Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development Workshop: Implementing an Effort-based Action Plan - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development Workshop: Implementing an Effort-based Action Plan

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Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development Workshop: Implementing an Effort-based Action Plan September 14-15, 2011 Parke Hotel Bloomington, Illinois – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development Workshop: Implementing an Effort-based Action Plan


1
Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development
WorkshopImplementing an Effort-basedAction
Plan September 14-15, 2011Parke
HotelBloomington, IllinoisLois
Barneslois.barnes_at_sreb.org
HSTW
2
Welcome! Do Now!
  • Fix School Name Tent (hot dog style
    School Name LARGE)
  • Table Talk Think back over the last school year
    (s).
  • What is ONE major accomplishment related to
    school improvement for your school in 2010-2011 ?
  • What is ONE problem related to school improvement
    that you think needs to be faced / addressed for
    2011-2012 in your school?

3
Welcome and Introductions
HSTW
  • Introduction of state staff and workshop
    facilitator and orientation to state efforts
    underway
  • School team introductions
  • Review agenda,
  • planner, and
  • materials

SDW
3
4
Housekeeping
  • Phone calls
  • Restrooms
  • Breaks
  • Punctuality
  • Sharing
  • Rule of Two Feet

5
Ask It Basket
6
Re-energizer Site DevelopmentWorkshop Objectives
HSTW
  • Renew awareness and understanding of HSTW
  • Goals
  • Key Conditions
  • Key Practices
  • Use data throughout the workshop to identify
    school improvement priorities based on the HSTW
    Key Practices
  • Utilize a six-step process as a framework for
    focus teams to address school improvement
    challenges, focusing on identified priorities
  • Review resources and other supports for deeper
    implementation of HSTW

7
Site DevelopmentWorkshop Format
HSTW
  • Assess your schools focus team structure
  • Apply a Six-Step process for school improvement
  • Review the Ten HSTW Key Practices priority
    improvement areas
  • Discuss why each one is important
  • Identify key indicators
  • Table teams determine your current status and
    brainstorm root causes
  • Table teams identify actions taken by successful
    schools
  • Table teams agree on goals and strategies to
    implement

7
8
The Foundation of the Designs Effort
Magnifies AbilityContinuous effort not
strength or intelligence is the key to
unlocking our potential.Winston Churchill
9
HSTW Key Conditionsfor Accelerating Student
Achievement
  • A clear, functional mission statement
  • Strong leadership
  • Plan for continuous improvement
  • Quality teachers
  • Commitment to goals
  • Flexible scheduling opportunities
  • Support for professional development

SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
9
10
Purpose-DrivenMission Statements
  • Guess the Company

11
To satisfy the worlds appetite for good
food, well-served, at a price people can
afford.
12
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13
To organize the world's information and make it
universally accessible and useful.
14
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15
"To solve unsolved problems innovatively
16
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17
"To give unlimited opportunity to women"
18
(No Transcript)
19
A passion to create plus a mission to enrich
lives
20
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21
"To give ordinary folk the chance to buy the
same things as rich people"
22
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23
"To make people happy"
24
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25
Four Schools
The Charles Darwin School
The Pontius Pilate School
We believe all kids can learn . . . if they
take advantage of the opportunity we give them to
learn.
We believe all kids can learn . . . based on
their ability.
The Henry Higgins School
The Chicago Cub Fan School
We believe all kids can learn . . . something,
and we will help all students experience academic
growth in a warm and nurturing environment.
We believe all kids can learn . . . and we will
work to help all students achieve high standards
of learning.
Source DuFour, Dufour, Eaker, Karhanek
(2004).Whatever it Takes
26
A Purpose Driven Mission
  • Guides school and classroom practices and
    decision making at every level.

27
Think and Act Page 2
  • Group Discussion
  • What is your schools Mission?
  • Is there a 5-7 word tagline that can easily
    capture your purpose/mission?
  • How can the mission/tagline drive decision-making
    at school?
  • Create a Bumper sticker for your table
  • Does it communicate a clear purpose that will
    guide everyday responsibilities at school?
  • Be prepared to share a summary of your tables
    discussion with the large group.

28
Purpose-Driven, Functional Mission - Examples
HSTW
  • High School graduate students prepared for
    further study without remediation or to enter a
    program to earn industry certification.
  • Middle Grades prepare students to enter high
    school performing at grade level in order to
    succeed in college-preparatory courses.

28
29
HSTW Fundamental Beliefs
  • Read the Beliefs in the Planner on page 2.
  • Discuss what each belief looks like in
    practice. (What would you see, hear, say?)
  • Discuss as a table
  • Which Beliefs are in place and drive school
    practices?
  • Which Beliefs need additional emphasis?
  • Estimate the percentage of staff whose practices
    indicate they hold each belief.
  • What actions can the school take to get more
    faculty to embrace the core beliefs?

29
30
HSTW and MMGW Fundamental Beliefs
  • Almost all students can and will make the effort
    to learn standards if adults create the right
    conditions
  • All students should be enrolled in a program of
    study that will prepare them for further study
    and a career
  • Students who have a goal and see meaning and
    purpose in learning are more motivated to learn

30
31
HSTW and MMGW Fundamental Beliefs
  • Students learn best when they have a personal
    connection to the school
  • Students learn best when teachers maintain a
    demanding and supportive environment
  • Students change behavior and become more
    motivated to meet school goals when adults use
    school and classroom practices based on effort
    rather than ability.
  • All faculty should be involved in continuously
    improving teaching and learning.

