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STATE OF TEXAS ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM) READING Grades 3

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STATE OF TEXAS ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM) READING Grades 3 8 English I, II, and III Victoria Young Director of Reading, Writing, and – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: STATE OF TEXAS ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM) READING Grades 3


1
STATE OF TEXAS
ASSESSMENTS OF ACADEMIC READINESS (STAARTM)
READINGGrades 38English I, II, and III
  • Victoria Young
  • Director of Reading, Writing, and
  • Social Studies Assessments
  • Texas Education Agency

2
STAAR Reading Performance Spring 2012 Statewide
ResultsPhase-in and Recommended Standards
Grade/Course Phase-in Standard Recommended Standard
Grade 3 76 39
Grade 4 77 42
Grade 5 77 40
Grade 6 75 38
Grade 7 76 39
Grade 8 80 43
English I 68 46
3
The Big PictureWhat Students Have to Know How To
Do
  • Think critically/inferentially about different
    types of texts (in essence, know how to do more
    than literally read the lines know how to read
    between the lines and beyond the lines)
  • Make connectionsat differing levels of depth and
    complexityboth within and across texts
  • Understand what makes a connection between texts
    thematic or meaningful (and what doesnt)
  • Understand and be able to apply the specific
    academic vocabulary associated with literary and
    informational reading

4
The Big PictureWhat Students Have to Know How To
Do
  • Understand that the way an author crafts a piece
    drives the way the reader reads it. Know that
    authors use different tools to craft different
    types of pieces (e.g., genres). Be able to
    identify these tools and pinpoint/articulate how
    they affect meaning.
  • Understand the difference between effective text
    evidence and flawed text evidence. Know how to
    stay inside the text to find evidence that
    truly confirms the validity of an idea. Know how
    to find and use text evidence for different
    genres of reading.

5
STAAR Short Answer Reading Performance Labels
Based on the Rubric
  • Score Point 0INSUFFICIENT
  • Score Point 1PARTIALLY SUFFICIENT
  • Score Point 2SUFFICIENT
  • Score Point 3EXEMPLARY
  • The goal moving all students from the lower half
    of the score-scale range (0 or 1) to the upper
    half of the range (2 or 3)

6
What Short Answer Questions Require(and why
they are essential to reading development at all
levels)
  • To become good readers, students must understand
    what constitutes a credible IDEA in response to a
    question about a text or texts.
  • An IDEA represents the quality and depth of
    thinking and understanding
  • IDEA in a score of 3 on STAAR perceptive,
    coherent, discerning, clearly analytical
  • IDEA in a score of 2 on STAAR reasonable and
    specific goes beyond literal reading (even if
    its only slightly beyond)

7
What Short Answer Questions Require(and why
they are essential to reading development at all
levels)
  • IDEA in a score of 1 on STAAR lacks explanation
    or specificity represents only a literal reading
    of the text
  • IDEA in a score of 0 on STAAR doesnt answer the
    question incorrect or invalid reading of the
    text too general, vague, or unclear to judge
    whether it is reasonable

8
What Short Answer Questions Require(and why they
are essential to reading development at all
levels)
  • To become good readers, students must by able to
    use TEXT EVIDENCE to prove that their ideas are
    valid/credible.
  • TEXT EVIDENCE substantiates the readers ideas
    it reflects the degree to which the reader can
    connect his or her own ideas with the pieces of
    the text that best support the analysis.

9
What Short Answer Questions Require(and why they
are essential to reading development at all
levels)
  • TEXT EVIDENCE in a score of 3 on STAAR specific
    and well chosen
  • TEXT EVIDENCE in a score of 2 on STAAR accurate
    and relevant
  • TEXT EVIDENCE in a score of 1 on STAAR only a
    general reference, too partial, weakly linked, or
    wrongly manipulates the meaning of the text
  • TEXT EVIDENCE in a score of 0 either missing or
    not attached to an idea

10
Why We Have to Include Text Complexity in the
Conversation
  • If we want students to do on-grade-level work, we
    must teach them how to tackle increasingly
    complex texts each year. Text complexity is
    driven by a variety of factors
  • The authors vocabulary/use of language may be
    more varied and challenging because it is
    nonliteral/figurative, abstract, academic, or
    technical
  • Sentence structures may be more varied, dense,
    and sophisticated

