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Welcome to the National Common Core State Standards Overview Sangamon County Regional Office of Education

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Welcome to the National Common Core State Standards Overview Sangamon County Regional Office of Education April 13, 2011 Presented by Lori Loving & Terrie Armstrong – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Welcome to the National Common Core State Standards Overview Sangamon County Regional Office of Education


1
Welcome to the National Common Core State
Standards Overview Sangamon County Regional
Office of Education
April 13, 2011 Presented by Lori Loving Terrie
Armstrong Two Rivers Professional Development
Center/Peoria County Regional Office of Education
2
Use your candy bar to predict the future!
  • If you chose
  • Please share
  • What will be FUNNY about teaching in 2014?
  • What are your DREAMS for teaching in 2014?
  • Who will be your teaching compatriots in 2014?
  • What will you need to have in your BAG of TRICKS
    to teach in 2014?
  • Snickers
  • Milky Way
  • Three Musketeers
  • Twix

3
  • http//www. Lexile.com
  • "The college instructor blames the high school
    teacher, the high school teacher complains of the
    grade teacher, each grade teacher above first
    grade finds fault with the poor work of the
    teacher in the grade below, and the first grade
    teacher in turn is chagrined at the shortcomings
    of the home training. Must this go on
    indefinitely? Whose opinion shall prevail? Is it
    not possible to get away from personal opinion to
    an agreed-upon consensus of opinion? May we not
    replace the constantly conflicting subjective
    standards with definitely defined objective
    standards?"
  • Wilson Hoke, 1921

4
Illinois Learning Standards letter grade of
D
  • Too vague
  • Too outdated
  • Too many
  • Illinois hasnt met a standard it didnt like.
  • -Dr. Willard Daggett

5
ISBE NCCSS Video
6
  • COUNCIL OF CHIEF STATE SCHOOL OFFICERS (CCSSO)
  • NATIONAL GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION
  • CENTER FOR BEST PRACTICES
  • (NGA CENTER)

7
  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
  • AND
  • Mathematics
  • Science (coming, but not yet released)

8
  • STANDARDS FOR
  • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
  • LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES,
  • SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS
  • JUNE 2010

9
Standards Development Process
  • College and career readiness standards developed
    in summer 2009
  • Based on the college and career readiness
    standards, K-12 learning progressions developed
  • Multiple rounds of feedback from states,
    teachers, researchers, higher education, and the
    general public
  • Final Common Core State Standards released on
    June 2, 2010

10
44 States DC Have Adopted the Common Core State
Standards
  • Maine and Washington have adopted the CCSS
    provisionally Minnesota adopted the CCSS in
    ELA only

11
What are the Common Core State Standards?
  • Aligned with college and work expectations
  • Focused and coherent
  • Include rigorous content and application of
    knowledge through high-order skills
  • Build upon strengths and lessons of current state
    standards
  • Internationally benchmarked so that all students
    are prepared to succeed in our global economy and
    society
  • Based on evidence and research
  • State led coordinated by NGA Center and CCSSO

12
Why is this important?
  • Currently, every state has its own set of
    academic standards, meaning public education
    students in each state are learning to different
    levels
  • All students must be prepared to compete with not
    only their American peers in the next state, but
    with students from around the world

13
Inflection Point
  • The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) can become
    an inflection point for American public
    education - establishing a common foundation for
    building excellence and equity for all students.


14
How will the NCSS be Assessed?PARCC States
Governing Board States
Participating States
15
Key features in PARCC
Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for
College and Careers
Highlights from the PARCC Summary
  • http//www.achieve.org/PARCCsummary

16
States will adopt common assessments and
performance standards.
17
Assessment system will be anchored in college and
career readiness.
18
Students will take parts of the assessment at
key times during the year.
Through-course assessments
19
Assessments will be computer based.K-2
Performance Based3-5 Paper Pencil6-12
Electronic
20
Assessments will include sophisticated items and
performance tasks.
21
To develop assessments that dont simply measure
whether students can fill in a bubble on a test,
but whether they possess 21st century skills like
problem-solving and critical thinking and
entrepreneurship and creativity.
Goal of Next Generation Assessments
22
Beyond the Bubble Tests The Next Generation of
Assessments
  • Http//www.ed.gov/news/speeches/
  • I am convinced that this new generation of state
    assessments will be an absolute game-changer in
    public education.
  • ---Education Secretary Arne Duncan
  • September 2, 2010

23
Intended Outcomes of PARCC Assessments
  • Report achievement based on clear expectations
    ability to compare across state lines
  • Use results in school accountability
    determinations and educator evaluations
  • Integrate assessment system with standards,
    curriculum, resources, and professional work
  • Rapid use of data to guide instruction

