV Pilot Sites Top 50 Sites
Goals are clear 44 80
Teachers maintain a demanding and supportive environment 31 71
Principals stress the need to teach all students to same high standards (monthly) 40 60
Teachers continue to learn and seek out new ideas 33 74
Teachers/administrators work as a team 39 78
Teachers use data to evaluate school and classroom practices 27 51
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment
33
Take five minutes to complete the climate for
continuous improvement checklist as a team.
Page 12 of Planner
34
How are performance and practices measured?
HSTW
  • Students Completing HSTW Recommended Curriculum
  • State Assessments
  • WV - Appalachia Regional Comprehensive Center at
    Edvantia Instruction and Learning Appraisal
    Reports
  • CT End-of-Course Exams
  • Students Meeting HSTW Performance Goals
  • ACT/SAT Results

35
How Schools Measure the Depth of HSTW
Implementation
HSTW
  • The HSTW Assessment
  • NAEP referenced assessment in Reading,
  • Mathematics and Science
  • Student survey of school and classroom
  • practices
  • Student transcript analysis
  • Faculty Survey
  • Annual Report
  • Technical Assistance Visit
  • Assessing Practice

36
Organizing Teams for Continuous Planning and
Implementation
  • Five Focus Teams (included in overall school
    improvement team)
  • Curriculum leadership team
  • Professional development leadership team
  • Guidance and public information leadership team
  • Transitions leadership team
  • Evaluation leadership team
  • See Page 14 in the Planner

37
Continuous Improvement Specific ActionsPage
13-14
  • Describe how you will organize an overall school
    improvement team and five focus teams
  • How will you select a team leader?
  • How will you select team members and what content
    areas will be represented on each team?
  • How will you establish expectations for each
    team?
  • Which teams will analyze gaps in
  • Enrollment in advanced academics
  • Classroom expectations
  • Readiness for grade 9
  • Readiness for postsecondary and careers
  • Alignment of teacher assignments, student work,
    and classroom assessments to college and career
    readiness standards

38
Key PracticeProgram of Study
HSTW
Require each student to complete an upgraded
academic core and a concentration.
39
Completing a Challenging Program of Study Matters
HSTW
  • A Challenging Program of Study
  • Is the best predictor of achievement
  • Gives focus
  • Prepares students for the next step
  • Makes high school count

40
HSTW Recommended Academic Core for All Students
HSTW
  • Four credits in college-prep/honors English
  • Students read 8-10 books a year, write short
    papers weekly, and complete at least one major
    research paper
  • Four mathematics credits Algebra I, geometry,
    and two other math courses (at least 85 complete
    Algebra II and above)
  • Students completing algebra I in grade 8 complete
    four additional math courses
  • Students take math the senior year
  • Three college-prep science credits
  • Biology, chemistry, physics or applied physics,
    or anatomy/physiology
  • Four college-prep social studies
  • Including 21st Century civics, economics and
    global awareness

41
Recommended Concentrations
HSTW
  • Mathematics and science concentration four
    college prep credits in each field, with at least
    one at the AP level
  • Humanities concentration four or more credits
    in college-prep/Honors English, social studies,
    foreign language, fine arts or literature with at
    least one credit at the AP or college level
  • Career/technical concentration four or more
    credits in an approved CT field

42
HSTW
  • Take 5 minutes to complete the pre-learning
    concept check on a Rigorous Curriculum.
  • Take 3 minutes to discuss answers in table
    groups.
  • Pages 15

43
Recommended Core andHigher Achievement
15 54
31
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
44
Changes in Percentages of Students Completing
Recommended Academic Curriculum
Source 2004 and 2006 High School Assessment
45
Changes in Percentages of Majority Students
Completing Recommended Academic Curriculum
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
46
Changes in Percentages of African-American
Students Completing Recommended Academic
Curriculum
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
47
Changes in Percentages of Students Having Parents
with High Levels of Education Completing
Recommended Curriculum
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
48
Changes in Percentages of Students Having Parents
with Low Levels of Education Completing
Recommended Academic Curriculum
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
49
Reflection Question
  • What actions did adults take to increase the
    percentages of all groups of students taking the
    right courses?

