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EASD Gifted Presentation

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Title: EASD Gifted Presentation Author: Nanda Mitra Last modified by: Nanda Itle Created Date: 7/11/2005 3:49:28 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: EASD Gifted Presentation


1
EASD Gifted Presentation
  • Presented by
  • Mrs. Nanda Mitra Itle

2
Essential Questions
  • What is a gifted student?
  • How gifted students identified?
  • What is the purpose of gifted education?
  • What will my childs educational program look it?
  • What are my rights as a parent?
  • What can I do to help as a parent?
  • What are some resources out there?

3
What is a Gifted Student?
4
What is a Gifted Student?
  • Mentally and physically involved instead of just
    attentive (Szabos).
  • Constructs abstractions instead of just
    understanding ideas (Szabos).
  • Answers in detail instead of just answering
    question (Szabos).
  • Plays around yet tests well instead of working
    hard to test well (Szabos).
  • Consequently, gifted education is needed and
    provided in conformity with a Gifted
    Individualized Education Program (GIEP).

5
What is a Gifted Student cont?
  • A child with an ability that requires specially
    designed programs and/or support services not
    ordinarily provided in the regular education
    program (22 Pa. Code16.1)
  • A child with an IQ of 130 or higher when multiple
    criteria as set forth in department guidelines
    indicates gifted ability (22 Pa. Code16.21d)

6
Multiple Criteria?Criteria, other than IQ score,
must be used to indicate gifted abilitySuch As.
  • Academic performance significantly above grade
    level or the normal age group in one or more
    subjects as measured by nationally normed and
    validated achievement tests.
  • (22 Pa. Code16.1)

7
Multiple Criteria cont..
  • Rate of Acquisition/Retention
  • Demonstrated Achievement, performance or
    expertise in one or more academic areas.
  • Early and measured use of high level thinking
    skills, academic creativity, leadership skills,
    intense academic interest areas, communication
    skills, foreign language aptitude or technology
    expertise.
  • (22 Pa. Code16.1)

8
Multiple Criteria cont..
  • Intervening factors masking giftedness such as
    ESL, SLD, physical impairment, emotional
    disability, gender, race bias, or socio/cultural
    deprivation.
  • (22 Pa. Code16.1)

9
Multiple Criteria continued..
  • Rate of Acquisition/Retention
  • Demonstrated Achievement, performance or
    expertise in one or more academic areas.
  • Early and measured use of high level thinking
    skills, academic creativity, leadership skills,
    intense academic interest areas, communication
    skills, foreign language aptitude or technology
    expertise.
  • (22 Pa. Code16.1)

10
Multiple Criteria continued..
  • Intervening factors masking giftedness such as
    ESL, SLD, physical impairment, emotional
    disability, gender, race bias, or socio/cultural
    deprivation.
  • (22 Pa. Code16.1)

11
How are gifted students identified?
12
Gifted Stats.
  • A gifted student falls within the end of a
    standard bell curve.
  • The gifted population across the nation
    constitutes the top 2.
  • Image from www..librarythinkquest.org

13
Stats 101
  • Scale Score-Raw (range 1-19)
  • Basal Rule-Certain number of consecutive correct
    before going on (usually 2-3)
  • Ceiling Rule-Certain number of consecutive
    incorrect before discontinuing (ranging from 3-7)
  • Standard Score- score with a mean of 100 and
    standard deviation of plus/minus 15.
  • Confidence Interval-obtained score plus/minus
    certain range creating a band of confidence (90
    or 95).
  • (Bordens Abbot)

14
Stats 101 cont
  • Base rate-tells how often a difference occurs in
    a standardized group. What the norm is.
  • Subtest scatter- If 6pts or more in range.
  • IQ score scatter-If have scatter in subtests can
    make FSIQ, index score not as valid. See norms
    for statistical significance of IQ scatter.
  • Critical Value-Used to determine the probability
    of making a Type I (alpha) or II (Beta) error.
    Usually .05 or .01 is used.
  • (Bordens Abbot)

15
Stats 101 cont
  • Intra-individual differences-Pattern of strengths
    and weakness compared to own aptitude.
  • Inter-individual difference-Pattern of strengths
    and weakness compared to same age/grade peers
    (percentile rank).
  • Norm group-making comparisons against other kids
    in norm group. Assessments should have a wide
    group for which they were standardized on to have
    good validity.
  • (Bordens Abbot)

16
Types of Intelligence
  • G general intelligence with specific abilities.
  • Fluid-adaptive, capacity to learn, novel problem
    solving ability
  • Crystallized-acquire skills/knowledge that are
    based on experience and culture.
  • Verbal-
  • Nonverbal (spatial)-
  • Short-term memory-
  • Processing speed-

