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Assessment Workshop Prairie View A

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Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: Carol S Last modified by: dekumar Created Date: 11/27/2006 11:26:57 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Assessment Workshop Prairie View A


1
Assessment Workshop Prairie View AM
University November 21, 2008
Celebrating 25 Years of Excellence in Teaching
and Learning - 1983-2008
http//assessment.tamu.edu
2
Outcomes for Todays Session
  • By the end of this session, participants will be
    able to
  • Describe the role of program assessment in SACS
    accreditation
  • Identify the steps of a program assessment plan
    and complete a plan given a sample program
    learning objective
  • Describe the benefits of course embedded
    assessment used for program assessment
  • Create part of a rubric that could be used in
    program assessment
  • Self-assess your own knowledge with regards to
    program assessment

3
Agenda
  • Introductions (5 min.)
  • Accreditation Overview (15 min.)
  • Writing Program Learning Objectives and the
    Program Assessment Cycle (15 min.)
  • Break (10 min.)
  • Course-embedded Assessment (30 min.)
  • Rubric Use and Development (40 min.)
  • Resources (10 min.)
  • Questions (15 min.)

4
Assessment Steps-- Where are You?
  • 1. Written Mission
  • 2. Developed program-level learning outcomes
  • 3. Determined measures
  • 4. Gathered results
  • 5. Used the results for program improvement

5
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6
Accreditation Within the framework of the
mission.
7
What does accreditation mean for faculty?
  • Assessment of student learning

8
SACS Standard Institutional Effectiveness
  • The institution identifies expected outcomes,
    assesses whether it achieves these outcomes, and
    provides evidence of improvement based on
    analysis of the results in each of the following
    areas

9
SACS StandardInstitutional Effectiveness
  • Educational programs, including student learning
    outcomes
  • Administrative support services
  • Educational support services
  • Research within its educational mission, if
    appropriate
  • Community/public service within its educational
    mission, if appropriate
  • Revisions to the Principles of Accreditation
    Foundations for Quality Enhancement, December 12,
    2006

10
Faculty
Administration
11
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12
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13
Program Assessment Cycle
Prior Knowledge?
Program Mission
PROGRAM LEARNING OBJECTIVES
INTERPRETATION Reflection/ Documentation Course
Portfolio
ALL ASSESSMENT Capstone Course project or
assignment Natl Normed Exam Eval of
Portfolio Internship Perf. Review Senior
Survey Alumni Survey
SELECTED ASSESSMENT Capstone Natl
Exam Portfolio Sr Survey
14
Form of Learning Outcomes
  • Learning Outcomes must
  • Contain a verb describing an observable or
    identifiable action
  • Focus on the student as the performer
  • What is the student expected to be able to know?
  • What is a student expected to be able to do?
  • How is a student expected to be able to think?

15
Activity
  • Choose one program learning objective for your
    area
  • What will the graduate know, be able to do and
    how will they think when they walk across the
    stage?
  • How will you know?
  • Share with a partner, improve with their feedback

16
Program Assessment Plan
  • Plan Development Steps
  • Specify the Program Learning Objectives
  • Identify related course(s)
  • Identify course embedded assessment techniques
  • Establish assessment criteria

17
From Program Learning Objectives to Course
Embedded Assessment
  • Specifying Program Learning Objectives
  • What will the graduate know, be able to do and
    how will they think when they walk across the
    stage?
  • How will you know?
  • Identifying Related Courses and Learning Outcomes
  • What courses reveal student mastery and summative
    assessment to address this program learning
    objective?
  • What must students do to prove that they have
    mastery?

18
Where will the Program Learning Outcomes be
Assessed?
Assess to determine achievement of program
learning outcomes
Student Teaching
Course 14
Capstone
Course 16
Senior
Course 9
Course 10
Internship
??????
Junior
Assess to determine where and how interventions
to improve program learning outcomes might be
accomplished
Course 5
Course 6
Course 7
Course 8
Sophomore
Course 1
Course 2
Course 3
Course 4
Freshman
19
Advantages of Course Embedded Assessment
  • Youre doing this already
  • Relationship to program learning objectives is
    obvious
  • Flexibility in assessment design and
    administrationFaculty ownership
  • No additional cost for instrumentation or
    assessment techniques
  • Efficient

20
Course Embedded Assessment Techniques
  • Questions embedded in final exams/tests
  • Common exams/tests questions across sections of a
    course
  • Use of rubrics, checklists, rating scales, etc.,
    to evaluate student performance in applicable
    knowledge/skills areas on essays, research
    papers, case study reports, oral presentations
  • Pre- post-tests

21
Program Assessment Plan Sample 1
  • The Department of Chemical Engineering, Texas AM
    University
  • Program Learning Objective An ability to use the
    techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools
    necessary for chemical engineering practice
  • Course Learning Outcome Use advanced chemical
    process simulation software to design integrated
    unit operations at the chemical plant scale.
  • Related Course CHEN 426 Plant Design
  • Assessment Measure As a course requirement,
    students write a final design report and produce
    an oral presentation. An industry panel evaluate
    students presentations using an evaluation
    rubric. One of the questions address students
    skill to use advanced chemical process simulation
    software to design integrated unit operations at
    the chemical plant scale.
  • Assessment Criteria At least 85 of students
    will be rated at 2 (meets expectations) and
    above on ability to use advanced chemical process
    simulation software to design integrated unit
    operations at the chemical plant scale.