50
Strategies for Implementing the HSTW Core
Curriculum
HSTW
  • Enroll ALL students in the Core
  • Enroll 15-20 percent more students in higher
    level courses
  • Adopt alternative schedules to allow time for
    students to take critical courses
  • Use the core as the default curriculum
  • Get guidance staff on board

51
Actions to Get Students to Take the Right Courses
HSTW
  • Raise graduation requirements
  • Strengthen guidance and advisement - involve
    parents
  • Develop student handbook with career pathways and
    related course of study
  • Eliminate smorgasbord scheduling
  • Use guest speakers, hold career expos and college
    fairs
  • Establish small learning communities

52
  • Students behavior and attitude toward school
    changes when school leaders agree to do whatever
    it takes to get students to grade-level
    standards, prepared for challenging high school
    studies and for postsecondary studies and
    careers.
  • Achievement goes up, graduation rates increase
    and students become more engaged when leaders
    lead to set higher expectations and support
    students to meet them.

53
Major Actions to Enroll More Students in
HSTW-recommended Core and Concentration
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to the key
    practice and determine one outstanding practice
    in place
  • Identify major actions to increase annually by
    10 - 20 students completing
  • Four college preparatory English courses
    (students read 8-10 books a year, write weekly
    and complete at least one research paper)
  • Four courses in mathematics Algebra I and
    higher
  • Three college preparatory, lab-based science
    courses
  • Four college preparatory social studies courses
  • A concentration academic and/or
    career/technical
  • Page 16-17

54
HSTW
Key PracticeCareer/Technical Studies
  • Provide more students access to intellectually
    challenging career/technical studies in
    high-skill/high-demand fields that emphasize
    higher-level mathematics, science, literacy and
    problem-solving skills needed in the workplace
    and in further education.
  • School leaders need to
  • Develop standards for awarding postsecondary
    credit.
  • Require senior projects.
  • Have students work toward a recognized employer
    certification.

55
How does your school rate?
  • Take a few minutes to check the column that best
    fits the concepts and instructional practices
    that provide the foundation for your students.
  • Pages 18 and 19 of planner

56
Quality Career/Technical Courses Matter
HSTW
  • Improve high school retention
  • Increase understanding of academic content
  • Give meaning to school
  • Motivate students
  • Improve retention of academic skills
  • Get on track faster after graduation
  • Discover career options

57
Purpose of High School Career/technical Studies
HSTW
  • Prepare students for work and further study
  • Advance technical literacy
  • Understand technical concepts
  • Read and comprehend technical materials
  • Advance technical numeracy
  • Apply mathematics problems within chosen field
  • Solve problems and think critically

58
Organizing High School Career/technical Programs
around 16 Career Clusters
  • Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • Construction
  • Manufacturing
  • Transportation, Distribution and Logistics
    Services
  • Business and Administrative Services
  • Wholesale/retail Sales and Services
  • Financial Services
  • Hospitality and Tourism

Source U.S. Department of Education.
59
Organizing High School Career/technical Programs
around 16 Career Clusters (contd)
  • Health Services
  • Arts, Audio, Video Technology and Communication
    Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Scientific Research, Engineering and Technical
    Services
  • Human Services
  • Legal and Protective Services
  • Education and Training Services
  • Public Administration/Government Services
  • (www.careerclusters.org)

Source U.S. Department of Education.
60
Different Ways to Organize High School
Career/technical Studies
  • Using a career major/academies
  • Organizing into small learning communities around
    career themes
  • Organizing around broad career pathways
  • Planning programs of academic and
    career/technical studies that are linked to
    postsecondary studies
  • Having partnership with technology
    center/employer/postsecondary institution

61
Strengthening C/T Studies
HSTW
  • Enroll at-risk students in at least one C/T
    credit course annually
  • Offer ninth grade exploratory course
  • Increase the number of students completing 4 or
    more technical courses
  • Expand opportunities to earn post-secondary
    credit or certifications while in high school

62
WV Students at Enhanced Sites
CTE Students said they had to 2006 Sites Goal
Use mathematics to complete challenging assignments in their CTE area at least weekly 24 75
Read and interpret technical books and manuals to complete assignments at least weekly 27 80
Read a career-related article and demonstrate understanding of the content at least monthly 47 85
Complete short writing assignments of one to three pages and receiving a a grade in their career/technical classes at least weekly 6 65
Source WV Enhanced Sites, 2006 HSTW Assessment
63
Quality Career/Technical Studies and Higher
Achievement
28
45 27
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
64
2004 Graduates Say Their High School Should Have
Graduates said their school should have placed a greater emphasis on the following Agree Strongly or Somewhat
Provided information and counseling about continuing my education and careers 76
Placed more emphasis on oral communication skills. 70
Placed more emphasis on mathematics. 63
Assisted me in meeting high academic standards 60
Placed more emphasis on career/technical programs 61
Expected me to read in all my classes 59
Required me to take more courses at a high level 54
65
Key PracticeStructured Experiential
LearningEngage students in quality work-based,
service-based, community-based, and/or
research-based learning experiences.
HSTW
66
What improves the quality of experiential
learning?
HSTW
  • Each student has
  • Classroom and work-site assignments that are
    correlated to career field
  • Work-site experiences connected to career goals
  • A work-site mentor

