Madison Metropolitan School District - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Madison Metropolitan School District PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 51c213-MjYwN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Madison Metropolitan School District

Description:

Madison Metropolitan School District Gang Prevention Program Deb Ptak, Principal, Sennett M.S. Luis Yudice, MMSD Safety/Security Coordinator Questions? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:155
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 67
Provided by: b7222
Learn more at: http://sspw.dpi.wi.gov
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Madison Metropolitan School District


1
Madison Metropolitan School District
  • Gang Prevention Program
  • Deb Ptak, Principal, Sennett M.S.
  • Luis Yudice, MMSD Safety/Security Coordinator

2
Training Objectives
  • Provide an overview of MMSDs efforts to reduce
    gang activity in schools.
  • To share data on gang involved youth in our
    community.
  • To discuss characteristics of gang involved youth
    and gang identifiers.
  • To discuss MMSDs program.
  • To provide resources/links.

3
Policy Statement
  • MMSD is committed to ensuring the academic
    achievement of all students by providing an
    orderly, safe and secure learning environment.
  • MMSD will implement the following measures to
    prevent gang activity and to support students and
    families who may be gang involved.

4
Whats a Gang?
  • Three or more people who form an allegiance for a
    common purpose and engage in delinquent or
    criminal activity.
  • Generally use symbols and group identifiers.
  • Gangs are White, Latino, African-American, Asian.

5
Gangs in Dane County
  • 2007 Enhanced Gang Task Force report
  • Diverse group of community members corrections,
    schools, faith communities, UW Madison, United
    Way, business, law enforcement, Madison, Sun
    Prairie, Stoughton, Oregon.

6
Key Findings
  • Gangs have been in Madison for decades.
  • Gangs have a growing presence in our schools and
    have impacted the communitys perception of
    safety.
  • Police incidents, gang activity in the summer of
    2007, State Street crimes, Oregon shooting in
    2005, MMSD gang activity in 2007.

7
Juvenile Crime and Referrals
  • Increased crimes of aggression.
  • Group fights, weapons.
  • Youth self-identify to police and corrections as
    gang involved.
  • Increase in Latino gang involvement and family
    concerns.
  • Graffiti and indicators of violence and conflict.

8
Youth Violence
  • Youth violence is considered a national public
    health problem according to the US Surgeon
    General, National Institute of Health, the Center
    for Disease Control, the American Academy of
    Family Physicians, USDHHS Substance Abuse and
    Mental Health Services Administration, and others.

9
Gangs in Dane County
  • Folks-GDs, Money Before Bitches, Smash on Sight
    Guys, Deuces, Black T-Shirt Boys.
  • People-Vice Lords, P-Stones, Yung Assassins, ,
    Latin Kings, Money Over Bitches
  • Surenos-Southside Locos, Clantones, Goof Troop
    (girls).
  • Nortenos-Chicano Pride Association, MS, Ojos
    Rojos, Latin Saints.

10
Gangs
  • West Coast-Little Boy Crips, Outlaw Bloods,
    Cambodian Bloods, Khmer Pride.
  • Girl Gangs-Block Burner, Smash on Sight Girls,
    Goon Squad.
  • White Supremacists-National Socialist Movement
    and White Revolution
  • Motorcycle-Outlaws and Hells Angels

11
Gang Involvement of Youth Sent to Corrections
  • Among males has increased steadily 28 in 2004
    and 49 in 2005.
  • Female gang participation remained steady in
    2002-04.
  • Female referrals have decreased, but crimes of
    aggression have increased in school and in the
    community.

12
United Way-Disconnected Youth Data
  • There are approximately 72,000 school-aged
    children and youth living in Dane County.
  • Of these, there are at least 4,000 who are not
    part of a strong educational, cultural, and
    economic infrastructure in our community.
  • At least 500 will not graduate with their peers.

13
Why Join Gangs?
  • Prestige or status among friends
  • Make money
  • Protection from other gangs
  • Sense of identity
  • Recruitment from family, friends and peers

14
Risk Factors
  • Prior-early involvement in delinquency, violence
    and AODA issues.
  • Poor family management and problematic
    parent-child relationship.
  • Low school attachment and achievement and
    negative labeling by teachers.
  • Association with aggressive peers and peers who
    engage in delinquency.

15
Risk Factors
  • Neighborhoods in which large numbers of youth are
    in trouble and in which drugs and firearms are
    readily available.
  • The accumulation of risk factors greatly increase
    the likelihood of gang-involvement.
  • SourceThe National Youth Gang Center
    www.iir.com/nygc/faq/htm

16
What Does This Mean?
  • Participation in gang activities has a high
    probability of leading youth into criminal
    behavior and of being referred into the criminal
    justice system.
  • School to prison pipeline.
  • Schools can make a difference and need to be
    actively involved.
  • How can schools intervene?

