Stnadard 1.2 Combine short related sentences with appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Stnadard 1.2 Combine short related sentences with appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases

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Stnadard 1.2 Combine short related sentences with appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases Learning Objective: I will combine ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Stnadard 1.2 Combine short related sentences with appositives, participial phrases, adjectives, adverbs, and prepositional phrases


1
Stnadard 1.2 Combine short related sentences with
appositives, participial phrases, adjectives,
adverbs, and prepositional phrases
2
Learning Objective I will combine short related
sentences with appositives.
3
(No Transcript)
4
noun
  • A person, place, or thing.

5
verb
  • An action word.

6
adjective
  • A describing word.

7
adverb
  • A word that describe a verb.

8
Phrases
  • A phrase is a group of words that are not a
    sentence.
  • A phrase DOES NOT have a subject and a verb

9
Phrases
  • These are the two categories of phrases that we
    have studied
  • Prepositional phrases
  • Appositive phrases

10
Phrases
  • We have already looked at prepositional phrases.
  • Now we are going to look at the second type of
    phrases - appositives

11
Appositive Phrases
  • An appositive phrase is a group of words that
    does NOT have a subject and verb.
  • It consists of a noun (and all of its modifiers)
    that renames or provides additional information
    about another noun in the sentence.

12
Appositive Phrases
  • An appositive normally sits next to the noun it
    renames in other words, it is positioned next
    to that noun, which is why it is said to be in
    apposition.

13
Appositive Phrases
  • Can you identify the appositive phrase in this
    sentence?
  • One Fish,Two Fish, my favorite book by Dr.
    Seuss, is the the only book I have read
    completely on my own.

14
Appositive Phrases
  • One Fish,Two Fish, my favorite book by Dr.
    Seuss, is the the only book I have read
    completely on my own.
  • my favorite book by Dr. Seuss renames One
    Fish,Two Fish

15
Appositive Phrases
  • My favorite president Harry Truman led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • Harry Truman is the appositive. If I do not
    include his name, you will not have enough
    information to understand my meaning completely.

16
Appositive Phrases
  • My favorite president Harry Truman led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • One check is to eliminate the appositive, and
    see what happens. Here, you have a complete
    sentence, but you really dont know to whom I am
    referring. The information is incomplete. I
    need to supply his name.

17
Appositive Phrases
  • My favorite president Harry Truman led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • The second check is to see if I can change the
    appositive and keep the meaning of the sentence.
    If I do change this appositive and put in another
    name, I have changed the meaning of the sentence
    entirely.

18
Appositive Phrases
  • My favorite president Bill Clinton led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • As you can see, this changes the basic meaning
    of the sentence, making it historically
    incorrect.

19
Appositive Phrases
  • A nonessential appositive provides information
    that in itself may be important, but is really
    only additional information and is not necessary
    to the core meaning of the sentence.
  • Commas are used to separate it from the rest of
    the sentence.

20
Appositive Phrases
  • My favorite president Harry Truman led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • If you need the phrase, you DONT need the
    commas.

21
Appositive Phrase
  • Harry Truman, my favorite president, led the
    American people through the end of World War II.
  • If you dont need the phrase, you DO need the
    commas.

22
Steps
  • Step 1 read the text carefully
  • Step 2 identify the appositive
  • Step 3 underline the appositive phrase

23
Why is this important?
  • Because using appositives will improve
  • the basic sentence structure in your writing.

24
Appositive Phrases
  • We will be working in class on ways to combine
    short, choppy, little sentences into more
    sophisticated ones.
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