11
Why We Have to Include Text Complexity in the
Conversation
  • The authors use of literary elements/devices,
    rhetorical strategies, organizational patterns,
    and text features may be more nuanced or
    sophisticated
  • The topic/content may be less familiar or more
    cognitively demanding
  • Relationships among ideas may be less explicit
    and require more interpretation, reasoning, and
    inferential thinking to understand the subtlety,
    nuances, and depth of ideas

12
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • Why does the author use a particular genre (e.g.,
    literary nonfiction vs. expository, expository
    vs. persuasive)?
  • Why does the author include a particular
    paragraph or paragraphs?
  • Why does the author begin or end a piece in a
    particular way?
  • Why does the author include a description of XX?

13
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • How do a characters relationships with other
    characters or motivations to take certain actions
    affect the plot/conflict/ outcome of a story?
  • How does the author use dialogue to develop a
    particular character or the relationship between
    characters?
  • How does the point of view from which the story
    is told affect the readers understanding of
    characters and events?

14
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • What is the effect of setting on events/
    characters/outcome of a story?
  • How does a poet, playwright, or author use
    imagery, simile, metaphor, hyperbole,
    personification, time disruptions (flashback,
    foreshadowing) to create meaning?
  • Why is XX ironic? How is XX symbolic?
  • Which sentence best indicates, suggests,
    establishes, illustrates, describes, explains,
    expresses, supports, reflects, reveals, shows
    (shows at lower grades only)?

15
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • What is significant (important) about XX?
  • How does the author organize the selection? Why
    does the author organize the information in a
    particular way?
  • Why does the author include a particular section
    (under a subheading) of an expository piece?
  • What is the authors attitude toward his/her
    subject? (attitude tone)

16
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • How does the authors use of particular words or
    phrases create a particular tone? How does the
    use of particular words affect meaning?
  • Why does the author include quotations from
    particular people/entities/publications?
  • Why does the author use particular rhetorical
    strategiese.g., italics, ellipses, questions,
    comparisons/analogies, repetition, exaggeration?

17
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • How does the author support each of his/her
    arguments?
  • What is the authors most convincing reason (and
    why)?
  • Does the author make a convincing case for his
    position/opinion?

18
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • Media/Procedural
  • What is the tone of the photograph?
  • What can the reader infer from the photograph and
    its caption? (At lower grades The photograph
    helps the reader know XX.)
  • Why does the author include the boxed
    information?
  • Why does the author include a map? What can the
    reader conclude from the map?
  • How does the embedded media or procedural element
    add to the readers understanding of the piece
    (or a section of the piece)?

19
What Students Have to Know for STAAR ReadingSome
Specifics
  • Connecting Selections
  • What is one similarity or difference between the
    two selections or between the narrators/
    speakers/characters/authors in the two
    selections?
  • What is a theme or idea explored in both
    selections? Is the central message of the two
    selections the same?
  • How does a particular quotation from one
    selection link/correspond thematically to a
    quotation from the other selection?

20
The Link between Reading and Analytical Writing
  • The analytical writing task is an interpretive
    essay about one aspect of a literary or
    informational text (fiction, literary nonfiction,
    expository, or persuasive) that is approximately
    375450 words in length.
  • The analytical essay requires students to
    demonstrate the skills required in expository and
    persuasive writing as well as those required on
    short answer reading questions.
  • The writers thesis statement must be a
    reasonable (though contestable) assertion about
    one aspect of a text that can be supported with
    textual evidence.

21
The Link between Reading and Analytical Writing
  • Ineffective approaches confuse
  • analysis and summary
  • general text references and specific text
    evidence
  • Students must integrate their analysis and their
    text evidence so that their essay is coherent.
    (This will also help their short answer reading
    responsesand their reading and writing
    performance in the lower grades.)
  • Analytical essays are scored on the quality of
    the interpretation, the strength of the text
    evidence, and the overall effectiveness of the
    essay.

22
CONTACT INFORMATION
  • Victoria Young
  • Director of Reading, Writing, and Social
    Studies Assessments
  • Texas Education Agency
  • 512-463-9536
  • victoria.young_at_tea.state.tx.us
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