22
Program Assessment Plan Sample 2
  • Program Learning Objective Students will
    recognize and apply Texas law.
  • Course Learning Outcome Students will define
    elements of crimes and penalties using Texas
    statutes as illustrations.
  • Related Course(s) CMJU 401
  • Assessment Measures Students will complete a
    final examination in which questions related to
    their understanding of the elements of crimes and
    penalties using Texas statutes have been
    embedded. Members of the program assessment
    committee will evaluate students answers to the
    embedded questions.
  • Assessment Criteria At least 70 of students
    completing the final examination will respond
    correctly to 80 or more of embedded questions.

23
Examples from the Participants
  • Brainstorm several course embedded techniques
    that address your program learning objective.

24
What is a rubric?
  • AKA Rating scale or grading template
  • A chart or list that states the criteria and/or
    characteristics upon which student work will be
    evaluated and
  • Defines and describes two or more levels of
    quality for each criteria.
  • A tool to measure attainment of selected program
    learning outcomes

25
Poor So-So Good
Criteria 1 Description of doing a poor job on Criteria 1 Description of doing a so-so job on Criteria 1 Description of doing a good job on Criteria 1
Criteria 2 Description of doing a poor job on Criteria 2 Description of doing a so-so job on Criteria 2 Description of doing a good job on Criteria 2
26
Why use a rubric?
  • As an evaluation tool for instructors
  • At the program level
  • Assists in making course outcomes and program
    learning objectives more explicit and transparent
  • Ensures consistency and fairness in analyzing
    program learning objectives through shared
    analysis
  • Saves time
  • Helps analyze program strengths and weaknesses.
  • At the course level
  • Helps define A work, B work, etc.
  • Increases level of trust between students and
    instructor
  • Saves time
  • Helps analyze student strengths and weaknesses.
  • Assists in making course outcomes and program
    learning objectives more explicit and transparent

27
Why use a rubric? cont.
  • As an instructional tool with students
  • Reveals the standards of the discipline/course/ass
    ignment
  • Can be used to involve students in setting
    standards and criteria for performance
  • To provide students with benchmarks for
    developing, judging, and revising their own work,
    thus developing their ability to self-monitor,
    self-direct and self-assess their own learning

28
Ex Rubric Article Review
Summary statement of article content Article summary is clear and concise, showing complete understanding of the content Summary is fairly thorough, though doesnt clearly show a full appreciation of the arguments Summary is confused or unclear, the student does not appear to understand the article The article is not summarized at all
Clear grasp of the argument The student clearly understands what the author was saying, and expresses this understanding well The student gets the gist of the paper, but doesnt fully understand the subtleties of the arguments The student misses a lot of important details, and doesnt seem to get the bigger picture The student clearly does not understand what the author was trying to say
29
How to create a rubric
  1. Identify characteristics you use in evaluating
    student work
  2. For each characteristic, describe what exemplary
    student work would look like, do the same for the
    lowest level
  3. Decide how many levels are appropriate or
    necessary for each characteristic
  4. Describe the remaining levels
  5. Assign a weight for each characteristic
  6. Check for reliability, e.g., practice with sample
    student work, ask a colleague to review/use the
    rubric with the samples, revise, revise, etc.

30

Activity Program Assessment Plan
  • Program Learning Objective Your program area
    example
  • Course Learning Outcome
  • Related Course(s)
  • Assessment Measures
  • Assessment Criteria

31
Take-Home Messages
  • You do not have to assess everything every year
  • Modify something already being done that is
    meaningful to the program
  • Be flexiblethis is an iterative process
  • This is a faculty-driven process (The outcomes
    you choose should be important to you.)

32
  • References
  • Palomba, C.A. and Banta, T.W. (1999). Assessment
    essentials Planning, implementing and improving
    assessment in Higher Education. San Francisco
    Jossey-Bass.
  • Huba, M.A. Freed, J.E. (2000). Learner-centered
    assessment on college campuses Shifting the
    focus from teaching to learning. Boston Allyn
    and Bacon. pp 151-200.
  • Andrade, H. G. (February, 2000). What do we mean
    by results? using rubrics to promote thinking
    and learning, Educational Leadership, 57(5),
    pp13-18.

33
What do we want every undergraduate to be able
to know and do when he or she graduates from
Texas AM University?
  •  
  • A TAMU graduate will
  • Master the depth of knowledge required of a
    discipline.
  • Demonstrate critical analytical skills.
  • Communicate effectively in writing and speaking.
  • Provide ethical leadership in a global and
    diverse society.

34
For more information on the conference and
registration, visit http//assessment.tamu.edu/con
ference
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