31
32
To change student outcomes, schools must change
adult practices!
33
HSTW Key Practicesto Get Students to Put Forth
Greater Effort
HSTW
  • Challenging Programs of Study
  • Challenging Career/Technical Studies
  • Work-based Learning
  • High Expectations
  • Challenging Academic Studies
  • Students Actively Engaged
  • Teachers Working Together
  • Guidance and Advisement
  • Extra Help and Transitions
  • Using Data for Continuous Improvement

34
Data Graffiti Walk
  • Starting with the poster where you are
  • With a partner or small group, record on the
    poster
  • Thoughts
  • Doodles/graphics
  • Concepts
  • related to the data and question about the
    Illinois composite data presented on the poster.
  • When I call time, move to the next poster and
    repeat.

35
Data Graffiti Walk Debrief
  • Relationship between school and classroom
    practices and student performance
  • What can we control?
  • What will it cost to make changes?

36
Debriefing the Data Graffiti Walk
  • What makes HSTW schools different?
  • Relationship between school and classroom
    practices and student performance focus on
    improving students experiences
  • Effort, not ability
  • Successful schools are improving by focusing on
    things they control and influence
  • We must take ownership of what we can control.

37
The Essential Question
HSTW
  • Why do students at most-improved schools make
    greater gains in achievement than students at
    non-improved schools?

38
The Detailed Answer
  • More students at most-improved schools
  • Completed the HSTW-recommended curriculum in
    reading, math and science
  • Experienced high expectations in the classroom
  • Experienced reading, writing and math skills
    across the curriculum
  • Were engaged in science
  • Experienced quality career/technical studies and
    work-based learning
  • Had access to quality extra help and guidance
  • Understood the importance of learning and doing
    well in high school

39
The Short Answer
HSTW
  • The most-improved schools more fully implemented
    the HSTW design.
  • They took action to increase student achievement.

40
Key PracticeContinuous Improvement Use
student achievement and program evaluation data
to continuously improve school culture,
organization, management, curriculum and
instruction to advance student learning.
HSTW
SDW
40
41
About the HSTW Assessment
  • HSTW is a research-based school improvement model
  • HSTW Assessment is used to set baselines,
    acknowledge progress, identify areas for
    improvement, and set priorities
  • Only initiative combining student achievement
    data with students perceptions of school and
    classroom practices
  • Required of HSTW sites in even-numbered years
  • Administered to seniors to collect data on entire
    high school experience

42
New in 2012
  • HSTW Teacher Survey will be conducted online
  • There will be no constructed response items in
    the assessment
  • The overall assessment time will be shortened by
    20 minutes

43
How Schools Measure the Depth of HSTW
Implementation
  • HSTW Assessment for seniors
  • NAEP-referenced subject tests
  • Reading, Mathematics, Science
  • Scale 0-500
  • Student Survey of Experiences
  • Transcript analysis
  • Teacher Survey
  • Data/Surveys linked to HSTW Key Practices
  • Technical Assistance Visits
  • Annual Reports

43
44
Leadership for Continuous Improvement
Teachers Perception of Continuous School
Improvement
Source 2006, 2008, and 2010 HSTW Assessments
45
Focus on Continuous Improvement
  • Reflect on current practices and as a table group
    rate each indicator
  • 4 Fully Implemented
  • 3 Implemented
  • 2 Some Use
  • 1 Not Implemented
  • Respond with the as to current status.
  • Planner pages 4 and 5.

45
46
Why Work in Teams
SDW
46
47
How Many Do You Remember?
  • Take one minute to work independently to list all
    the items on the preceding slide
  • Hint There were 25.

48
Teams Work Better
  • Now work together in table teams to see if your
    table can come up with all 25.

49
Teams Work Better
50
Why Develop Focus Teams?
HSTW
  • Teachers spend too little time talking about
    their work
  • Leadership teams can sustain the improvement
    effort when a school leader leaves
  • Communication improves
  • Teams come up with better ideas work and
    responsibility are shared
  • None of us is as smart as all of us!
  • Ken Blanchard

SDW
50
51
Organizing Teams for Continuous Planning and
Implementation
  • Five Focus Teams (included in overall school
    improvement team)
  • Curriculum and instruction leadership team
  • Professional development leadership team
  • Guidance and public information leadership team
  • Transitions leadership team
  • Evaluation leadership team

SDW
51
52
What Do Focus Teams Do?
  • Top-performing schools establish a culture of
    continuous improvement supported by teacher focus
    teams that strategic plan for improvement.
    Teams
  • identify challenges
  • research possible solutions
  • identify actions for implementation
  • implement and monitor
  • Each team focuses on a particular aspect of
    school improvement and leads actions to address
    needs.

SDW
52
53
Continuous Improvement Specific Actions
  • Determine how you will organize an overall school
    improvement team and focus teams How will you
    select team members and what content areas will
    be represented on each team?
  • How will you establish expectations for each
    team?
  • What will each focus team have as their charge?
  • What evidence will be collected to monitor your
    status on achieving the HSTW goals?
  • Planner page 6

SDW
53
54
Six-Step Process planner pages 7-24
55
Step 1 Identify the Problem
  • Recognize that there is a problem
  • Be specific in defining the problem
  • Distinguish between performance and process
    problems
  • Performance problems student achievement,
    graduation rates, failure rates, etc.
  • Process problems the school and classroom
    practices and issues that are leading to the
    performance problems

56
How Is Performance Measured?
HSTW
  • State Assessments
  • Teacher Assessments
  • College level assessments (AP, IB)
  • Course Failures (ninth-grade)
  • ACT/SAT Results
  • Attendance Rates
  • Graduation Rates
  • Certification Exam Results
  • Post-Secondary Readiness/Success

SDW
56
57
School Must Also Measure Implementation
HSTW
  • Instructional Reviews
  • Staff Experience Charts
  • Remedial Studies Reports
  • Follow-up studies
  • Drop-out exit reports
  • Master Schedules
  • Walkthrough Observations
  • Focus Group Interviews
  • Graduates Feedback
  • HSTW Assessment Reports