17
Assessments Used
  • Cognitive Assessments (A.K.A. I.Q. Tests)
  • Achievement Assessments
  • District Assessments
  • State Assessments
  • Parent, Teacher, Student input

18
Cognitive Assessments
  • WISC-IV (Wescler Individual Scale for Children,
    Fourth Edition)
  • Reynolds
  • Woodcock Johnson III
  • K-BIT
  • TONI
  • Standford Binet

19
Achievement Assessments
  • WIAT II (Weschler Individual Achievement Test,
    Second Edition)
  • Woodcock Johnson III
  • KTEA
  • WRAT

20
District Assessments
  • Most districts have reading and math assessments
    (ie. 4-Sight, DIBELS, CBA, etc).
  • Assessments generally have a low ceiling (grade
    level only)
  • Designed to measure acquisition of grade level
    material
  • Sometimes used for instructional purposes (I.e.
    ability groups, etc).

21
State Assessments
  • Are on grade level content only
  • Have a low ceiling
  • Sometimes determines class placement (secondary
    mostly)
  • Gifted kids often have difficulty sequencing in
    math areas.
  • Accommodations allowed (I.e. extended time, etc)

22
Parents, teacher, Student input
  • Important to consider multiple perspectives
  • Important to involve students in their own
    education
  • Important for teachers and parents to work
    together.

23
So what does all that mean?
  • Make sure that IQ score being used is a good
    measure of the students cognitive ability
    (minimal scatter, good norms, meet ceiling and
    basal rules, takes into account gifted
    characteristic, etc).
  • Make sure intra-individual as well as
    inter-individual differences are reported.
  • Make sure achievement measures being used have a
    high ceiling.
  • Make sure multiple criteria are considered,
    especially for students whose IQ score is lower
    than 130.

24
So what cont
  • Make sure cognitive assessment being used is
    appropriate for your child (I.e. nonverbal for
    ESL or speech and language impaired).
  • Make sure instruction being delivered is at the
    students level given assessment data.
  • Make sure appropriate push-in and/or pull-out
    interventions are being used.
  • Make sure inter or intra-individual differences
    reported are at .05 or .01 alpha ratios.

25
What is the Purpose of Gifted Education?
26
Role of Gifted Education in Schools
  • To identify the specific talents and abilities of
    gifted students and nourish those abilities
    through placing students in appropriate K-12
    district curricula.
  • To provide an appropriate education based upon
    the specific abilities of each student.
  • To challenge gifted students by providing
    educational programming that meets their academic
    and intellectual needs within the scope of the
    K-12 district curriculum.
  • (Thomas, A Grimes, T, 1995).

27
What will my Childs Gifted Educational Program
look like?
28
Levels of Service in Programming
  • Services offered to all Students
  • Services offered to many students
  • Services offered to individuals or small groups
    by specialists in school.
  • Outside services or unusual in-school options
    offered to individual students
  • Ron Schmiedel

29
Individualized Gifted Program
facilitator support
Independent Study
Pull-out
School clubs/teams
Tiered Assignments
Acceleration
Enrichment
Clubs
Grouping
School in a School
Middle school classes
Testing out
Differentiation
Gifted Center
Specialized Curriculum
Learning contracts
Grade skipping
Distance Learning
Ron Schmiedel
30
Gifted Education components
Acceleration
Acceleration
Enrichment
Affective Needs
Enrichment
Affective Needs
Global/Social connections
  • Through a variety of service delivery options!
  • Ron Schmiedel

31
Gifted Education is
  • Conducted in an instructional setting.
  • Provided in an instructional or skill area.
  • Individualized to meet the educational needs of
    the student within the scope of the K-12 district
    curriculum.
  • Reasonably calculated to yield meaningful
    educational benefit and student progress.
  • Provided in conformity with a Gifted.
    Individualized Education Program (GIEP).
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

32
What is a GIEP?
  • Based on unique needs to the gifted student, not
    just on the students classification.
  • Enables the student to participate in
    acceleration or enrichment or both as
    appropriate.
  • Enables the student to receive services according
    to their intellectual and academic abilities and
    needs within the scope of the K-12 district
    curriculum.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

33
GIEP Content?
  • Statement of your childs present educational
    performance.
  • Annual goals will describe what your child can be
    expected to learn during the year.
  • Short-term outcomes are the sequential steps your
    child must take in order to reach these goals.
  • Dates for the beginning and end of the GIEP.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

34
GIEP Content cont..
  • Ways for determining whether the goals and
    learning outcomes are being met.
  • Names and positions of the GIEP participants.
  • Date of meeting.
  • List any support services that are needed.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

35
GIEP Time lines
  • GIEP must be completed within 30 calendar days
    after the written report.
  • The GIEP must be put into action no more than 10
    school calendar days after the GIEP is completed.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

