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Safe Routes to School

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Title: Education & Encouragement Programs Author: npullen Last modified by: Sean Boyce Created Date: 5/19/2004 3:49:12 PM Document presentation format – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Safe Routes to School


1
Safe Routes to School
  • Improving Health, Safety and Transportation

Madison, WI
2
The need for Safe Routes to School
  1. Fewer kids today walk and bike to school
  2. Unintended consequences have resulted
  3. SRTS programs are part of the solution

3
1. Fewer kids are biking and walking. More
parents are driving.
  • 2001 16 walked
  • 1969 42 walked
  • (CDC, 2005)

4
Parents driving
  • Parents driving children to school
  • 20-25 of morning traffic
  • (NHTSA 2003 Dept. of Environment)

5
What caused the shift?
6
School siting issues A generation ago
  • Small schools
  • Located in community centers
  • (EPA, 2003)

Madison, WI
7
School siting issues Today
  • Mega-schools
  • Built on edges of towns and cities

8
School consolidation has lengthened the trip
between home and school
9
Its not just distance
  • Students who live within 1 mile and walk or
    bike
  • 2001 63
  • 1969 87
  • (CDC, 2005)

Madison, WI
10
Most common barriers to walking and bicycling to
school
  • Long distances 62
  • Traffic speeds/volume 30
  • Adverse weather 19
  • Fear of crime/danger 12
  • Note Sum of percentages is more than 100
    because respondents could identify more than one
    barrier.
  • (CDC, 2005)

11
Traffic danger
Milwaukee, WI
Middleton, WI
12
Adverse weather
Howards Grove, WI
Centreville, VA
13
Individual community issues
  • Fear of crime (both real and perceived)
  • Abandoned buildings
  • Other reasons

14
2. The unintended consequences of less walking
and bicycling
  • On the environment
  • On individual health

15
1996 Summer Olympic Games banned single occupant
cars in downtown Atlanta
Atlanta, GA
16
Results of the ban
  • Morning traffic ä 23
  • Peak ozone ä 28
  • Asthma-related events for kids ä 42
  • (Journal of the American Medical Association
    JAMA, 2001)

17
Engine Idling
  • Reduces air quality
  • Idling an engine produces 2X exhaust emissions as
    an engine in motion
  • Increases air pollution around the school right
    at the time when children are present
  • 10 seconds of idling wastes more fuel than
    restarting the engine
  • Wastes money

Madison, WI
18
Air quality
  • Measurably better around schools with more
    walkers and bicyclists
  • (EPA, 2003)

Chicago, IL
19
Physical inactivity
  • Most kids arent getting the physical activity
    they need
  • Recommended 60 minutes on most, preferably all,
    days of the week
  • (US Depts. of Health and Human Services and
    Agriculture, 2005)

20
U.S. youth overweight rates
21
Overweight children have an increased risk of
  • Type 2 Diabetes
  • Low self esteem
  • Decreased physical functioning
  • Obesity in adulthood
  • Many other negative emotional physical effects
  • (Institute of Medicine, 2005)

22
Good news!
  • Communities are taking action on behalf of
    children through Safe Routes to School

Winston-Salem, NC
Alhambra, CA
Phoenix, AZ
23
3. Safe Routes to School programs are part of the
solution
  • ...to improve walking and bicycling conditions
  • ...to increase physical activity
  • ...to decrease air pollution

Dallas, TX
24
More benefits of SRTS programs
  • Reduce congestion around schools
  • Can lead to cost savings for schools(reduce need
    for hazard busing)
  • Others increase childs sense of freedom, help
    establish lifetime habits, teach pedestrian and
    bicyclist skills

25
Elements of SRTS programs
  • Education
  • Encouragement
  • Enforcement
  • Engineering
  • Evaluation

Madison, WI
26
Education
  • Imparts safety skills
  • Creates safety awareness
  • Fosters life-long safety habits
  • Includes parents, neighbors and other drivers

Chicago, IL
27
Encouragement
  • Increases popularity of walking and bicycling
  • Is an easy way to start SRTS programs
  • Emphasizes fun

Elmhurst, IL
28
Enforcement
  • Increases awareness of pedestrians and bicyclists
  • Improves driver behavior
  • Helps children follow traffic rules

Richmond, VA
Denver, CO
29
Engineering
  • Creates safer conditions for walking and
    bicycling
  • Can influence the way people behave

West Valley City, UT
30
Evaluation
  • Is the program making a difference?

31
Federal Safe Routes to School program
  • 612 million to States 2005-2009
  • Funds infrastructure and non-infrastructure
    activities
  • Requires State SRTS Coordinators
  • More information
  • www.saferoutesinfo.org

32
Wisconsins program
  • Renee CallawaySRTS Program ManagerWisconsin
    Department of TransportationPO Box 7913,
    Madison, WI 53707-7913Phone (608)
    266-3973Fax (608) 266-0658Email
    renee.callaway_at_dot.state.wi.us

33
Safe Routes to School goals
  • Where its safe, get children walking and biking
  • Where its not safe, make changes

Green Bay, WI
Winston-Salem, NC
34
Your Safe Routes to School Plan
  • Your Safe Routes to School Plan will contain the
    following chapters
  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction to SRTS
  • Present Conditions and Past Studies
  • Safety Issues and Routes
  • Study Recommendations
  • Developing a School Campaign

35
Timeline
  • 2007
  • September Meeting 1 data collection
  • September/October Walking and Biking Audits
    Distribute and Collect Surveys
  • October Continue Walk/Bike Audits Continue to
    Collect Surveys
  • November Surveys Compiled Meeting 2 Develop
    Alternatives
  • December Develop Alternatives

36
Timeline
  • 2008
  • January Develop Alternatives Meeting 3 Start
    to Assemble Draft Plan
  • February Assemble Draft Plans
  • March Meeting 4 Finalize Document
  • April Finalize Documents Delivery

Safe Routes to School Practice and Promise (2004)
37
SRTS Audit
  • Purpose
  • To assess the conditions of a ½ mile radius
    around each school as they relate to biking and
    walking
  • Will help determine the recommendations in the
    plan
  • Can be used to apply for infrastructure grants in
    2008
  • Grant requirement
  • Volunteers needed!

38
SRTS Audit Team
  • Jack Hirt
  • Executive Director of Bicycle Federation of WI
  • Involved in Safe Routes to School planning and
    implementation since 2004
  • Abilities include classroom instruction of
    bicycle and pedestrian safety, and facility
    design and planning for specific school sites
  • Year-round bike and walk commuter

39
SRTS Audit Team
  • Jessica Wineberg
  • She currently bikes to work everyday at the
    Bicycle Federation of WI
  • She runs the largest Safe Routes to School
    program in the state with the Milwaukee Public
    Schools
  • She is a League Cycling Instructor

40
SRTS Audit Team
  • Charley Weeth
  • Executive Director of Wisconsin Walks
  • Years of experience with pedestrian safety and
    access issues
  • Avid walker and bicyclist, routinely out and
    about with his German Shepherds

41
Success!
  • The success of the plan depends on you
  • Talk to your neighbors and friends
  • Participate in the School Campaign
  • Call your local papers
  • Envision success!

Madison WI
42
www.saferoutesinfo.org
Websites
http//www.dot.wisconsin.gov/localgov/aid/saferout
es.htm
  • Additional Information from the Wisconsin DOT
    includesApplicationsToolkitSurveysContactsLi
    nks to additional information

43
Websites
http//www.saa-madison.com
  • Additional Information from Schreiber/Anderson
    Associates includesIntroductory
    PacketSurveysContactsProject progress
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