SDW
57
58
Step 1 Identify the Problem
  • Example Allstar High School
  • Performance problem The current four-year
    cohort graduation rate is 65. That rate has been
    decreasing over recent years (72 - 70 - 66).
    Of the current cohorts dropouts, 45 occurred
    during the ninth grade (25 in 10th grade, 20 in
    11th grade and 10 in 12th grade).
  • Process problem Low student engagement in
    lessons, lack of an at-risk identification and
    intervention system, little guidance, no extra
    help, poor CT opportunities

59
Step 2 Identify Possible Causes
  • What factors contribute to the problem?
  • What are the process problems leading to the
    performance problems?
  • Example Poor math achievement may be caused by
    poor instruction
  • What are the factors causing the process
    problems? (School and classroom practices)
  • Example A drill approach to instruction,
    teachers not having adequate content knowledge,
    etc. may be leading to unmotivating instruction
  • Which are the major factors that are most
    responsible for the problem?

60
Value of Root Cause Analysis
Problem identification
Problem solution
  • From
  • To

Problem identification (real problem)
Problem solution (right solution)
Root Causes
Root Causes
61
Diagnostic Tree
  • Source Adapted from Preuss, P. G. (2003). School
    Leaders Guide to Root Cause Analysis Using Data
    to Dissolve Problems. Larchmont, NY Eye On
    Education.

62
Step 2 Identify Possible Causes
  • Example Allstar High School
  • Performance problem causes unengaging
    instruction, lack of an at-risk identification
    and intervention system, transition from middle
    grades, little guidance, no extra help, poor CT
    opportunities
  • Process problem causes school culture, no
    school mission, lack of strong leadership,
    teachers lack interest in students or teaching
  • Major factors unengaging instruction,
    transition from middle grades, and lack of
    at-risk identification and intervention system

63
Step 3 Set goals
  • What do you want to accomplish?
  • Set both performance and process outcomes
  • Performance outcomes student achievement,
    graduation rates, failure rates, etc.
  • Process outcomes changes in school and
    classroom practices
  • Be specific
  • Insufficient Increase math achievement
  • Good Increase the percentage of students
    passing the Algebra I EOC on the first attempt by
    10 each year
  • What will be measured to evaluate the results?

64
Measurable HSTW Goals
  • Students have the academic knowledge and skills
    needed to meet local, state and HSTW achievement
    goals.
  • Ninety (90) percent of students who enter ninth
    grade complete high school four years later.
  • All students leave high school demonstrating
    readiness for further study or careers by 1)
    earning post-secondary credit 2) passing college
    placement examinations or 3) earning employer
    certification or state licensure.
  • Eight-five (85) percent of graduates complete the
    HSTW recommended core curriculum and a
    concentration of four courses in an academic or
    career area.

64
65
What Does Your School Data Reveal?
  • Set bold Goals for 11 and 12
  • Are there specific domains that need attention
  • Can you move more students into Level 4 more
    closely aligned with college readiness
  • Add actions throughout the workshop to reach
    the goals.

66
Step 4 Select strategies (SDW- BrainstormFocus
Teams Will Lead Effort)
  • What changes in school and classroom practices
    should occur to address the causes of the problem
    and meet the goal?
  • How will you create that change?

67
Step 4 Select strategies (SDW- BrainstormFocus
Teams Will Lead Effort)
  • What strategies are available?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages to
    each?
  • What are the obstacles and solutions? What
    resources are required?
  • What professional development is necessary to
    enable faculty and staff to implement the
    selected strategies effectively?
  • What would ideal implementation look like?
  • How will implementation be measured?

68
To change student outcomes, schools must change
adult practices!
69
Actions Schools take to Meet the Goals
  • Teach all students an academic core that prepares
    them for success in further study and careers.
  • Implement school and classroom practices that
    motivate students to work hard to learn.
  • Work to upgrade all CT offerings.
  • Provide students with a goal and a plan to
    achieve that goal.
  • Engage students in learning rigorous content
  • Personalize the learning environment by
    developing a schoolwide teacher advisement
    program.
  • Strengthen transitions into and out of high
    school.

70
4 HSTW Key PracticesPrograms of Study
Academic StudiesCareer Technical Studies
Quality Work Based Learning Taking the Right
Courses Matters
HSTW
Have all students complete a challenging program
of study with an upgraded academic core and a
concentration.
SDW
70
71
Why take Challenging Courses?
HSTW
  • A Challenging Program of Study
  • Is the best predictor of achievement
  • Gives students a focus
  • Prepares students for the next step
  • Makes high school count

SDW
71
72
Taking the Right Classes Matters
  • The academic intensity and quality of ones high
    school curriculum (not test scores, class rank,
    or grade point average) counts most in
    preparation for bachelors degree completion .
    This is particularly true for economically
    disadvantaged, African American and Hispanic
    students.
  • (Clifford Adelman, Tool Box)

73
HSTW Recommended Academic Core for All Students
HSTW
  • Four courses in college-preparatory English
  • Four mathematics courses Algebra I, geometry,
    Algebra II and above
  • Three college-prep, lab-based science courses
    four courses with a block schedule
  • Three social studies courses four courses with a
    block schedule
  • Mathematics and science in the senior year
  • Read further definitions in your planner on pages
    25-26

SDW
73
74
Concentration
  • Humanities
  • Math/Science
  • Career Technical Area

75
(No Transcript)
76
(No Transcript)
77
(No Transcript)
78
HSTW 2010 Percentage of All Students Meeting
Readiness Goals by Completion of Core Curriculum
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
79
Too Many Students Do Not Complete High School
  • U.S. graduation rate (2007-2008) 74.9
  • Graduation rates over 80NJ, SD, NE, PA, MO, MA
  • Graduation rates 75 to 80IL, MD, ID, KS, OH,
    OK, WV, VA, HI, AR, TN
  • Graduation rates under 75KY, IN, TX, NC, DE,
    NY, AL, FL, NM, GA, MS, LA, D.C.