67
Quality Experiential Learning andHigher
Achievement
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
68
Structured Experiential Learning Opportunities
HSTW
  • Job Shadowing
  • Service Learning
  • Co-op
  • Internships
  • Youth Apprenticeship

69
Quality Experiential Learning Experiences Set
High Expectations for Students
HSTW
  • They require students to
  • Attend a regular class and/or seminar
  • Plan experiences with work-site employer and
    teacher
  • Keep a journal of experiences
  • Develop a career portfolio

70
Assess Current Status CTE and Student
Experiential Learning
  • Assess your current CTE and Student Experiential
    Learning Status
  • Pages 20-21 of planner

71
Designing Authentic Integrated Project Units
Eight Steps
  1. Identify the embedded mathematics, science and
    technical content taught
  2. Identifying the literacy study skills and habits
    of success
  3. Assess students current knowledge and skills
  4. Develop engaging, high-level activities

Page 22-23 in Planner
72
Designing Authentic Integrated Project Units
Eight Steps
  1. Develop related math and science activities
  2. Prepare traditional math and science activities
  3. Describing how students will demonstrate their
    understanding of mathematics, science and
    technical knowledge and skills
  4. Develop a summative assessment

Page 22-23 in Planner
73
Read Pages 22-23 in Planner
TOPICTitle of Reading
Main Ideas
Details
GIST/Summary How you see this being implemented
in your school
74
Major Actions to Implement Integrated Projects
  • Page 23 in Planner Identify integrated projects
    in your school that already follow these steps or
    that would be easy to adapt
  • Page 24 in Planner Identify one outstanding
    Practice in CTE and/or Structured Experiential
    Learning
  • Identify a major action for developing a major
    project each 12 weeks of school with embedded
    mathematics, science, and technology skills

75
Reading Homework Day 1
  1. Project-based Learning Guide 11
  2. Literacy Guide 12
  3. Where Do You Begin? Guide 1 (Principal)
  4. HSTW An Enhanced Design (Principal)
  5. Developing Effective Teams Guide 2 (HSTW
    Coordinator)

76
Reading Homework Day 1
  1. Students Will Take the Right Courses When the
    Principal Leads Guide 14 (Counselor)
  2. Students Cant Wait (Department Chair)
  3. Extra Help Guide 6
  4. Business Education Guide 7 (CTE Leader/Chair)
  5. Ten Strategies for Creating a Classroom Culture
    of High Expectations Guide 13

77
Key PracticeHigh Expectations Motivate more
students to meet high expectations by integrating
high expectations into classroom practices and
giving students frequent feedback. When he
wrote, Blessed is he who expects nothing, for he
shall never be disappointed, Alexander Pope
could have been describing the expectations that
some teachers at non-improved schools have for
their students nothing.
HSTW
78
Literacy Strategy
HSTW
  • Four Corners
  • Allowing students to redo work until it meets
    standards and giving them credit is a form of
    cheating and unfair to students who do it right
    the first time.

79
Why Raise Expectations?
HSTW
  • Communicate that high school counts
  • Give students a sense of self-worth
  • Help students see that the school believes in
    them
  • Help students be more focused, motivated and
    goal-oriented
  • Prepare students for the next level

80
High Expectation Practices andHigher Achievement
High Expectations Indicators WV Pilot Sites Most-Improved Sites
Students report that their teachers often clearly indicated the amount and quality of work that are necessary to earn a grade of "A" or "B at the beginning of a project or unit. 38 50
Students report that their teachers were frequently available before during or after school to help them with their studies. 43 59
Students report that they usually spend one or more hours on homework each day. 15 24
Students report that they often revise their essays or other written work several times to improve their quality. 27 38
Students report that they have worked hard to meet high standards on assignments often. 41 46
Source 2006 HSTW Assessment and Student Survey
81
High Expectations andHigher Achievement
10 38
52
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
82
WV Pilot Sites Emphasis on High Expectations
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
83
  • Why do you think some students are in classrooms
    with high expectations while others are not?