24
Timeline Next Steps for PARCC Assessments
25
Timeline Next Steps
The PARCC plan includes an ambitious timeline to
develop and deploy new common assessments. PARCC
states will see increasing levels of activity
between now and the fall of 2014 when new
assessments are fully launched
  • October 2010 Design phase begins
  • September 2011 Development phase begins
  • September 2012 Field testing and research and
    data collection begin
  • School year 2014-15 Assessments administered
    in all PARCC states
  • Summer 2015 Achievement levels, or
    proficiency thresholds, are set

26
Challenges Ahead for PARCC
27
Key Technical Challenges for PARCC
  • There are a number of technical/technological
    challenges that PARCC is currently facing
    including
  • Developing an interoperable technology platform
    that meets the needs of all PARCC states
  • Transitioning states to an computer-based
    assessment system
  • Will provide state and district needs assessment
  • Will support state and district transition
    planning
  • Developing and implementing Artificial
    Intelligence (AI) scoring systems and processes
  • Identifying innovative item types that are
    effective measures

28
Key Implementation Challengesfor PARCC
  • Developing and implementing next generation, K-12
    assessment system in just four years will be a
    major challenge for state leaders, district and
    school leaders, and educators alike. Challenges
    include
  • Estimating administrative costs over time,
    including long-term budgetary planning
  • How can states use existing sources of funding to
    support implementation of the new assessment
    system?
  • Transitioning to the new assessments, including
    through-course components, and what the impact
    will be at the classroom level
  • Providing tools, resources and supports to
    districts and schools to ease this transition
  • Ensuring long-term sustainability

29
Key Policy Challenges for PARCC
  • The implementation of CCSS and PARCC will not
    happen in a vacuum and require states to address
    a number of related policies, such as
  • High school course requirements
  • What courses need to be required to ensure there
    is alignment with the Common Core and high school
    PARCC assessments?
  • In what courses should the assessments be given
    in high school?
  • Accountability
  • How will states accountability systems need to
    evolve to take into account PARCC assessments?
  • Student supports and interventions
  • How/when will supports and interventions be
    triggered for students not meeting
    proficiency/readiness scores on the
    PARCC assessments?

30
Conclusion
  • The promise of standards
  • These Standards are not intended to be new
    names for old ways of doing business. They are a
    call to take the next step. It is time for states
    to work together to build on lessons learned from
    two decades of standards based reforms. It is
    time to recognize that standards are not just
    promises to our children, but promises we intend
    to keep.

31
Initial Efforts Underway for IL implementation of
the NCCSS
  • A comparison of the new standards to the old
    standards (Gap Analysis on www.isbe.net)
  • Assessment Frameworks
  • Discussions regarding accountability issues are
    taking place
  • Development of an interim plan is a high priority

32
TRANSITION TO NEW ILLINOIS LEARNING STANDARDS
Adoption Communication Information Awareness
Present End of 2011 School Year
Design of Implementation System
Communication Information
Resource Development Technical Assistance
Summer 2011 End of 2012 School Year
Transition Implementation Technical Assistance
Summer 2012/Fall 2013/Spring Summer 2014
Fall 2014 2015 Spring New Assessment
33
What might Phase I look like at the local level?
Phase I Information Communication
sharing information planning discussion familiar
ity with new standards input from teachers
regarding local implementation informing local
leaders and boards anticipated needs and support
Adoption Communication Awareness
34
Professional Development
  • Local and Regional Alignment Institutes (June
    2011)
  • Webinars
  • Self-paced online professional development

35
ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS
36
What are College and Career Literacy Readiness
Skills?
  • They demonstrate independence.
  • They build strong content knowledge.
  • They respond to varying demands of audience,
  • task, purpose discipline.
  • They comprehend as well as critique.
  • They value evidence.
  • They use technology and digital media
  • strategically and capably.
  • They come to understand other perspectives and
  • cultures.

37
Layout
Strand
Anchor Standard
Standard
38
Design and Organization
  • Three main sections
  • K-5 (cross-disciplinary)
  • 6-12 English Language Arts
  • 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies,
  • Science, and Technical Subjects
  • Shared responsibility for students literacy
    development
  • Three appendices
  • A Research and evidence glossary of key terms
  • B Reading text exemplars sample performance
    tasks
  • C Annotated student writing samples

39
Design and Organization
  • Four strands
  • Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills)
  • Writing
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Language
  • An integrated model of literacy
  • Media requirements blended throughout

40
Design and Organization
  • College and Career Readiness (CCR)
  • anchor standards
  • Broad expectations consistent across grades
    and content areas
  • Based on evidence
  • about college and
  • workforce training
  • expectations
  • Range and content

41
Design and Organization
  • K-12 standards
  • Grade-specific end-of-year expectations
  • Developmentally appropriate, cumulative
    progression of skills and understandings
  • One-to-one correspondence with CCR standards

42
Key Advances
  • Reading
  • Balance of literature and informational texts
  • Text complexity
  • Writing
  • Emphasis on argument and informative/explanatory
    writing
  • Writing about sources
  • Speaking and Listening
  • Inclusion of formal and informal talk
  • Language
  • Stress on general academic and domain-specific
    vocabulary