Source NCES 2010
80
The Cost of Dropouts
  • A HS dropout contributes about 60,000 less in
    taxes over a lifetime
  • Dropouts from the class of 2007 will cost the
    U.S. 330 billion in lost wages and productivity
    over their lifetime
  • America could save more than 17 billion in
    Medicaid and expenditures for health care for the
    uninsured by graduating all students
  • If the male graduation rate were increased 5,
    the nation would see an annual savings of 4.9
    billion in crime-related costs
  • (Source Alliance for Excellent Education, 2007)

81
Strategies for Implementing the HSTW Core
Curriculum
HSTW
  • Enroll ALL students in the recommended core as
    the default curriculum
  • Eliminate 15-20 percent of low-level
    courses/sections annually by enrolling more
    students in higher level courses
  • Investigate alternative schedules to allow more
    time for students to take critical courses
  • Create recruitment plans for each department to
    have teachers push students to take
    higher-level courses
  • Expand opportunities for students to participate
    in AP, IB and dual enrollment courses
  • Have each student develop a program of study
    including the recommended core and a
    concentration and use the programs of study to
    change the scheduling process

81
82
HSTW
Key PracticeChallenging Career/Technical Studies
Provide more students access to intellectually
challenging career/technical studies that
emphasize the higher-level mathematics, literacy
and problem-solving skills needed in the
workplace and in further education.
82
83
Purposes of High School Career/Technical Studies
HSTW
  • Prepare students for further study and careers
  • Advance technical literacy, numeracy and
    problem-solving skills
  • Understand technical concepts
  • Read and comprehend technical materials
  • Apply mathematical concepts within chosen field
  • Solve problems and think critically
  • Keep students in school

84
Quality Career Technical Studies- Jigsaw
Literacy StrategyCombining Academic and
Technical Studies to Prepare Students for College
and Careers
  • 1s - Newsletter pages 1 4
  • 2s Newsletter pages 5-8
  • 3s Newsletter article pages 9-11
  • 4s Newsletter article pages 12-14

85
Academic Impact of Quality C/T Programs
  • Quality Career/Technical programs can boost
    reading achievement by 3 to 4 levels (3 to 4
    grades) when students feel the need to learn
    for application.
  • Gary Hoachlander

86
Quality Career/Technical Programs Matter
HSTW
  • Improve high school retention
  • Increase understanding of academic content
  • Give meaning to school
  • Motivate students
  • Improve retention of academic skills
  • Get students on track faster after graduation
  • Helps students discover career options

SDW
86
87
Quality Career/Technical Studiesand Higher
Achievement
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
87
88
Strengthening C/T Studies
HSTW
  • Enroll at-risk students in at least one C/T
    credit course annually
  • Offer ninth grade, project-based, exploratory
    course introducing broad career fields
  • Increase the number of students completing a
    concentration of courses that lead to industry
    certification
  • Expand opportunities for students to earn
    post-secondary credit or certifications
  • Emphasize literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving
    in all C/T classrooms.

89
Strategies to Strengthen C/T Courses
HSTW
  • Create C/T anchor project assessments - interim
    and end-of course - that reflect industry
    standards and require use of literacy and
    numeracy skills
  • Purposefully embed academics in all C/T courses
  • Require a career-focused senior (capstone)
    project
  • Get input from local business and industry
    partners to strengthen applications of
    career/tech content and expand WBL/internships

90
Key PracticeQuality Work-Based Learning
Enable students and their parents to choose
from programs that integrate challenging high
schools studies and work-based learning and are
planned by educators, employers and students.
HSTW
SDW
90
91
What Makes a Quality WBL Program?
HSTW
  • Classroom and work assignments correlate to
    career field
  • Work experiences connect to career goals
  • Students have a mentor at work

SDW
91
92
Work-based Learning Opportunities More than
Just a Job
HSTW
  • Job Shadowing
  • Guest Speakers
  • Service Learning Requirements
  • Cooperative Work Experiences
  • Short-term Internships
  • School-based Enterprises
  • Virtual Enterprises
  • Youth Apprenticeships
  • Others?

93
Quality Work-Based Learning Programs Have High
Expectations for Students
HSTW
  • They require students to
  • Attend a regular class and/or seminar
  • Plan experiences with employer and teacher
  • Keep a journal of experiences
  • Develop a career portfolio

SDW
93
94
Quality Work-Based Learning and Higher Achievement
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
94
95
Priority Planning The Right Courses for All
Students- Rigorous and Relevant Program of Study
Subject Area Page
ELA 27-28
MATH 29-30
SCIENCE 31
SOCIAL STUDIES 32
ELECTIVES 33
CT and WBL 34-35
ALL 36
96
Putting It All Together
  • Creating a Career-themed Program of Study for a
    Student

97
Each Students Program of Study Includes
  • Planned Sequence of Courses
  • Recommended academic core for all students
  • Concentration aligned to a career
  • Potential internships/work-based learning
  • Also
  • Postsecondary options
  • Career Opportunities
  • Industry certifications
  • Planned set of co-curricular activities
  • Student support opportunities

98
Schools Create Programs of Study
  • Based upon
  • Labor market needs
  • Current offerings
  • Opportunities to link with area postsecondary
    institutions
  • Recommendations from the community

99
Students Use the Program of Study
  • To achieve their postsecondary goals
  • Determine classes for each grade level
  • To give them a plan for success

100
Priority Planning The Right Courses for All
Students- Rigorous and Relevant Program of Study
  • Respond to statements on planner pages 27-36
  • individually (5 minutes).
  • 1 Not implemented
  • 2 Some use
  • 3 Implemented
  • 4 Fully Implemented
  • Discuss with those at your table (15 minutes)
  • Best Practices
  • Performance and Process Problem
  • Possible Causes
  • Potential Strategies

101
Key PracticesActively Engaging
StudentsandTeachers Working Together
HSTW
  • Engage students in academic and career/technical
    classrooms in rigorous assignments using
    research-based instructional strategies.