17
Impact of Gang Membership
  • Youth are more criminally active during periods
    of active gang membership-serious and violent
    crime.
  • Negative family and school contacts.
  • Aggressive peers and delinquency.
  • Source The National Youth Gang Center
  • www.iir.com/nygc/

18
Gangs and Schools
  • More likely to bring weapons to school
  • Bring violence into schools
  • Bullying of students
  • Believe they wont graduate
  • Higher truancy rates
  • Few teacher role models
  • Alcohol and drug use, drug trafficking
  • Recruitment, intimidation/extortion

19
MMSD Gang Response
  • Acknowledge that gangs exist in our community and
    that gang involved youth attend our schools.
  • The district is committed to providing an
    orderly, safe and secure learning environment.
  • The district will support all students,
    regardless of gang affiliation.

20
Gang Response
  • The district will clearly identify behaviors that
    are unacceptable and that will not be tolerated
    in school.
  • The district will provide early intervention and
    support for gang involved youth.
  • The district will work with the students family
    to re-direct the student into positive activities.

21
Anti-gang Strategies
  • The district will provide guidance and training
    to staff and will utilize a number of measures to
    prevent gang activity in schools.
  • Measures include sanctions for violation of the
    MMSD Student Code of Conduct.
  • Referral to law enforcement for criminal
    prosecution.

22
Best Practice Intervention Suppression-Schools
  • Gang activity is about relationships,
    affiliations, power and control.
  • Interventions must also be about relationships
    affiliations without demeaning power and control.
  • Suppression efforts must be clear, direct and
    consistent.

23
Best Practice Universal Intervention
  • Build strong student/staff relationships.
  • Have opportunities for students to explore their
    power in positive ways.
  • Have opportunities to explore issues of race,
    economic status gender, bullying, harassment
    AODA.
  • Have explicitly stated student reporting policies
    and procedures.

24
Best Practice Intervention with gang involved
students
  • Engage in honest, direct and respectful
    discussions.
  • Establish the expectation that school is a gang
    free zone.
  • Reinforce the concept that they can check it at
    the door and become a student for a few hours.

25
Intervention
  • When appropriate, inform/engage the family.
  • Identify a staff member to act as a point person
    and confidant.
  • Establish and maintain a trusting relationship.
  • Create links with community agencies and police.

26
Best Practice Suppression Efforts
  • Graffiti and Tagging.
  • Symbols, hand shakes gestures.
  • Clothing colors, head gear, jewelry, haircuts.
  • Body markings, tattoos, eyebrows.
  • Internet use at school.
  • Cell phone use at school.

27
Suppression
  • Counsel, warn, inform of consequences, then
    implement the code of conduct.
  • Student searches, when appropriate.
  • Frequent student body reminders regarding
    anonymous reporting.
  • Staff policy regarding immediate reporting of
    suspicious activity.
  • Sharing of information among staff.

28
MMSD Code of Conduct
  • 107-Dress Code, disrupts teaching or poses a risk
    to safety, health/ security
  • 112-Causing a disruption
  • 114-Participating in gang activities or
    anti-social group activities that disrupt school.
  • 206-Verbal threats
  • 207-Harrassment
  • 215-Extortion, intimidation/gang

29
Code of Conduct
  • 221-Taunting, inciting, encouraging a fight
  • 301-Volatile acts
  • 308-Coercion, extortion, gang involved
  • 310-Serious threats to students or staff
  • 401-Possession of weapons
  • 402- Possession of drugs

30
Gang Activity- School and Police Consequences
  • The range of school consequences can range from
    counseling to expulsion.
  • In addition, students may be arrested for crimes
    ranging from misdemeanors such as disorderly
    conduct, to felonies.
  • Some students who have been referred to the
    criminal justice system return to our district
    under court supervision.
  • Work with community agencies.

31
Local Gangs and Identifiers
  • Gang graffiti-Important to differentiate from
    tagging.
  • Gangs-Look for numbers, 5-6 pointed stars,
    pitchforks, crowns.
  • The Surenos-SSL, XIII,13, color blue, SUR 13,
    13th letter of alphabetM, Mexican Mafia
  • Nortenos-XIV, 14, color red, CPA

32
Colors and Dress
  • People Nation, Vice Lords-Black and gold or black
    and red. Teams-Pittsburgh Pirates/Steelers.
  • Folk Nation, Gangster Disciples-Black/gray, and
    silver/white. Teams-NY Yankees, Oakland Raiders,
    Georgetown Hoyas.
  • Surenos-Blue
  • Nortenos-Red

33
(No Transcript)
34
(No Transcript)
35
(No Transcript)
36
(No Transcript)
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
(No Transcript)
40
(No Transcript)
41
Hate Groups
  • Youth are recruited through the internet.
  • White power music broker Bryant Cecchini, AKA
    Byron Calvert announced the distribution of
    30,000 CDs titled White Power and Some
    Niggers Never Die.
  • Remember, we dont just entertain racist kids,
    we create them Cecchini

42
Hate Groups
  • Hate Groups An organized group or organization
    that advocates hate, hostility, or violence
    towards members of a racial group, ethnicity,
    religion, gender, sexual orientation or other
    designated sector of society.
  • Since 2000 extremist organizations have risen by
    54.
  • Factors Failing economy, immigration fears,
    election of President OBama.