84
Key Indicators That A School Has High
Expectations
HSTW
  • More students perceive that
  • Courses are exciting and challenging
  • They often try to do their best work
  • They seldom or never fail to complete assignments
  • Teachers often encourage them to do well in school

85
HSTW
Key Indicators That A School Has High
Expectations
  • More students perceive that
  • Teachers often showed they care by not letting
    them get by without doing the work.
  • It is very important to study hard to get good
    grades.
  • It is very important to participate actively in
    and attend all classes.
  • It is very important to take a lot of
    college-preparatory classes.

86
Different Strategies for Agreeing on A-, B- and
C-level Work
  • Use basic, proficient and advanced
  • NAEP National Readiness Standards
  • Use select universities, regional universities,
    community college and high school graduation
  • Use procedural/comprehension, application/analysis
    , and analysis/synthesis
  • Intellectual (Webb/Bloom)

87
College Readiness
  • SAT scores
  • 500 or higher ready for college level work
  • Below 450 remediation
  • Select universities (1100 score for acceptance)
  • ACT College-readiness Benchmarks
  • English 18
  • Reading 21
  • Mathematics 22
  • Science 24

88
College and Career ReadinessPercent of WV
Seniors Meeting ACT College-readiness Benchmarks
(2006)
Source ACT, Inc. 2006
89
Actions for Defining the Amount and Quality of
Work Expected
HSTW
  • Benchmark assignments and assessment to
    proficient level/grade level
  • Develop common course syllabi, rubrics and
    end-of-course exams
  • A Above grade level work
  • B Grade level work
  • C Approaching grade level work
  • The Power of I
  • -- Do Assignment --

90
Actions for Revising Work
  • Three-week assessment
  • Requiring extra help for those not meeting
    standards
  • Teachers do not let students get by without doing
    work

91
Actions to Make Homework of Value
HSTW
  • Multiple formats for homework include short-term
    practice and long-term high level projects
  • Study groups established so students can get
    support
  • Homework crosses multiple curricular areas and
    students receive credit in each area
  • Teachers communicate that homework is important
  • School establishes and communicates a clear
    homework policy

92
Team Planning Time
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to raise
    expectations and determine one outstanding
    practice in place.
  • Determine one major action your school can take
    to establish common expectations for A work, B
    work, and Introduce the Power of I in the highest
    failed courses in grade 9 and 10.
  • Determine one major action your school can take
    to get students to redo work until it meets
    standards.
  • Determine one additional major action for grade
    and credit recovery.
  • Note Actions should be measurable.
  • See Pages 25-26 of Planner

93
Key PracticeStudents Actively Engaged
HSTW
  • Engage all students in academic and
    career/technical classrooms in rigorous and
    challenging proficient-level assignments using
    research-based instructional strategies and
    technology.

94
School Leaders Can Support
HSTW
  • All teachers in engaging students in reading,
    writing, making presentations, using technology,
    and applying high-level problem-solving and
    thinking skills.
  • Mathematics, science and career/technical
    teachers working together to better align and
    integrate concepts and skills into assignments
    and assessments.

95
SREBs Literacy Goals
HSTW
  • Students will
  • read the equivalent of 25 books per year across
    the curriculum
  • write weekly in all classes
  • use reading and writing strategies to enhance
    their learning in all classes
  • write research papers in all classes
  • be taught as if they were in honors language arts
    classes

96
HSTW
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
  • Admit slips
  • Exit slips
  • Double entry or two column notes
  • ReQuest
  • Interactive CLOZE
  • Cubing
  • Open-response questions A KEY

97
HSTW
Fifteen Literacy Strategies Any Teacher Can and
Should Use
8. KWL charts 9. Metaphorical Thinking 10. Jigsaw
reading 11. Paired Reading 12. Graphic
organizers 13. GIST 14. WordSplash/Capsule
Vocabulary 15. RAFT
98
Key Indicators for Literacy
HSTW
  • Students
  • Often used word-processing software to complete
    an assignment or project
  • Often revised their essays or other written work
    several times to improve their quality
  • Sometimes or often were asked to write in-depth
    explanations about a class project or activity
  • Discussed or debated with other students each
    about what they read in English or language arts
    classes at least each month
  • Read and interpreted technical books or manuals
    at least weekly to complete assignments in CTE
    areas (CTE Students only)