SDW
101
102
Key Practice Teachers Working Together
HSTW
  • Provide teams of teachers from several
    disciplines the time and support to work together
    to help students succeed in challenging academic
    and career/technical studies.
  • Integrate reading, writing and speaking as
    strategies for learning in all parts of the
    curriculum and integrate mathematics and science
    in career/technical classrooms.

103
Why Focus on Student Engagement?
  • Student boredom is number one reason given for
    dropouts
  • Students are more engaged when they can build on
    prior knowledge and see connections to the world
    they live in.
  • Even small opportunities for choice give students
    a greater sense of autonomy.
  • Students are more engaged when sharing what they
    are learning is needed by others in the group to
    complete an assignment.

104
Learning Pyramid
1
Refer to page 37 in the planner
10
20
30
50
70
90
95
98
104
105
Learning Pyramid
Fill out worksheet
Reading Assignment
Lecture
Using only visuals
Lecture with visuals
Discussion with others
Having a personal experience Making
connections (hands on)
Teaching someone else
Use art, drama, music, movement Integrated
curriculum with content
105
106
Student Engagement Is
  • Challenging assignments that stretch students to
    develop ideas and problem-solve
  • Linking content to a topic students want to learn
    more about
  • Having students go on stage to present
    something they have learned very well.
  • Students working collaboratively to complete
    real-world projects or solve real-world problems.
  • Requiring students to use 21st Century Skills

107
Reading and Writing for Learning Across the
Curriculum
Intensive Emphasis on Literacy Across the
Curriculum and Percentage Meeting the Reading
Readiness Goal
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
108
Quality Mathematics Instruction
Intensive Emphasis on Numeracy Across the
Curriculum and Percentage Meeting Mathematics
Readiness Goal
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
109
Engaging Science
Intensive Emphasis on Engaging Science and
Percentage Meeting Science Readiness Goal
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
110
Focus on Literacy
HSTW
  • SREB Literacy Goals
  • Students will read the equivalent of 25 books per
    year across the curriculum.
  • Students will write weekly in all classes.
  • Students will use reading and writing strategies
    to help them understand and use the content of
    all classes.
  • Students will write investigative research papers
    in all classes.
  • Students will be taught as if they were in honors
    language arts classes.

111
HSTW
Six Key Reading Skills
  • Summarizing
  • Paraphrasing
  • Categorizing
  • Inferring
  • Predicting
  • Recognizing Academic Vocabulary

112
Numeracy Actions
  • Math embedded in C/T
  • Math teachers link content to the real world
  • Expand math/science link
  • Create a math in P.E. focus
  • Students use technology effectively
  • Math processes (problem solving, analysis of
    information) in all classes
  • Use of charts, tables graphs in all classes
  • Using appropriate math terminology in all classes
  • Strive to create a positive math attitude
  • What else?

113
Improving Instruction through Effective Planning
  • Expand from individual lesson planning around a
    specific standard to unit planning where teachers
    cluster similar standards
  • Teachers need time for this new type of planning
  • Teachers need professional development in the
    unit planning process
  • Teachers work together to analyze the quality of
    units using the unit planning rubric

113
114
Teachers Working TogetherIntegration Indicators
for Higher Achievement
HSTW
  • Students believe their teachers work together.
  • Mathematics and science teachers use real-world
    problems.
  • Career/technical teachers require students to
    read, write and use mathematics.
  • Students complete a senior project.
  • Students receive work-site instruction on
    communications and mathematics.

115
Embedding Academics into CT
Intensive Emphasis on Embedding Academics into CT
and Percentage Meeting Reading and Mathematics
Readiness Goals
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
116
Are we giving students experiencesthat connect
literacy and mathematics to careers?
  • Yes, when we
  • Infuse academic content into CT courses and
    incorporate authentic assignments into academic
    courses.
  • Make greater use of internships, projects and
    problem-based learning.
  • Connect abstract academic content to authentic
    work in a particular career to foster greater
    effort from unmotivated students.

116
117
Conditions for Supporting Integration
HSTW
  • Common planning time
  • Standards-based, not activity-based
  • Create organizational structure that will support
    teacher collaboration
  • Provide large blocks of instructional time for
    completion of complex tasks
  • Provide professional development to support
    teachers
  • Establish clear expectations for teachers
    Collaboration by invitation does not work

118
Table Teams (p. 38-40)
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to literacy,
    numeracy and teachers working together and
    determine one outstanding practice in place.
  • Determine actions your school can take to
  • Create a Literacy Across the Curriculum Focus
  • Improve Numeracy Across the Curriculum
  • Develop a culture of instructional planning by
    developing units of study
  • Increase Integration of Instruction

119
Key PracticeHigh Expectations Hold students
to rigorous high school readiness standards and
reorganize time and resources to provide students
the extra help needed to meet those standards.
HSTW
SDW
119
120
The Foundation of the Design Effort Magnifies
AbilityContinuous effort not strength or
intelligence is the key to unlocking our
potential.Winston Churchill
121
EFFORT vs. ABILITY
  • We have to believe before students can believe
    that hard work pays off, that effort matters,
    that success depends not on your genes but on
    your sweat. What we GIVE to the BEST, we want
    for the REST!