43
Hate Groups/Incidents
  • Graffiti, vandalism against synagogues, private
    property and schools.
  • Vandalism to Monona Grove, LaFollette, Sennett,
    Hamilton, East and Falk.
  • Recruitment of middle school students by the
    Nationalist Socialist Movement over the internet.

44
(No Transcript)
45
(No Transcript)
46
(No Transcript)
47
(No Transcript)
48
Dont Pre-Judge
  • Be careful not to assume anything about a student
    based on appearances.
  • Youth fashion and appearance is a universal
    urban look.
  • Hip hop culture is mainstream.
  • Analyze behavior and risk factors.
  • Be well informed and do your research.

49
Graffiti and Symbols
  • Look for gang identifiers, names, put downs.
  • Look for symbols, pitchforks, playboy bunny, top
    hat and cane, pyramids.
  • Look for numbers, 13, 14, XIII, XIV
  • Graffiti written upside down, backwards or
    crossed out shows disrespect.

50
(No Transcript)
51
(No Transcript)
52
What Can Teachers Do?
  • Contact your school principal to share
    information and to coordinate appropriate
    responses or to involve outside resources.
  • Gather information, observe, ask respectful
    questions.
  • Maintain a balanced approach.
  • Implement the Sennett model

53
School Responses
  • Who else is involved or at risk?
  • Whats the family situation? Supportive of the
    child and school or in denial or gang-involved.
  • Is the student court-involved? Coordinate with
    case worker.
  • Create an individual education plan and provide
    appropriate support systems.

54
School Engagement
  • Remember, some kids join gangs to fit in and to
    be a part of a group.
  • They may not be succeeding academically or may
    not feel comfortable at school.
  • Strategy-Offer encouragement, strive to engage
    student in school activities, clubs, sports.
  • Critical-Develop positive adult-student
    relationships.

55
What Can the Family Do?
  • Be informed, conduct additional gang research,
    identify resources.
  • If concerned about your childs behavior contact
    your school and ask for assistance, share
    information.
  • Know your childrens friends and interests.
  • Spend time with your children, seek connections
    and conversation.

56
Families
  • Maintain balance as a parent while being
    respectful of your childrens lifestyle.
  • Clearly state your attitude toward gangs.
  • Discuss values and model positive behavior.
  • Teach problem solving and negotiation skills.
  • Eat meals as a family as often as you can.

57
Family
  • Support your schools-Make them your own. Attend
    events, show interest in your childs school
    life.
  • Ask for assistance and support and take advantage
    of valuable school and community resources.

58
Summary
  • Gangs have existed in our community for some time
    and gang involved youth attend our schools.
  • National statistics indicate that gangs are
    present in many communities in the U.S. and that
    gang activity is prevalent in cities with
    populations over 100,000.
  • Most gang members are male, female involvement
    5-8.

59
Summary
  • Many gang members are recruited in middle school.
    Nationally, 7 of boys and 4 of girls
    (adolescents) reported that they had belonged to
    a gang in the past 12 months (Gottfredson and
    Gottfredson, 2001).
  • Race/Ethnicity-According to the National Youth
    Gang Survey, 49 are Latino, 34
    African-American, 10 white, 6 Asian.
  • Appropriate interventions are needed.

60
Summary
  • Middle School age students are the most
    susceptible to gang recruitment.
  • Interventions must occur in the home, at school
    and in the community.
  • Keys to success Education, collaboration among
    family, school, police and community resources.

61
Conclusion
  • Gangs are not a police or a school problem.
    Gangs are a community problem.
  • No single strategy is effective and over-reliance
    on law enforcement is counter-productive.
  • Communities need to adopt a comprehensive
    strategy that addresses the needs of families and
    of youth.

62
Conclusion
  • The family is the most influential factor in a
    childs life.
  • Despite apparent anger or display of hostility,
    children appreciate having rules and structure.

63
Commitment to Save Kids
  • If we dont stand up for our children, then we
    dont stand for much-Marian Wright Edelman,
    President and Founder of the Childrens Defense
    Fund.
  • Children are worth fighting for Principal
    Milton McPike

64
Resources
  • The National Youth Gang Center-www.iir.com/nygc/fa
    q.htm
  • The Southern Poverty Law Center-www.splcenter.org/
    index.jsp
  • The Federal Bureau of Investigation
    www.fbi.gov/hq/cid/ngic.violent_gangs
  • The Madison Police Department-Detective George
    Chavez, Officer Lester Moore

65
Resources
  • The National Youth Violence Prevention Resource
    Center-www.safeyouth.org
  • Know Gangs-www.knowgangs.com

66
  • Questions?
About PowerShow.com