99
What do you think the 100 most improved schools
did to engage more students in literacy across
the curriculum?
Indicator WV Sites Most-Imp Sites
They used word-processing software to complete an assignment or project often. 2 9
They revised their essays or other written work several times to improve their quality often. 0 6
They were asked to write in-depth explanations about a class project or activity sometimes or often. - 4 13
They read and interpreted technical books and manuals at least monthly to complete assignments in their career/technical area (CTE students only). 1 7
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
100
What do you think the 100 most improved schools
did to engage more students in literacy across
the curriculum?
Indicator WV Sites Most-Imp Sites
They read an assigned book outside of English class and demonstrated that they understood the significance of the main ideas at least monthly. - 1 6
They completed short writing assignments of one to three pages for which they received a grade in their English classes at least monthly. 5 7
They completed short writing assignments of one to three pages for which they received a grade in their science classes at least monthly. - 4 3
They completed short writing assignments of one to three pages for which they received a grade in their social studies classes at least monthly. 3 6
101
Literacy Experiences Across the Curriculum and
Higher Reading Achievement
13 37
51
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
102
Table Teams
  • Review your current status related to Literacy
    and determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • Determine one action for year 1, year 2 and year
    3 the school can take to get students to read 25
    books a year, write weekly in all classes, use
    reading and writing strategies to learn content
    in all classes and write at least one research
    paper in each class.
  • Page 27-29

103
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Mathematics Instruction
Students said they WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Took a math class their senior year - 3 6
Took at least four full-year courses in math in grades 9 through12 1 7
Their math teachers showed them how math concepts are used to solve real-life problems sometimes or often 4 5
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
104
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Mathematics Instruction
Students said they WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Completed a math project in ways that most people would use math in a work setting at least monthly 0 1
Solved math problems other that those found in textbook at least monthly 2 3
Used math to complete challenging assignments in their career/technical area at least monthly 8 1
105
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Mathematics Instruction
Students said they WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Used a graphing calculator to complete math assignments at least monthly 5 11
Orally defended a process they used to solve a math problems at least monthly 0 2
Solved math problems with more than one-answers at least monthly - 1 4
106
Numeracy Experiences Across the Curriculum and
Higher Mathematics Achievement
19 50
31
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
107
Standards Based Units that Address Numeracy
Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Teachers create units of study aligned to
    standards in all classes
  • Unit plans should include the following
  • Standard or standards addressed
  • Level of intellectual demandmove beyond recall
    procedural skills to analysis and application
  • Major assignments to be given
  • Outline the major study skills addressed
    literacy skills and the research-based
    instructional strategies

108
Standards Based Units that Address Numeracy
Across the Curriculum
HSTW
  • Increase student use of math skills in all
    content areaswith special emphasis in science,
    CT courses, physical education, athletics
  • For example
  • Students orally defend a process they used to
    solve a math problem
  • Students work in groups to solve math problems

109
Table Teams
  • Review your current status related to numeracy
    and determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • Determine one action for year 1, year 2 and year
    3 the school can take to get
  • All seniors enrolled in math
  • Teachers to use more real-world problems,
    technology and cooperative learning
  • Teachers to create units of study based upon
    college and career readiness standards
  • Integrate math into career/technical and science
    classes
  • See pages 28 and 29

110
Significantly More Students in 2004 than in 2002
Experienced High-quality Science Instruction
Students said they WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Used science equipment to do science activity in the classroom at least monthly 7 7
Prepared a written report of lab results for laboratory investigations at least monthly 11 13
Worked with one or more students in class on a science assignment at least monthly 6 9
111
Table Teams
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to science
    instruction and determine one outstanding
    practice in place
  • Determine one action for Year 1, Year 2 and Year
    3 the school can take to get students to
  • Take at least 3 CP Science courses (4 in a block)
  • Conduct frequent labs in science classes and
    write about what they learn
  • Read science-related articles science
  • Design and conduct scientific investigations in
    all classes
  • Analyze and defend findings from investigations
  • See pages 28 and 29

112
Developing 21st Century Skills
  • 21st Century technology tools
  • Information and communication technologies
    (computers, networking, MP3 players, interactive
    white boards, probes/sensors, etc.
  • Audio, video, multimedia and other digital tools
  • Access to online learning communities and
    resources
  • Aligned digital content software and adequate
    hardware for all students

113
Emphasis on Applied Skills
25
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
114
Emphasis on Applied Skills
46
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
115
Emphasis on Applied Skills
29
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
116
Emphasis on Applied Skills
25 46 29
Source WV Pilot Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment and
Student Survey
117
Developing 21st Century Skills
  • Circle promising practices you have in place to
    help students develop these skills?
  • Place a checkmark by the greatest areas of
    weakness?
  • Planner, page 6

118
Table Teams
HSTW
  • List three actions can the school take to have
    teachers integrate 21st Century Learning Skills
    into the existing curriculum.
  • Pages 29 in planner
  • Appendix B, pages 41-55 of planner