Gene BottomsSenior Vice PresidentSREB
122
Who is putting forth effort?
123
Why Raise Expectations?
HSTW
  • Communicates that high school counts
  • Gives students a sense of self-worth
  • Helps students see that the school believes in
    them
  • Helps students be more focused, motivated and
    goal-oriented
  • Prepares students for the next level

SDW
123
124
ACT Says
  • High school students who plan to enter workforce
    training programs after they graduate need
    academic skills similar to those of college-bound
    students.
  • An ACT Policy Alert Ready for CollegeReady for
    Workforce Training, 2006.

124
125
Students Experiencing High Expectations Practices
Achieve Higher
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
125
126
Raising Expectations by Holding Students
Accountable
HSTW
  • Number off 1 to 5!

SDW
126
127
Raising Expectations by Holding Students
Accountable
HSTW
  • Four Corners Debate
  • Students should be given opportunities to redo
    work so that their grade is not affected by the
    number of times it takes to achieve the
    standard.

SDW
127
128
Day One Exit Tickets
129
Illinois Statewide Re-Energizer Site Development
WorkshopImplementing an Effort-basedAction
Plan Day TwoSeptember 15, 2011
HSTW
130
Reflections on Day OneFeedback from Exit Tickets
131
Gains in Percentages of Students Meeting
Readiness Goals Who Experienced High Expectations
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
132
Raising Expectations
  • Increasing the rigor in classrooms
  • Level of questioning
  • Defining grade level work
  • Clear definitions in course syllabi (more than a
    number)
  • Focus on college and career readiness
  • Rubrics
  • Quality Student Work
  • Grading Practices
  • Failure is Not an Option
  • Standards-based Grading
  • Use of Incomplete Grades
  • Teachers Working Together to Create Common
    Expectations
  • Course Syllabi
  • End-of-course and end-of-unit
  • Analyzing Student Work

133
Rigor The Focus for Many Schools
  • What does rigor mean?

134
What is Rigor?
What Does It Look Like in Academic Classrooms
What Does It Look Like Across the School
Rigor
Ways Leaders Support It
What Does It Look Like in CTE Classrooms
135
HSTW Frayer
  • What Does It Look Like Across the School
  • Clear Expectations for Academic Achievement/Redo
  • College/Career Readiness Focus
  • Common Policies/Syllabi/Exams
  • What Does It Look Like in Academic Classrooms
  • Redoing work
  • Literacy Focus
  • High level questions
  • Units aligned to standards

Rigor
  • What Does It Look Like in CTE Classrooms
  • Concentrations, not courses
  • Academics in CTE
  • Anchor Projects
  • Work-based Learning Opps
  • Ways Leaders Support It
  • Time for teachers to work together
  • Using walkthroughs to collect instructional data

136
Do You Have RIGOR?
137
Rigor-Related Research The Silent Epidemic (2006)
  • 69 of dropouts said they were not motivated or
    inspired to work hard.
  • 80 of dropouts said they were required one hour
    or less of homework each day in high school.
  • 66 of dropouts reported they would have worked
    harder if more was demanded of them.

Source Bridgeland, J.M., Dilulio, J.H.,
Morison, K.B. (2006). The silent epidemic
Perspectives of high school dropouts. Washington,
DC Bill Melinda Gates Foundation.
138
Rigor-Related Recommendations from Dropouts
  • Make school interesting (71).
  • Help students who have trouble learning (55).
  • Offer more real-world learning opportunities
    (81).
  • Have smaller classes with more individual
    instruction (75).

Source Bridgeland, J.M., Dilulio, J.H.,
Morison, K.B. (2006). The silent epidemic
Perspectives of high school dropouts. Washington,
DC Bill Melinda Gates Foundation.
139
What is Rigor?
  • Rigor is the goal of helping students develop
    the capacity to understand content that is
    complex, ambiguous, provocative, and personally
    or emotionally challenging.
  • Source Strong, Harvey F. Silver, and Matthew J.
    Perini

140
Another Definition of Rigor
  • Rigor is the expectation that students will be
    able to perform at levels of cognitive complexity
    necessary for proficiency at each grade level and
    college- and career-readiness standards.

141
Student achievement will never rise above the
assignments and assessments students are given.
141
142
Assignment Levels Decline
As Grade Level Increases, the Assignments Given
to Students Fall Further and Further Behind Grade
Level Standards
Source John Holton, South Carolina Department of
Education, analysis of assignments from
Elementary and Middle Schools.
142
143
Pattern Continues in HS
Source John Holton, South Carolina Department of
Education, analysis of English Language Arts -
Assignments in High Schools
143
144
Defining Grades
  • Teachers indicating the amount and quality of
    work required to make an A or B is a key to
    increased student achievement.
  • What is A WorkB WorkC Work
  • Write a description that
  • distinguishes each level of work.

144
145
Defining Advanced, Proficient, Basic and Below
Basic
  • Advanced signifies superior performance above
    grade level honors level work
  • Proficient represents solid academic
    performance at grade level work
  • Basic denotes partial mastery of prerequisite
    knowledge passing but not at grade level
  • Below Basic denotes performance that is below
    grade level failed to meet the very rudimentary
    skills needed for going forward

145
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147
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149
Raising Expectations by Holding Students
Accountable
HSTW
  • Table Talk Grading and Learning
  • Do grades reflect what your students know of the
    required content?
  • Do grades reflect compliance with directions and
    timeliness?
  • What is the purpose of grades anyway?

SDW
149
150
Raising Expectations
HSTW
  • Review your current status on High Expectations
    Indicators (p. 41)
  • Best Practices
  • Problemcauses
  • Determine possible strategies to raise
    expectations across the school

SDW
150
151
Grading Practices that Encourage Effort
  • Get assignments to grade level standards.
  • Make sure assignments are worth doing.
  • Teachers are clear on the work it takes to earn
    an A, B, C.
  • Decide what to do with students that do not earn
    an A, B, C.
  • Students must be held accountable
  • for meeting the standards.

