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Effective Classroom Practice Activity Sequence

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Title: Classroom System Essential Feature Activity Sequence & Offering Choice Author: College of Education Last modified by: ahwolfe Created Date – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Effective Classroom Practice Activity Sequence


1
Effective Classroom Practice Activity Sequence
Offering Choice
  • MO SW-PBS

Center for PBS College of Education University of
Missouri
2
CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL POSITIVE
BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
Tier 3 Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems for Students with
High-Risk Behavior
Tier 2 Secondary Prevention Specialized
Group Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior
Goal Reduce intensity and severity of chronic
problem behavior and/or academic failure
Goal Reduce current cases of problem behavior
and/or academic failure
Tier 1 Primary Prevention School-/Classroom-Wi
de Systems for All Students, Staff, Settings
Goal Reduce new cases of problem behavior
and/or academic failure
3
Social Competence Academic Achievement
SW Positive Behavior Support
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
Supporting Staff Behavior
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Supporting Student Behavior
4
Effective Classroom Practices
  • Classroom
  • Expectations Rules
  • Procedures Routines
  • Continuum of strategies to acknowledge
    appropriate behaviors
  • Continuum of strategies to respond to
    inappropriate behavior
  • Active supervision
  • Multiple opportunities to respond
  • Activity sequence Offering choice
  • Academic success Task difficulty

5
Newcomer, 2008
6
Newcomer, 2008
7
Activity Sequence
  • Task Interspersal
  • Behavioral Momentum

8
What is Activity Sequencing?
  • Thinking about and altering the manner in which
    instructional tasks, activities or requests are
    ordered in such a way that promotes learning and
    encourages appropriate behavior.
  • (Kern Clemens, 2007)

9
Why Consider Activity Sequence?
  • Increases task performance
  • Decreases disruptive behavior
  • Improves student perception of and preference for
    assignments they consider difficult
  • (Kern Clemens, 2007)

10
Why Consider Activity Sequence?
  • For some students presenting difficult tasks
    back-to-back often sets the occasion for
    frustration, failure and problem behavior.
    Varying the sequence of tasks may not be
    necessary for average students, but can be very
    important for students who are at-risk for
    learning or behavior concerns
  • (Darch Kameenui, 2004).

11
Strategies for Effective Activity Sequencing
  • Intermingle easy/brief problems among longer or
    more difficult tasks (task interspersal)
  • (Kern Clemens, 2007)

12
Research for Activity Sequencing Task Interspersal
  • Interspersing difficult tasks with easier
    problems
  • Cates and Skinner (2000) examined assignment
    perception among remedial math students in
  • grades 9-12.
  • Students perceived the interspersed assignments
    as
  • taking less time to complete,
  • being less difficult and
  • requiring less effort

13
Strategies for Effective Activity Sequencing
  • Deliver 3 to 4 simple requests prior to a
    difficult assignment (behavioral momentum)
  • (Kern Clemens, 2007)

14
Research for Activity Sequencing Behavioral
Momentum
  • Deliver simple requests before a more
  • difficult task
  • Improved behavior among 2nd graders during
    transition times when teacher provided a series
    of simple requests prior to the transition
    directions (Ardoin, Martens Wolfe, 1999).
  • Increased writing performance among 10-11 year
    olds when teacher asked them to write 3 simple
    words each time they stopped writing (Lee
    Laspe, 2003).