43
Key Advances
  • Grades 6-12 Standards for reading and writing in
    history/social studies, science, and technical
    subjects (p. 61-66)
  • Complement rather than replace content standards
  • in those subjects
  • Responsibility of teachers in those subjects
  • Alignment with college and career readiness
  • expectations

44
Intentional Design Limitations
  • What the Standards do NOT define
  • How teachers should teach
  • All that can or should be taught
  • The nature of advanced work beyond the core
  • The interventions needed for students well below
    grade level
  • The full range of support for English Language
    Learners and students with special needs
  • Everything needed to be college and career ready

45
English Language Arts PARCC Assessment Example
Example 1 Delineate and evaluate the argument
that Thomas Paine makes in Common Sense. Assess
the reasoning present in his analysis, including
the premises and purposes of his essay. CCSS
11-12.RI.8 Example 2 Analyze how Abraham
Lincoln in his Second Inaugural Address
examines the ideas that led to the Civil War,
paying particular attention to the order in which
the points are made, how Lincoln introduces and
develops his points, and the connections that are
drawn among them. CCSS 9-10.RI.3 and 9-10.RI.9

http//web.me.com/acaciatc/UACC/PARCC_Resources.ht
ml
46
Which literacy readiness skills were showcased?
  • They Demonstrate independence
  • They Build strong content knowledge
  • They Respond to the varying demands of audience,
    task, purpose, and discipline.
  • They Comprehend as well as critique.
  • They Value evidence
  • They Use technology and digital media
    strategically and capably.

47
Treasure Hunt
48
  • STANDARDS FOR
  • MATHEMATICS
  • JUNE 2010

49
Design and Organization, K-8
  • Standards for Mathematical Practice
  • Carry across all grade levels, K-8
  • Describe habits of mind of a mathematically
    expert student
  • Standards for Mathematical Content
  • K-8 standards presented by grade level
  • Organized into domains that progress over several
    grades
  • Grade introductions give 24 focal points at each
    grade level
  • High school standards presented by conceptual
    theme (Number Quantity, Algebra, Functions,
    Modeling, Geometry, Statistics Probability)

50
Where to Start with Math
  • Eight Standards of Mathematical Practice
  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving
    them.
  • Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
  • Construct viable arguments and critique the
    reasoning of others.
  • Model with mathematics.
  • Use appropriate tools strategically.
  • Attend to precision.
  • Look for and make use of structure.
  • Look for and express regularity in repeated
    reasoning.

51
Design and Organization
  • Content standards define what students should
    understand and be able to do
  • Clusters are groups of related standards
  • Domains are larger groups that progress across
    grades

p. 24
Standard
52
Design and Organization
Grade Level Overviews
p. 10
53
Design and Organization
Grade Level Overviews
p. 11
54
High School Changes
  • Conceptual themes in high school, not grade level
    overviews
  • Number and Quantity
  • Algebra
  • Functions
  • Modeling
  • Geometry
  • Statistics and Probability
  • College and career readiness threshold
  • () standards indicate material beyond the
    threshold can be in courses required for all
    students.

55
Treasure Hunt
56
Before we define Practice
  • Heres a man who knows the word, practice.
  • Source www.youtube.com

ltiframe title"YouTube video player" width"480"
height"390" src"http//www.youtube.com/embed/bHJ
DRgVwcP8" frameborder"0" allowfullscreengtlt/iframe
gt
57
Lets check the glossary!
1. Repeated performance or systematic exercise
for the purpose of acquiring skill or
proficiency Practice makes perfect. 2.
Condition arrived at by experience or exercise
She refused to play the piano, because she was
out of practice.
Whats the definition?
practice  (prkts) v. practiced, practicing,
practices
58
Levels
Blooms
C D A B
6
5
4
3
2
1 2 3 4 5
1
Application
59
Unpacking the Practices
Step Two Make a Poster
  • Reread the practice standard.
  • Poster Directions
  • Write the Mathematical Practice at the top.
  • Which Blooms Level is represented most with the
    verbs? (samples)
  • What would this practice look like in a
    classroom?
  • Teachers would be.
  • Students would be.
  • (Provide examples to explain)

Activity
  • Step One
  • Individually read the practice standard.
  • Highlight the verbs in each standard.
  • What do you notice about the verbs used?
  • (Refer to Blooms Taxonomy handout)

60
  • Discussion
  • How will this knowledge of the 8 Mathematical
    Practices
  • help in your role in the classroom?
  • impact your instruction?
  • help inform your professional development needs?

61
Directions Use the index cards at your tables
to construct 2 facts and 1 myths about Common
Core (one on each card) No answers just the
statements. Stand for Fact Sit for Myth
Closer Fact or Myth?
62
  • This presentation was adapted from materials and
    webinar recordings available at
  • www.corestandards.org
  • www.isbe.net
  • www.fldoe.org/parcc/
  • www.achieve.org/PARCC
  • www.tworiverspdc.net
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