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INTEREST GROUPS AND CAMPAIGN FINANCE

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INTEREST GROUPS AND CAMPAIGN ... laws Keeps records of contributions and ... by the FEC and not subject to the same contribution limits as ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: INTEREST GROUPS AND CAMPAIGN FINANCE


1
INTEREST GROUPS AND CAMPAIGN FINANCE
2
Interest Groups
  • A group of people who share common goals and
    organize to influence government.
  • Usually concerned with only a few issues or
    specific problems.
  • Interest groups allow citizens to communicate
    their wants or policy goals to government
    officials.

3
Types of Interest Groups
ACLU
4
Business Related Interest Groups
  • National Association of Manufacturers
  • U. S. Chamber of Commerce
  • Business Roundtable

5
Labor Related Interest Groups
  • AFL-CIO-
  • International Brotherhood of Teamsters
  • United Auto Workers
  • United Mine Workers

6
Agricultural Interest Groups
  • American Farm Bureau Federation-
  • National Farmers Union-

7
Professional Associations
  • American Bar Association
  • American Medical Association
  • National Education Association

8
Environmental Interest Groups
  • Sierra Club
  • National Wildlife Federation

9
Lobbyists
  • Interest Groups hire people to represent their
    interests with Congress
  • Their effort to influence officials is called
    lobbying.

10
Lobbying
  • Attempts by organizations or individuals to
    influence the passage, defeat, or content of
    legislation and the administrative decisions of
    government.
  • -Occurs at all levels in all branches of
    government
  • -Lobbyists are usually former members of
    Congress, former bureaucrats, experts in their
    field

11
Methods of Lobbying
  • 1. Personal contact with key legislators
  • 2. Provide expertise to legislators or other
    government officials
  • 3. Offer expert testimony before
  • Congressional committees for or
  • against proposed legislation

12
Methods continued
  • 4. Assist legislators or bureaucrats in
  • drafting legislation
  • 5. Follow up with executive and judicial
  • departments on execution and
  • enforcement of policy

13
Regulation of Lobbyists
  • 1. Must register with the Clerk of the House and
    the Secretary of the Senate
  • 2. Must give quarterly reports on activities
    which are published in Congressional Quarterly

14
How do Interest Groups Affect Campaigns?
15
Campaigns
  • Before the 1970s, candidates could raise and
    spend money with few restrictions
  • 1974 - the first comprehensive campaign finance
    act was passed, created the Federal Election
    Commission (FEC)

16
Federal Election Commission (FEC)
  • Administers federal election laws
  • Keeps records of contributions and expenditures
    (disclosure)
  • Keeps records for all federal candidates,
    political parties, and PACs
  • Responsible for election oversight

17
What is a Political Action Committee (PAC)?
  • A political committee organized for the purpose
    of raising and spending money to elect and defeat
    candidates
  • Most interest groups form PACs and contribute
    large sums of money to ALL candidates

18
How much can you contribute?
  • Individuals
  • To candidates - 2,100 in primary
  • 2,100 in general election (total 40,000 per two
    year cycle)
  • In-kind gifts up to 2,100
  • 61,400 to PACs National Parties (2yr)
  • 10,000 to state parties
  • 101,400 total per 2 year cycle

19
Who Else Can Contribute?
  • 1. Multi-candidate committee/PAC
    (those with 50 contributors, registered 6
    months, contribute to 5 federal candidates)
  • 5,000 to any candidate/committee
  • 15,000 to national party committee
  • 5,000 to any PAC/ No limit on total
  • Political Action Committees
  • 2,100 to any candidate/committee
  • 26,700 to national party committee
  • 5,000 to any other PAC/ No limit on total

20
Soft Money
  • Money given to political parties for party
    building activities
  • Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act 2002 (BCRA) It has
    been outlawed because
  • 1. led to out of control spending
  • 2. little oversight and regulation
  • 3. disproportionate spending among
  • parties

21
527 GROUPS
  • A tax exempt organization created to influence
    the nomination, election, appointment or defeat
    of candidates for public office
  • Not regulated by the FEC and not subject to the
    same contribution limits as PACs

22
527s - Continued
  • Can accept contributions in any amount from any
    source
  • Many are run by special interest groups to raise
    and use money how they wish
  • A new form of soft money?
  • Exp. Swift Boat Veterans for Truth
  • Move On.org

23
Illegal Contributions Ø  No cash over 100 Ø 
Foreign nationals cannot contribute Ø  Direct
funds cannot be given by labor unions or
corporations Ø  Government contractors cannot
contribute
24
TOP TEN ALL-TIME DONOR PROFILES
Rank Organization Name Total Contributions 1989-2006
1 American Fedn of State, County Municipal Employees 37,075,652
2 ATT Inc. 35,937,756 Split
3 National Association of Realtors 28,211,023 Split
4 Assn of Trial Lawyers of America 25,686,556
5 National Education Association 25,417,891
6 Intl Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 24,160,419
7 Service Employees International Union 23,522,473
8 Laborers Union 23,255,307
9 Communications Workers of America 23,218,569
10 Teamsters Union 23,209,533
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