36
GIEP Time lines cont..
  • After the GIEP is developed, you will receive a
    Notice of Recommended Assignment (NORA) and a
    copy of Notice of Parental Rights for Gifted
    Children.
  • The district may send these through the mail
    within 5 calendar days after the conclusion of
    the GIEP meeting.
  • The district may also give these forms to you in
    person at the end of the GIEP meeting.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

37
GIEP Time lines cont..
  • If the NORA was mailed to you, you have 10
    calendar days to return it.
  • If the NORA was given to you at the GIEP meeting,
    you have 5 calendar days to return it.
  • If you gave your approval and signed the NORA at
    the GIEP meeting, you have 5 days to revoke the
    approval.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

38
Other Educational Changes?
  • General educational curriculum will be
    adapted/modified as needed.
  • Modifications may consistent of compacting,
    acceleration, dual placement in subject at or
    grade level and/or enrichment all within the
    scope of the K-12 district curriculum.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

39
What are my rights as a parent?
40
Parental Rights?
  • (For a complete list see the Notice of Parental
    Rights for Gifted Children booklet.)
  • Right to see and get copies of your childs
    public school records within 45 days of asking
    for them or before any meeting regarding the GIEP
    or before a due process hearing.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

.
41
Parental Rights cont..
  • You have the right to be notified about your
    childs program and progress and any changes that
    take place in either.
  • The right to approve or reject programs and
    testing.
  • The right to privacy
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

42
Parental Rights cont.
  • The right to have a mediation to help you and the
    school reach an agreement.
  • The right to an impartial due process hearing
    with a hearing officer.
  • (PDE-Parent Guide to Special Education for the
    Gifted)

43
What can I do to Help as a Parent?
44
What can I do to help?
  • Share insights regarding your child with school
    staff (strengths, talents, creative abilities
    etc).
  • Bring ideas to the GIEP meeting
  • Review the GIEP with the child before/after the
    meeting.
  • Talk with child about what being gifted means and
    obtain their insights.

45
What can I do to help?
  • Clarify expectations-yours and the teachers (ways
    of acting, academic goals etc).
  • Volunteer to help classroom and school wide
    gifted activities.
  • Keep school updated on your child (I.e.
    interests, family situations, educational
    activities outside of school,special experiences
    etc).

46
What are some Resources out there?
47
Resources
  • http//www.glc.k12.ga.us/qcc/homepg.asp
  • http//www.cloudnet.com/7Eedrbsass/edres.htm
  • http//www.nswagtc.org.au/info/links.html
  • http//www.easdpa.org/district/professional/lesson
    plan.htm

48
Resources, cont.
http//www.hoagiesgifted.org/investigations.htm
http//www.glc.k12.ga.us/trc/cluster.asp?modebrow
seintPathID7686
http//webquest.sdsu.edu/webquest.html (click
Portal, then select Top in left column
  • http//curry.edschool.virginia.edu/hottlinx/
  • http//www.shambles.net/pages/staff/gifted/

49
Resources, contd
  • http//www.bestwebquests.com
  • http//edsitement.neh.fed.us/tab_lesson.asp?subjec
    tArea2
  • http//www.intel.com/ca/education/unitplans/
  • http//www97.intel.com/en/ProjectDesign/UnitPlanIn
    dex/GradeIndex/4
  • http//www97.intel.com/en/ProjectDesign/UnitPlanIn
    dex/SubjectIndex/SubjectIndex.
  • http//www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/6097/mat
    h.html (this won't work from school computers,
    but it is good)

50
Resources, cont.
  • http//www.ed.gov/databases/ERIC_Digests/ed342175.
    html
  • Article by Dr. Carol Ann Tomlinson describing the
    characteristics of a differentiated classroom
    with an emphasis on the learning needs of
    academically advanced learners.
  • Article by Sandra Berger describing instructional
    and management strategies for the modification of
    curriculum based on the needs and characteristics
    of gifted students. Explores models and
    strategies for modify content process, product
    and learning environment.

51
Resources cont..
  • http//teach-nology.com/
  • School Psychologist
  • Gifted facilitators
  • Guidance Counselors
  • Principals
  • Websites and books

52
References
  • Bordens, K.S. Abott, B.B. Research design and
    methods. A process approach 3rd. Mayfield Pub.
    Co.
  • Schmiedel, R. from Pine-Richland High School
  • Szabos, J 1989. Challenge. Good Apple 34.
  • Thomas, A Grimes, T, 1995. Gifted education.
    Best Practices in School Psychology III.
    1083-1086.
  • EASD gifted manual and handouts
  • Pennsylvania Department of Education website

53
Questions?
54
Good Bye Thanks for everyone's help and patience
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