15
Activity Sequencing Examples
  • With a partner read two student examples
  • (Use Activity Sequencing Examples Handout)
  • Next, identify the activity sequencing strategy
    used in each example
  • task interspersal or
  • behavioral momentum

16
Using Sequence in Your Classroom
List several of the activities students complete in your classroom. Identify ways you could use sequencing in each activity Intermingle easy/brief among more difficult tasks Provide simple requests prior to more difficult tasks
1.
2.
3.
4.
17
Offering Choice
  • Type, Order, Materials,
  • Whom, Place Time

18
Why Provide Choice?
  • Providing opportunities for students to make
    choices has been demonstrated to be an effective
    intervention in preventing problem behavior and
    increasing engagement
  • (Kern and Clemens, 2007, p. 70)

19
Why Provide Choice?
  • Feasible and easy intervention to implement
  • Effective for students in general or special
    education
  • Does not require significant modification to
    existing instruction
  • (Kern and State, 2009)

20
Why Provide Choice?
  • Teach students to become self-determined
    individuals
  • Enables them to better control their environment
  • Can lead to more predictable student-teacher
    interactions
  • Allows opportunity for more frequent positive
    attention and feedback from teachers
  • May foster improvements in student teacher
    relationships
  • (Jolivette, Wehby, Canale Massey, 2001 Kern
    and State, 2009, p. 10)
  • (Kern and State, 2009, p. 3)

21
Strategies for Offering Choice
  • Examples of classwide choice
  • Type of task or activity
  • Order or sequence of tasks
  • Kinds of materials that will be used
  • Whom to work with
  • Place to work
  • Choice of how to use time

22
Offering Choice Example
  • With a partner read the example.
    (Use Offering Choice Example Handout)
  • Next, identify the types of choices offered to
    students in the example.
  • Be prepared to share your answers with the large
    group.

23
Steps for Using Choice in the Classroom
  • Create a menu of choices you would be willing to
    provide to students.
  • Look through your choice menu before planning
    each lesson.
  • Decide what types of choice are appropriate for
    the lesson and where they fit best in the lesson.
  • Provide choices as planned while teaching the
    lesson.
  • Solicit student feedback and input.
  • (Kern and State, 2009, p. 5)

24
Create a Menu of Choice Options
Type of tasks
Order of tasks
Kinds of materials
Whom to work with
Place to work
Choice of how to use time
25
What Options Did You Think Of?
Type of tasks
Order of tasks
Kinds of materials
Whom to work with
Place to work
Choice of how to use time
26
Offering Choice
  • Remember . . .
  • Every lesson does not have to include all of the
    choices on your list, but if each lesson you
    teach provides at least one opportunity for
    choice, students are likely to benefit.

27
Effective Classroom Practice
  • Activity Sequence
  • task interspersal
  • behavioral momentum
  • Offering Choice
  • type, order, materials
  • who, place and choice of time

28
References
  • Colvin, G. (2009). Managing noncompliance and
    defiance in the classroom A road map for
    teachers, specialists, and behavior support
    teams. Thousand Oaks, CA Corwin Press.
  • Darch, C. B. Kameenui, E. J. (2004).
    Instructional classroom management A proactive
    approach to behavior management. Upper Saddle
    River, NJ Pearson.
  • Jolivette, K., Wehby, J. H., Canale, J.,
    Massey, N. G. (2001). Effects of choice-making
    opportunities on the behavior of students with
    emotional and behavioral disorders. Behavioral
    Disorders, 26, 131-145.
  • Kern, L. and Clemens, N.H. (2007). Antecedent
    strategies to promote appropriate classroom
    behavior. Psychology in the Schools, 44(1),
    65-75.
  • Kern, L. and State, T. M. (2009). Incorporating
    choice and preferred activities into classwide
    instruction. Beyond Behavior, 18(2), 3-11.

29
References
  • Morgan, P. L. (2006). Increasing task engagement
    using preference or choice-making Some
    behavioral and methodological factors affecting
    their efficacy as classroom interventions.
    Remedial and Special Education, 27, 176-187.
  • Powell, S. Nelson, B. (1997). Effects of
    choosing academic assignments on a student with
    attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
    Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30,
    181-183.
  • Scheuermann, B. K. and Hall, J. A. (2008).
    Positive behavioral supports for the classroom.
    Upper Saddle River, NJ Pearson Merrill Prentice
    Hall.
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