119
Key PracticeGuidance Involve students and
their parents in a guidance and advisement system
that develops positive relationships and ensures
completion of an accelerated program of study
with an academic or career/technical
concentration.
HSTW
120
A Supportive Guidance System Matters
HSTW
  • Clear goals
  • Focused program of study
  • Students have someone who cares
  • Students believe in themselves
  • Students get needed services

121
A Teacher Advisement System is Key
  • A counselor oversees the program
  • An Advisor who remains with their students
    throughout high school
  • Staff development for Advisors
  • A written curriculum
  • A portfolio for each student
  • Regular meetings (at least monthly) with planned
    lessons
  • Necessary adjustments based on annual assessment

122
A Good Guidance and Advisement Program Includes
  • Assisting students in planning their high school
    program of study by the end of grade nine
  • Having teachers or counselors talk with students
    individually about plans for careers or further
    study
  • Helping students review their programs of study
    at least annually
  • Providing each student with an adult mentor
    throughout high school

123
A Good Guidance and Advisement Program
  • Provides students with opportunities to speak
    with persons in careers to which they aspire
  • Provides information on college and postsecondary
    studies to all students and parents
  • Educates teachers, parents, and students about
    the level of achievement needed for postsecondary
    study and high demand jobs

124
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Guidance Assistance
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Before and during high school they talked to their parents or guardians at least once a year about planning a four-year course plan 4 5
During high school a teacher or counselor talked to them individually about their plans for a career or further education. 7 5
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
125
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Guidance Assistance
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Someone from a college talked to them about going to college 6 7
A teacher or guidance counselor helped them review a program of study at least once a year 3 2
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
126
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Guidance Assistance
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Received the most help in planning a high school program of studies by the end of ninth grade 4 4
They and/or their parents received information or assistance from someone at school about selecting or applying to college 1 6
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
127
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Experienced High-quality Guidance Assistance
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
They spoke with or visited someone in a career they aspire to 2 2
They had an adult mentor or adviser who worked with them all four years of high school - 1 3
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
128
Effective Guidance System and Higher Achievement
54 40
6
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
129
System of Guidance and Advisement, Page 30-31
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to guidance
    and advisement and determine one outstanding
    practice in place.
  • Determine one action to ensure every student has
    a goal and a program of study by the end of 9th
    grade.
  • Determine one action to provide each student with
    an adult mentor throughout high school.
  • Determine one action to ensure students meet at
    least once a year with his/her parent or guardian
    and a school representative to review progress
    toward the program of study.

130
Key Practice Extra Help Provide a structured
system of extra help to assist students in
completing an accelerated program of study.
HSTW
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
131
Extra Help is important because it
HSTW
  • Reduces failure rates
  • Reduces the ninth grade retention rate
  • Increases the high school graduation rate
  • Encourages students to stretch themselves

132
A Comprehensive Extra Help Program Must Include
HSTW
  • Continuous extra help to meet standards
  • Middle grades actions
  • Ninth-grade transition
  • High school, postsecondary and careers
    transitions
  • Develop independent learners

133
Effective Extra Help
HSTW
  • Is available, without difficulty, from the
    teacher
  • Is available before, during or after school
  • Results in motivating students to try harder
  • Results in better grades
  • Builds students sense of self worth

134
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Received Extra Help
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Their teachers frequently were available before, during or after school to help them with their studies - 2 4
They often were able to get extra help from their teachers when they needed it without much difficulty. 5 11
Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment
135
Significantly More Students in 2006 than in 2004
Received Extra Help
Students said WV Pilot Sites Most-Imp.
Extra help they received at school often helped them understand their schoolwork better 6 8
Extra help they received at school often helped them to get better grades Source WV Special Report, 2006 HSTW Assessment 5 7
136
Quality Extra Help andHigher Achievement
24 18
58
Source WV Enhanced Sites 2006 HSTW Assessment
and Student Survey
137
Implementation Issues
HSTW
  • How do you identify students who need it?
  • How do you require students to attend?
  • How do you get parents commitment?
  • How will extra help be delivered?
  • Who will teach it?
  • How will the strategy or strategies be matched to
    student needs?

138
Extra Help Strategies
HSTW
  • Peer Tutoring
  • On-line Tutoring and Computer-Assisted
    Instruction
  • After School Programs (and Morning and Saturday
    Programs)
  • Credit Recovery Classes
  • Organized Student Study Teams

139
Why target middle school transition?
HSTW
  • The transition point from middle school to high
    school has the highest percentages of dropouts
    nation wide.
  • The highest failure rate occurs in grade nine.
  • Preparing students for high school work, directly
    impacts retention.

