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CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS CONFERENCE 2007

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Title: ROYAL ROADS UNIVERSITY MASTER OF ARTS IN LEADERSHIP AND TRAINING PROGRAM Author: Elizabeth M Davis Last modified by: Elizabeth Davis Created Date – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS CONFERENCE 2007


1
CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
CONFERENCE 2007
  • OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
  • IN THE 21ST CENTURY
  • KNOWING THE WAY
  • SHOWING THE WAY
  • July 11, 2007

2
  • The rules break like a thermometer
  • Quicksilver spills across charted systems.
  • Were out in a country that has no language,
  • no laws,
  • Chasing the raven and the wren
  • through gorges unexplored since dawn.
  • Whatever we do together is pure invention.
  • The maps they gave us were out of date
  • by years.
  • Adrienne Rich, Twenty-one Love Poems

3
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4
  • How can we dare Wisdom in the mosaic of our
    realities?
  • Inès Maria dell Eucaristia

5
OVERVIEW OF REFLECTIONS
  • Setting the Context
  • Mosaic of our Realities
  • Expectations of Canadians
  • Occupational Therapists as Leaders
  • Readiness for and Response to Trust Given You

6
CHANGES IN WESTERN SOCIETY
  • Demographic shifts
  • Increasing urbanization
  • Increasing cultural diversity
  • Impact of computerization
  • Culture of consumerism
  • Increasing gap between rich and poor
  • Role of women
  • Realities of violence and poverty
  • Understanding of health of environment
  • Expectations of public service
  • Credibility of leaders

7
CHANGING UNDERSTANDING OF HEALTH
  • Health is a state of complete physical,
    emotional, social and spiritual well-being it is
    a resource for everyday living.
  • Examples of Implications
  • Value of ones own experiences
  • Social, psychological and spiritual factors
  • Gender as health determinant
  • Health of person, family, community, population
    and earth

8
CHANGING HEALTH PROFESSIONS
  • Advances in science and technology
  • Growing educational opportunities
  • Changes in law re scope of practice and
    responsibilities
  • Loss of control over working conditions
  • Expansion of guidelines, expectations and
    recommendations from professional associations
  • Focus on evidence-informed practice
  • Shift from profession-centred to patient-centred
    culture

9
CHANGING HEALTH PROFESSIONS
  • Blurring professional boundaries
  • Increased expectations of inter-professional
    collaboration in education and practice
  • Increasing demands for accountability and
    transparency
  • Internationalization
  • Move from traditional inward-looking, reactive
    culture to outward-looking, proactive culture

10
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11
CONCERNS OF PEOPLE
  • Staying healthy Will I be able to stay as
    healthy as possible-through education, health
    promotion, preventive services, and early
    detection of disease?
  • The basics Will I have access to needed services
    and will I be treated respectfully and understand
    what is said to me?
  • Getting better If I get sick, will I get better
    and regain normal functioning?
  • Living with illness If I suffer from a chronic
    condition will I be able to maintain the best
    possible functioning?
  • Changing needs As I face death or disability in
    my family, will we be able to cope?


  • Lansky, 1998

12
VULNERABLE POPULATIONS
  • Aboriginal people poor health status, poverty,
    violence, substance abuse, lower life expectancy
  • Lone parents poverty, financial stress, food
    insecurity, violence and emotional abuse
  • Rural women higher mortality rates
  • Incarcerated persons exposure to HIV/AIDS,
    antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis, hepatitis C,
    sexually transmitted diseases
  • Young women most vulnerable to health risks
    smoking, alcohol abuse, anorexia, violence and
    emotional abuse, depression, AIDS/HIV
  • Womens Health Surveillance Report
  • (CPHI CIHI, 2003)

13
CHILDREN AT RISK
  • Aboriginal children
  • Children with disabilities
  • Children living in remote communities
  • Children of single parent families
  • Children in the welfare system
  • Children of recent immigrants and
  • Refugee children

14
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15
WHAT DO WE CITIZENS EXPECT?
  • Rights People have a right to health and health
    care
  • Balance Care of individual patients is central,
    but the health of populations is also our concern
  • Comprehensiveness In addition to treating
    illness, we have an obligation to ease suffering,
    minimize disability, prevent disease, and promote
    health
  • Cooperation Health care succeeds only if we
    cooperate with those we serve, each other, and
    those in other sectors
  • Improvement Improving health care is a serious
    and continuing responsibility
  • Safety Do no harm
  • Openness Being open, honest, and trustworthy is
    vital in health care

  • Tavistock Principles (2001)

16
ROLES OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS AS LEADERS
  • Visionary musician, artist
  • Catalyst prophet, disturber of the peace
  • Partner one who reaches out, finds gifts in
    others, appreciates diversity 
  • Decision-maker one who makes the decision even
    if difficult

17
ROLES OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS AS LEADERS
  • Inspirer spirit creator, calling forth the good
  • Facilitator one who draws forth the energy,
    hopes, action of the group 
  • Implementer doer of the often difficult deeds
  • Evaluator not just the one who measures but one
    who celebrates wins, learns from losses