SDW
151
152
Advantages ofStandards-based Grading
  • Helps create a culture of high expectations where
    excuses are not tolerated
  • You dont get to choose not to do it
  • Eliminates the blame game Changes conversations
    with parents
  • Promotes more students mastering grade level
    standards and gives you a better idea of how many
    are meeting standards
  • Can lead to a protocol-driven extra help system.
  • Fear of failure does not motivate
  • those used to failure!

SDW
152
153
Essential Conditions
  • Work below a B is not good enough
  • Frequent and consistent feedback
  • Late work is just that late but it must be
    completed if teachers are to correctly determine
    if students know and understand the standards
    being taught and assessed
  • Students must be given extra help opportunities
    (required) to complete the work during the school
    day (not during the class ever), after school,
    Saturday School, or whatever fits the schools
    possibilities.
  • This is RTI Tier 1 and Tier 2!

SDW
153
154
Teachers Working Together to Create Common
Expectations
  • Teachers create common course syllabi that
    clearly define the level of work required for
    success
  • Teachers create common exams
  • Formative Assessments
  • End-of-unit
  • End-of-Course
  • Teachers use protocols to analyze assignments,
    assessments and student work to ensure the work
    meets standards.

155
Strategies for Establishing Higher Expectations
HSTW
  • Create school-wide rubrics to communicate
    expectations
  • Establish expectations for courses by utilizing
    common course syllabi
  • Create common assessments for any course taught
    by multiple teachers
  • Review and consistently implement attendance,
    tardy and discipline policies

SDW
155
156
Key Practice Extra Help Provide a structured
system of extra help to enable students to meet
higher standards.
HSTW
SouthernRegionalEducationBoard
SDW
156
157
Extra Help is Important Because It
HSTW
  • Reduces failure rates
  • Reduces the ninth grade retention rate
  • Increases the high school graduation rate
  • Encourages students to stretch themselves

SDW
157
158
Extra Help
  • Why is it needed?
  • What is the number one key to success?
  • What are the different types?
  • How can we provide the extra help needed to make
    sure that all students reach high expectations?

159
Turn and Talk!
  • Turn to a shoulder partner and ask each other
    this question
  • What do you think is the number one factor
    impacting whether extra help programs are
    successful?

160
Getting Started With Extra Help
  • Offer help early
  • Frequent and regular
  • Easy to access sometimes required
  • Goal-setting important (school level, teacher
    level, student level)
  • Relationships over time
  • Volunteers and technology help
  • Avoid pull-out programs

161
Providing Extra Help
  • Tie to work students are doing as a normal part
    of the school routine
  • Supplement dont repeat
  • Use multiple strategies
  • Pick up the pace
  • Provided by trained person
  • Personalize

162
Types 
  • Peer Tutoring
  • On-line Tutoring and Computer-Assisted
    Instruction
  • After-School Programs (and Morning and Saturday
    Programs)
  • Mentoring
  • In-Class Programs
  • Summer School/intersession
  • Parent workshops

163
A Comprehensive Extra Help Program Must Include
HSTW
  1. Continuous extra help to meet standards and
    develop independent learners
  2. Ninth-grade transition
  3. High school, postsecondary and careers transitions

SDW
163
164
Effective Ongoing Extra Help
HSTW
  • Is available, without difficulty, from the
    teacher
  • Is available before, during or after school
  • Results in motivating students to try harder
  • Moves beyond homework help, study hall and simply
    re-telling information
  • Develops learning skills

SDW
164
165
Extra Help Successful Strategies
HSTW
  • Peer Tutoring
  • On-line Tutoring and Computer-Assisted
    Instruction
  • Support during the school day
  • Formative assessments with feedback
  • After School Programs (and Morning and Saturday
    Programs)
  • Credit Recovery Classes
  • Organized Student Study Teams
  • Clear expectations for participation

SDW
165
166
SDW
166
167
Redesigning the Ninth grade Experience
HSTW
  • Early Orientation
  • Summer Bridge
  • Ninth Grade Academy (Teacher Teams)
  • Catch-up Courses
  • Guidance/Advisement (Program of Study)
  • Career Exploratory (Career Course)
  • Grading Practices/Credit Recovery

SDW
167
168
Conditions for Effective Catch-up Courses
HSTW
  • Early identification of at-risk students
  • A lower student-teacher ratio in grade nine
  • Qualified teachers with depth of content
    knowledge teach challenging content
  • Standard-based Curriculum with unit planning by
    teachers
  • Move beyond remedial instruction School schedules
    modified to allow students to be double-dosed
    English/reading and mathematics
  • Comprehensive evaluation plan

SDW
168
169
Why target postsecondary transition?
HSTW
  • Senior year not taken seriously
  • Low ACT and SAT scores
  • High remedial rate in English and mathematics
  • Students unprepared for workforce
  • National completion rate for college only 39.9

SDW
169
170
Postsecondary Transition Four Components
HSTW
  1. For students meeting college readiness standards
    on state assessments - College credit while in
    high school.
  2. Students planning on further study who do not
    pass state assessments at college readiness level
    take transitional mathematics and/or English
    courses.
  3. Students who pass state assessments not planning
    to go on to further study complete a program
    leading to industry certification.
  4. Students who do not pass state assessments
    enrolled in double-dose courses and CT program.