140
How can school leaders make sure that students
are ready for rigorous high school studies?
HSTW
  • District, high school and middle school leaders
    can
  • Establish readiness indicators for challenging
    high school English, mathematics and science
    courses
  • Align curriculums, teacher assignments and
    assessments to the readiness indicators
  • Set goals to annually increase the percentages of
    students having successfully completed Algebra I
    by the end of grade eight

141
Actions for Transition from Middle Grades to High
School
HSTW
  • Structured extra help programs in grades 7 and 8
  • 4 to 6 week summer bridge program for students
    who need accelerated instruction in math, English
    and reading
  • Develop courses in grades seven and eight to give
    extended time to read, write and do math

142
Actions for Transition from Middle Grades to High
School Continued
HSTW
  • Orient students and parents to high school
    expectations
  • Reduce the ratio of students to teachers in grade
    nine
  • Get a master teacher to lead a team of teachers
    in core academic courses in grade nine

143
What makes a ninth-grade catch-up program
high-quality?
HSTW
  • Early identification of students
  • A lower student-teacher ratio in grade nine
  • Qualified teachers with depth of content
    knowledge teach challenging content
  • School schedules are modified to allow students
    to be double-dosed English/reading and
    mathematics

144
What makes a ninth-grade catch-up program
high-quality?
  • Standard-based Curriculum with unit planning by
    teachers
  • Teachers are organized into planning teams so
    they can plan together
  • Recruit the best teachers to lead the ninth-grade
    teams
  • Move beyond remedial instructional
  • Comprehensive evaluation plan

145
Organize a Ninth-Grade School/Academy
HSTW
  • Separate grade nine from the rest of the school
  • Get parent support
  • Organize into a series of learning communities
  • teams of teachers
  • common groups of students
  • common planning time

146
Why target postsecondary transition?
HSTW
  • Senior year not taken seriously
  • Low ACT and SAT scores
  • High remedial rate in English and mathematics
  • Students unprepared for workforce
  • National completion rate for college only 39.9

147
Research Based Strategies for Postsecondary
Transition
HSTW
  • Students earn college credit while in high school
  • Enroll unprepared students in transition
    mathematics and English courses
  • Courses aligned to college and career readiness
    standards
  • Ensure that students who do not plan to go on to
    further study are in a CT program
  • Develop extra help for students having trouble
    graduating (credit recovery)

148
Additional Actions for Making the Senior Year
Count
HSTW
  • Have community college administer placement exam
    during 11th grade
  • ACT Test for everyone in 11th grade
  • Reality check prior to the senior year with
    parents, adviser and counselor
  • Enroll seniors in upper-level courses
  • Enroll all seniors in at least five
    credit-bearing courses
  • Consider requiring a senior project that includes
    a research paper, a product or service, an oral
    presentation and a power point

149
Extra Help/Transitions
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to the key
    practice and determine one outstanding practice
    in place.
  • Determine three major actions to improve ongoing,
    timely extra help at your school.
  • Extra help to remove the I
  • Grade recovery strategies
  • Credit recovery strategies

See Pages 32-34 of Planner
150
Extra Help/Transitions
HSTW
  • Determine three major actions to identify at-risk
    students and improve their ninth-grade
    transition.
  • Work with Middle Grades to accelerate instruction
    for at-risk students, grades 7-8
  • Plan a summer bridge program
  • Design a ninth-grade program aimed at catching up
    students
  • Determine three major actions to improve high
    school to college and career transitions.
  • Enrolling ready students in college-credit
    bearing courses
  • Getting students ready for college
  • Helping students earn an employer certification
  • See Pages 32-34 of Planner

151
  • Team Planning

152
Focus on What You Can Change
  • Structure Rigor of what is taught and what is
    expected.
  • Quality Instruction How students are taught.
  • Support for Students How staff relates to
    students.
  • Support for Teachers How teachers learn and
    related to each other.
  • Leadership How leaders work for continuous
    improvement.

153
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase by 10 percent annually the percentage of
    students completing the enhanced academic core.
  • How will you do it?
  • Who will design the implementation plan?
  • Who will implement it?
  • How and who will keep score?

154
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase annually by four courses where A, B, C
    not yet is applied start September 2007 with
    most frequently failed courses in grades nine and
    10.
  • How will you do it?
  • Who will design the implementation plan?
  • Who will give leadership to implementation?
  • Who will see that support is provided to students
    and teachers?
  • How will you keep score?

