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Local Health District Response in a Community Disaster

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Local Health District Response in a Community Disaster Scott Pearce Manager Disaster Coordination and Response 1/9/11 * Identify location and types of Aged Care ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Local Health District Response in a Community Disaster


1
Local Health District Response in a Community
Disaster
  • Scott Pearce
  • Manager Disaster Coordination and Response
  • 1/9/11

2
Hunter New England Local Health District
  • Geographical area of over 130,000 square
    kilometers- the size of England
  • Provides care for approximately 840,000 people
  • Employs approximately 20,000 staff, and 2000
    volunteers
  • Provides health services to 12 per cent of the
    States population
  • Spends over 1.1 Billion per annum

3
Hunter New England Local Health District
4
Definitions NSW HEALTHPLAN
  • Disaster
  • An incident involving a significant number of
    casualties, which is beyond the capacity of
    available resources to manage (NSW Healthplan,
    2005).
  • Health Incident
  • A localised event, either accidental or
    deliberate, which may result in death or injury,
    which requires a normal response from one or more
    of the components of NSW Health. (NSW Healthplan,
    2008)
  • Health Emergency
  • An emergency due to an actual or imminent
    occurrence, which endangers or threatens to
    endanger the safety and health of persons in the
    state of NSW, and requires a significant and
    coordinated whole-of-health response. This
    particularly applies to human infectious disease
    emergencies from whatever cause. (NSW Healthplan,
    2008)

5
Health Arrangements
  • Health- Functional Area
  • Health Services Functional Area Coordinator
    (HSFAC)
  • HNE LHD Disaster Management Unit
  • Manager
  • Disaster Coordinators (part-time positions x2)
  • Biopreparedness Officer
  • State HSFAC and Health Emergency Management Unit

6
Disaster Arrangements
7

HNEH Disaster Management Roles Responsibilities
  • Planning
  • Disaster Education and Training
  • Exercise Management
  • Emergency Management Liaison
  • Resource Management


8
How can we assist you???
9
Health Emergency Management Liaison
  • Local Emergency Operations Centre
  • 27 Local Emergency Management Committees
  • District Emergency Operations Centre
  • 3 District Emergency Management Committees
  • Hunter Central Coast,
  • New England,
  • North Coast

10
Specialist Advice
  • Public Health
  • Environmental Health Officers
  • Infection Control
  • Infectious Diseases

11
Exercises
  • Emergency Operation/Incident Control Centre
  • Templates
  • e.g. evacuation
  • exercise

12
Having a robust disaster plan is essential.
Disaster Plans
13
Aged Care Facility Survey 2009/10
Number of Aged Care Facilities within HNE Area Health Service 129
Number of HNEH Sites with Aged Care Beds (District/Community Hospitals or MPS) 11
Total number of High Care Beds 3836
Total number of Low Care Beds 4701
TOTAL number of Aged Care Beds 8537
14
Results
Evacuation plans in place 96
NO evacuation plans in place within aged care facility 4
Pre-existing transport arrangements for evacuation 82
Short term (evacuation) relocation sites identified in facility plans 88
HNE Health Sites identified in evacuation plans as short term relocation site 18
Long term (evacuation) relocation sites identified in facility plans 30
HNE Health Sites identified in evacuation plans as Long term relocation site 4
15
Robust disaster plan- What should be in it
  • Notification process
  • to emergency services
  • to your LHD HSFAC
  • within your own service (in and out of business
    hours)
  • Definitions
  • Who is in charge (command and control roles/
    management structure/task cards)
  • Colour Codes (as per Australian Standards)
  • Staff training and exercises

16
What should be in your disaster plan?
  • Emergency Operations/Incident Control Centre
  • Communications/Phone Numbers listed
  • Business Continuity Plans (formally COSOPS)
  • Evacuation procedures (short and long
    term/transport/mutual aid agreements)
  • Special circumstances/arrangements (e.g. flood or
    fire prone area)
  • Documentation Forms (e.g. SITREP, Patient
    Evacuation, message, logs)

17
Case Study
  • Aged care provider learning's on responding to
    the February earthquake in Canterbury
    (Canterbury District Health Board, August 2011)

18
Incident
  • On September 4th 2010 a magnitude 7.1 earthquake
    struck at 4.35am centred 40km west of
    Christchurch. This earthquake caused significant
    damage to the surrounding areas including parts
    of Christchurch city and towns such as Kaiapoi.
  • Two aged care facilities had to be evacuated, one
    of which had to close.

19
Incident
  • Six months later on the 22nd February 2011 at
    12.51pm a magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck near
    Lyttleton 10km south-east of Christchurch. This
    earthquake caused significantly more damage to
    Christchurch particularly the CBD, eastern
    suburbs and the Port Hills.
  • 181 deaths
  • Seven aged care residential facilities were fully
    evacuated in Christchurch and two facilities were
    partially evacuated.
  • A number of offices of aged care providers (both
    home support and residential care providers) were
    also evacuated.
  • Canterbury lost over 600 aged care residential
    beds.
  • In 9 months since they have experienced over 7000
    aftershocks including one that was also 6.3 on
    June 13th.

20
  • The following questions were placed in the report
    to stimulate thinking about how prepared you are
    to respond to an emergency.

21
Emergency Plans
  • How accessible is your emergency contacts list?
    Does it list trades and suppliers under their
    function?
  • How well do you know your facility e.g. are your
    sewer pipes all on the same line, do you know
    where to turn off the water, gas and mains power?
  • Do you have mutual aid agreements with other
    facilities/organisations?

22
Emergency Supplies
  • Could you be self sufficient for a week?
  • What would your 5 day emergency menu look like?
  • If you have residents using oxygen how long would
    it last?
  • Do you have Emergency Kits? How many? Are they in
    the best place?

23
Communication
  • How will you access contact details of residents
    families, staff and suppliers if your computer is
    down and/or you cant access the building where
    hard copies are stored?
  • What are your contingency plans if your phones
    are down?
  • Both modern and old technologies are needed
    during a crisis. Can you operate both?

24
Water
  • When did you last practise accessing alternative
    water supplies at your facility or nearby e.g.
    water tanks, stocked water, wells, ponds and
    pools?
  • How would you boil large quantities of water with
    no electricity?

25
Toileting
  • What toileting methods would you use for
    residents and staff? Would they differ? Do you
    have adequate supplies?
  • How would you dispose of the volume of human
    waste?

26
Others Issues
  • Staffing- transport/welfare
  • Security- access to restricted areas through
    cordons, building security (swipe cards- no
    power)
  • Access to generators
  • Decision to evacuate

27
  • Questions
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