SDW
170
171
Additional Actions for Making the Senior Year
Count
HSTW
  • Have community college administer placement exam
    during 11th grade
  • SAT/ACT Test for everyone in 11th grade
  • Reality check prior to the senior year with
    parents, adviser and counselor
  • Enroll seniors in default curriculum of
    upper-level courses
  • Enroll all seniors in at least three academic
    courses
  • Require a senior project that includes a research
    paper, a product or service, an oral presentation
    and a power point

SDW
171
172
Extra Help/Transitions Current Status p. 42-43
HSTW
  1. Best Practices
  2. Problem
  3. Possible Causes
  4. Potential Strategies

SDW
172
173
Key PracticeGuidance and Advisement Involve
students and parents in a guidance and advisement
system designed to develop positive relationships
and ensure that students complete an program of
study that includes the HSTW recommended core and
a concentration.
HSTW
SDW
173
174
Goals for a Good Guidance and Advisement Program
  • Connect every student to a goal beyond high
    school and give them a plan to reach that goal
    Program of Study
  • Connect every student to an adult in the school
  • Connect every parent/guardian in a meaningful way
    of supporting their child in achieving goals.

175
A Quality Guidance and Advisement Program
Includes
  • Assisting students in planning their high school
    program of study by the end of grade nine
  • Having teachers or counselors talk with students
    individually about plans for careers or further
    study
  • Helping students review their programs of study
    at least annually
  • Providing each student with an adult mentor
    throughout high school

SDW
175
176
A Quality Guidance and Advisement Program
Includes
  • Providing students with opportunities to speak
    with persons in careers to which they aspire
  • Providing information on college and
    postsecondary studies to all students and parents
  • Assisting students and parents with the
    postsecondary application process

SDW
176
177
Effective Guidance System and Higher Achievement
Source 2010 HSTW Assessment
177
178
Best Practices in Teacher Advisement Programs
  • Specified goals and outcomes
  • Leadership involvement
  • Thoughtful planning/conditions
  • Well-defined roles for the counseling staff
  • Well-defined role of the adviser
  • An effective curriculum
  • A portfolio for each student
  • Manageable advisory group size

178
179
Best Practices in Advisement Programs (continued)
  • Ongoing staff development for Advisers
  • Sufficient time to build relationships
  • Keeping the same adviser
  • Supports for rigor Students develop
    postsecondary goals and a plan to achieve those
    goals with the help of their parents and advisers
  • Annual meeting of students, parents and adviser
    to review the past year and plan for the upcoming
    year
  • An evaluation process and annual adjustments

180
System of Guidance and Advisement (pp. 44-45)
HSTW
  • Review your current status related to guidance
    and advisement and determine one outstanding
    practice in place.
  • Determine one action to ensure every student has
    a goal and a program of study by the end of 9th
    grade.
  • Determine one action to provide each student with
    an adult mentor throughout high school.
  • Determine one action to ensure students meet at
    least once a year with his/her parent or guardian
    and a school representative to review progress
    toward the program of study.

SDW
180
181
  • Now what?
  • Back to the Continuous Improvement Framework -
  • The Design Works when Implemented!

182
Back toStep 3 Set goals
  • What do you want to accomplish?
  • Set both performance and process outcomes
  • Performance outcomes student achievement,
    graduation rates, failure rates, etc.
  • Process outcomes changes in school and
    classroom practices
  • Be specific
  • Insufficient Increase math achievement
  • Good Increase the percentage of students
    passing the Algebra I EOC on the first attempt by
    10 each year
  • What will be measured to evaluate the results?

183
Measurable HSTW Goals
  • Students have the academic knowledge and skills
    needed to meet local, state and HSTW achievement
    goals.
  • Ninety (90) percent of students who enter ninth
    grade complete high school four years later.
  • All students leave high school demonstrating
    readiness for further study or careers by 1)
    earning post-secondary credit 2) passing college
    placement examinations or 3) earning employer
    certification or state licensure.
  • Eight-five (85) percent of graduates complete the
    HSTW recommended core curriculum and a
    concentration of four courses in an academic or
    career area.

183
184
What Does Your School Data Reveal?
  • Set bold Goals for 11 and 12
  • Are there specific domains that need attention
  • Can you move more students into Level 4 more
    closely aligned with college readiness
  • Add actions throughout the workshop to reach
    the goals.

185
Back to Step 4 Select strategies (SDW-
BrainstormFocus Teams Will Lead Effort)
  • What strategies are available?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages to
    each?
  • What are the obstacles and solutions? What
    resources are required?
  • What professional development is necessary to
    enable faculty and staff to implement the
    selected strategies effectively?
  • What would ideal implementation look like?
  • How will implementation be measured?

186
Step 4 Select strategies
  • Be specific about changes in
  • School structure, organization and instructional
    planning
  • School processes, teacher/classroom practices and
    student support
  • Support to be provided by school and district
    coaches to build school-level capacity
  • Support to be given by principal, including
    classroom observations
  • Role of school-based teacher facilitators

187
Step 4 Select strategies
  • Example Allstar High School
  • Strategies
  • Engaging instructional techniques project-based
    learning, real-world assignments, cooperative
    learning
  • Ninth-grade academy transition program, success
    as the only option policy, organize into teacher
    planning teams with a regular schedule, low
    student-to-teacher ratio
  • Early warning identification and intervention
    system develop student data system to track
    at-risk indicators, create intensive extra help
    program to get at-risk students back on track

188
Six-Step Process
189
Step 5 Take Action
  • Few problems are owned by only one or a few
    people. The school community must work together
    to solve its problems.

190
Step 5 Take action
  • Develop and implement the following three plans
  • Implementation plan Assign tasks and
    responsibilities who is responsible for what
    timeline
  • Data collection and evaluation plan what data
    will be collected to evaluate both implementation
    of strategies and progress toward meeting goal
    when will data be collected who will collect
    data
  • Professional development plan (next slide)

191
Step 5 Take action
  • Assign tasks and responsibilities
  • Who is responsible for what? Timeline?
  • Provide necessary professional development
  • Who will be responsible for initial and ongoing
    training coaching support planning with teacher
    teams
  • Implement selected strategies
  • Document implementation
  • Monthly review of progress
  • Monitor progress
  • Collect data for evaluation

192
Step 5
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