155
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase by 10 percent annually the percentage of
    students reporting intensive literacy experiences
    across the curriculum.
  • How will you develop a school-wide literacy plan?
  • Who will lead the implementation?
  • How will you support teachers and students?
  • How will you keep score?

156
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase by 10 percent annually the percentage of
    students reporting quality mathematics and
    science instruction.
  • How will you design a plan?
  • Who will lead the implementation?
  • How will you support teachers and students?
  • How will you keep score
  • How will you make greater use of applied methods
    including the integration into other subjects?

157
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase by 10 percent annually the percentage of
    students experiencing intensive guidance
    assistance and getting extra help early that
    resulted in better grades.
  • How will you do it?
  • Who will design it?
  • Who will lead the implementation?
  • How will you find time and resources for it?
  • How will you keep score?

158
Action goals forSeptember, 2007, 2008 and 2009
  • Increase by 10 percent annually teachers who
    believe the school has an intensive continuous
    improvement climate.
  • What will school and teacher leaders to
    differently?
  • Who will lead?
  • How will you keep score?

159
Team Planning
  1. Prioritize Actions
  2. Determine how you will take this back to your
    faculty Determine steps to form focus teams and
    make them active
  3. Develop expectations for focus teams
  4. Add HSTW actions to your school improvement plan
    submit action plan in 90 days

Page 33-38 of planner
160
Suggestions for Building Faculty Support
  • 3-Hour Orientation
  • Admit Slip/Enhanced HSTW Brochure
  • SREB Orientation PowerPoint
  • Create Cross-Curricular Teams
  • Each team take one action goal for 2007
  • Submit results of brainstorming to school
    improvement team

161
Establish Need for ChangeShare Information with
faculty and students
  • Through gap analysis
  • Determine number of students who could earn a C
    in college courses based on ACT scores
  • Obtain numbers of students who are in remedial
    courses in post-secondary
  • Teachers conduct interviews with graduates and
    report back to faculty

162
Establish Need for Change Engaging faculty in
gap analysis
  • Opportunity Gap
  • Who is enrolled in which courses?
  • Majority/minority
  • Free/reduced lunch
  • Gender
  • Expectations Gap
  • Variances in expectations across courses
  • Variances in literacy across the curriculum
  • Survey students/teachers
  • Achievement Gap
  • Course levels enrolled in by ACT
    (College/non-College core)
  • Expectations
  • Grade level analysis (grade 9)

163
HSTW
Create Focus Teams and Get Them Organized
  • Select Chair Recorder
  • Chair Keeps group on target, moving and
    involves all
  • Timekeeper Limits time per speaker, gets group
    back for large meeting
  • Recorder Get the information down for all
  • Everybody Get the job done
  • See page 30-33 of Planner.

164
Focus Teams Develop Implementation Steps for
Actions
HSTW
  • Assign a major action to one or more of the focus
    teams
  • Draft a charge to the team regarding
    implementation of this action in year 1
  • Have teams develop an implementation plan for the
    action, present it to the school improvement team
    and eventually to the entire faculty
  • When year 1 is completed, start work on year 2
  • Ask teams to develop benchmarks and monitor plan
    for implementation

165
Ideas to Introduce HSTW to Faculty
  • SREB materials/newsletters
  • Send teams to national staff development
    workshops
  • Teams share and implement ideas
  • Visit outstanding HSTW sites
  • Create study teams around selected materials
  • Seek input on implementation plan
  • Technical Assistance Visits

166
Take Some Action in Year 1Dont wait a year,
but do it well.
  • What five to seven things can your staff do in
    year 1?
  • Determine steps to form focus teams and make them
    active.
  • See Page 30 of Planner

167
Next 30 Days Establish Focus Teams
HSTW
  • Present priority actions developed during the
    workshop to entire staff
  • Form focus teams and assign priority actions to
    teams
  • Ask teams to develop implementation plans

168
Second 30 Days Focus Team Development
Implementation Plans
  • School improvement team reviews initial draft of
    focus team implementation steps with timeline and
    benchmarks
  • Have staff review implementation plan
  • Develop revised implementation plan based on
    staff review

169
Third 30 Days Present Implementation Plans to
District Leadership
  • Present implementation to district staff
  • Revise based on district staff input

170
Fourth Month Present to All for Approval and
State Implementation
  • Present final implementation plan to all
    constituents
  • Start planning implementation of proposed action
    plans for year 2
  • Continue implementation of year 1 actions

Final plan due to state by
171
School Leadership Team Identify staff
development needed based on implementation plan
  • School leader
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