18
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS AS THERAPISTS
  • Manage diversity within your profession
  • Respond within changing social realities
  • Be inclusive
  • Understand globalization and health care reform
  • Reintroduce values of flexibility, discovery and
    innovation
  • Tell stories
  • Create environments allowing creativity,
    questions, risk

19
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS AS RESEARCHERS
  • Research
  • Interdisciplinary and collaborative
  • qualitative and quantitative
  • investigative and evaluative
  • Input and participation of therapists at every
    stage of research process
  • Link with wider national and international
    professional community
  • Research agenda gender-sensitive and inclusive
  • Recognition of diverse communities of therapists
  • Increased number of OT researchers
  • Means of transforming research results into
    health policy and practice

20
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS AS VISIONARIES
  • Stretch into new ways of thinking
  • Leave behind what is no longer appropriate
  • Interconnect practice, education, administration,
    and research
  • Value your networks
  • Re-inspire your spirit

21
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22
ELEMENTS OF RESPONSE
  • Vision
  • Values
  • Relationships
  • Value of Tradition
  • Celebration

23
VISION
  • Had, held, shared, grown
  • Something significant left to do
  • Vision Community

24
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY VISION
  • Occupational therapy is a health profession
    concerned with promoting health and quality of
    life through occupation. The primary goal of
    occupational therapy is to enable people to
    participate in the activities of everyday life.
    Occupational therapists work collaboratively with
    people of all ages and abilities who experience
    challenges or obstacles to participation. These
    obstacles may be caused from an impairment of
    body structure, a change in function, or from
    barriers in the social and physical environment.

25
VALUES
  • Values are sets of freely chosen convictions
    which compel action as they are cherished and
    publicly affirmed.
  • Charles McCoy

26
Occupational therapists believe
  • About occupation,
  • occupation gives meaning to life
  • occupation is an important determinant of health
    and wellbeing
  • occupation organizes behaviour
  • occupation develops and changes over a lifetime
  • occupation shapes and is shaped by environments
  • occupation has therapeutic effectiveness

27
Occupational therapists believe
  • About the person,
  • humans are occupational beings
  • every person is unique
  • every person has intrinsic dignity and worth
  • every person can make choices about life
  • every person has some capacity for
    self-determination
  • every person has some ability to participate in
    occupations
  • every person has some potential to change
  • persons are social and spiritual beings
  • persons have diverse abilities for participating
    in occupations
  • persons shape and are shaped by environment

28
Occupational therapists believe
  • About the environment,
  • environment is a broad term including cultural,
    institutional, physical and social components
  • performance, organization, choice and
    satisfaction in occupations are determined by the
    relationship between persons and their
    environment
  • About health,
  • health is more than the absence of disease
  • health is strongly influenced by having choice
    and control in everyday occupations
  • health has personal dimensions associated with
    spiritual meaning and life satisfaction in
    occupations and social dimensions associated with
    fairness and equal opportunity in occupations

29
Occupational therapists believe
  • About client-centred practice,
  • clients have experience and knowledge about their
    occupations
  • clients are active partners in the occupational
    therapy process
  • risk-taking is necessary for positive change
  • client-centred practice in occupational therapy
    focuses on enabling occupation

30
RELATIONSHIPS
  • Wholeness
  • Inclusion
  • Interconnectedness
  • Interdependence
  • Enculturation
  • Appreciation of diversity

31
  • Im sittin on my stage-head lookin out at where
    Skipper Joe Irwins schooner is ridin at her
    moorin thinkin about how weak are the things
    that try to pull people apart differences in
    colours, creeds and opinion weak things like
    the ripples tuggin at the schooners chain. And
    thinkin about how strong are the things that
    hold people together strong, like Joes anchor,
    and chain, and the good holdin ground below.
  • Ted Russell, The Holdin Ground

32
RESPECTING THE TRADITION
  • Image of the dory
  • Strengths of the past

33
READINESS TO RESPOND
  • Awareness of complexity
  • Skills development
  • Strengths of tradition
  • Emotional preparedness
  • Reflection
  • Ceremonies and celebration
  • Symbols
  • Confidence/conviction

34
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35
Beannacht ("Blessing")
  • May the light of your souls guide you. May the
    light of your souls
  • bless the work that you do with the secret love
    and warmth of your hearts. May you see in what
    you do
  • the beauty of your own souls. May the sacredness
    of your work
  • bring healing, light and renewal
  • to those who work with you and to those who see
    and receive your work. May your work never weary
    you. May it release within you wellsprings of
    refreshment, inspiration and excitement.

36
  • May you be present in what you do. May you never
    become lost in bland absences. May the day never
    burden. May dawn find you awake and alert,
    approaching your new day with dreams,
    possibilities and promises. May evening find you
    gracious and fulfilled. May you go into the
    night
  • blessed, sheltered and protected. May your souls
    calm, console and renew you.
  • Adapted from
  • John
    O'Donoghue, Anam Cara
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