Standard English - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Standard English PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 4fac6c-ZmQ2O



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Standard English

Description:

2012 11 23 A moon bright as light Moon rises in the sky, And creatures come out. As round as an apple, As deep as a pail: It never cries out ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:60
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 56
Provided by: 2098246
Learn more at: http://qkwr.net
Category:
Tags: english | eyre | jane | standard

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Standard English


1
?????????
  • ???
  • 2012?11?23?

2
English
  • Standard English
  • Queens English
  • Kings English
  • RP (Received Pronunciation)
  • BBC English

3
Varieties of English
  • British English
  • American English
  • Australian English
  • Canadian English
  • New Zealand
  • South Africa

4
  • World Englishes

5
Circles model of World Englishes
6
(No Transcript)
7
  • English Proficiency Index

8
ELT (English Language Teaching)
  • EFL (English as a Foreign Language)
  • ESL (English as a Second Language)
  • ESP (English for Special Purposes)
  • EAP (English for Academic Purposes)
  • Composition studies
  • Writing across the disciplines

9
?????????????
  • 1)????????,?????
  • 2)????(????)
  • ????
  • ???
  • 3)?????
  • ????
  • ???
  • ???
  • 4)(??)????

10
????
  • ????
  • ?????
  • ?????
  • ?????????
  • ??????????
  • ???????
  • ???????????
  • ?????????

11
??????????
?? Total 2263
???? Comprehensive University 533
???? Natural Sciences Technology 801
???? Agriculture 83
???? Forestry 18
???? Medicine Pharmacy 159
???? Teacher Training 188
???? Language Literature 48
???? Finance Economics 237
???? Political Science Law 69
???? Physical Culture 30
???? Art 80
???? Ethnic Nationality 17
??????? Of whichRegular HEIs 638
12
??????? ???????
  • Language\Literature\Culture
  • English Literature into Literature in English
  • English into World Englishes (EFL, ESL, ESP, EAP)
  • British Studies( Irish and Scottish)
  • American Studies( Hispanic and Native American)
  • Australia, New Zealand, Canada, South Africa
  • Literary into Cultural Studies (Theory)
  • Film, Communication, and Media Studies
  • Information society cyber culture internet.
  • Visual studies

13
English at Harvard
  • Department of English and American Literature and
    Language
  • Department of English

14
The National Curriculum (DfEE/QCA 1999)
  • English at Key Stage 1 (57 years) and Key Stage
    2 (711 years)
  • En 1 Speaking and Listening
  • En 2 Reading
  • En 3 Writing

15
  • Although the language processes are dealt with
    separately it is made clear that speaking and
    listening, reading and writing should be
    integrated.
  • Drama is given a welcome place in En1. Many early
    years teachers would like more recognition of the
    value of play.
  • It is implicit that language development is
    partly to do with controlling a large number of
    genre. Non-fiction reading and writing is fully
    recognised as well as the full range of fiction
    and both print and ICT forms of information texts
    are included.

16
  • Children must be taught about the structure of
    language and by Key Stage 2 (En 3) challenging
    concepts about grammar must be acquired.
  • Children must acquire standard English forms
  • in speaking and writing.

17
Shakespeare
  • The national strategies
  • Shakespeare for all ages and stages

18
?1???????????? ?1????????????
?  ? ? ? ? ?
?????????(5-7?) ?????????????????????????????????????????????????,???????????????
????(7-11?) ??????????????????????????????????,???????????????????,???????????????????????,?????????,???????????????????????????????
????(11-14?) ???????????????(??????)??????,???????????????????????,???????????????????????????????
????(14-16?) ???????????????(??????)??????,????????????,??????????????????????????
19
   
?2???????????  
? ? ? ? ? ?
???? ??????????
???? ??????????????
5? ???????????????,?????
6? ??????????????
7? ?????????????
7? ?????????,????????
8? ???????????????
9? ???????????,?????????,??????????
9? ???????????????????????????????
10? ?????????????????,??????????
11? ???????????????????????
11? ????????????????????,???21?????????
12? ????????????????????????????
12? ???????????,??????????????
13? ???????????????????
13? ????????????????,????????????
14? ??????????????????????,???????????
14? ???????????????,??????????????????
15-16? ????????????????????????
15-16? ?????????????????,????????????
20
??????
  • ????(????)
  • ?????(????)

21
???????????
  • ??????
  • ???????????
  • ?????????????????
  • ????????

22
??????????(2011 ??)
  • ??????
  • ???????????????????????????????,??????????????????
    ???????????,????????????????????,????????????????,
    ???????????????,????????????,?????????????????????
    ???????????????,????????????????????,?????????????
    ??,??????,???????,????????,??????,????????????????
    ?????????????????????????????????

23
????????
  • ????????,??????????????3?????,????????(????
    ?9??),????????????????????????????(?????????????)?
    ???????????,????????????????????????????????????,?
    ????????????????????,???????????????????

24
  • ????????,???????????????????,???6?????????
    ????,???9???????????????????????????????,?????????
    ???,??????????????????????????????????????,???????
    ????????????????????????????????????,?????????????
    ???????

25
???????? Poetry
  • Aesthetic qualities of language (???????)
  • Rhythm ??
  • Meter ??,??
  • Iambic pentameter
  • Rhyme, alliteration, assonance ??
  • Genres
  • Narrative poetry ???
  • Epic poetry ??
  • Dramatic poetry ???
  • Satirical poetry ???
  • Lyric poetry ???

26
Rhyme
  • Some say the world will end in fire,
  • Some say in ice.
  • From what Ive tasted of desire
  • I hold with those who favour fire.
  • But if it had to perish twice,
  • I think I know enough of hate
  • To say that for destruction ice
  • Is also great
  • And would suffice.
  • Rober Frost Fire and Ice (1923)

27
Rhyme
  • I shall be telling this with a sigh
  • Somewhere ages and ages hence
  • Two roads diverged in a wood, and I
  • I took the one less travelled by,
  • And that has made all the difference.
  • Robert Frost The Road Not Taken (1916)

28
alliteration
  • Betty Botter bought some butter, but, she said,
    the butter's bitter if I put it in my batter it
    will make my batter bitter,but a bit of better
    butter will make my batter better.So she bought
    a bit of butter better than her bitter
    butter,and she put it in her batter and the
    batter was not bitter.So 'twas better Betty
    Botter bought a bit of better butter.

29
Meter ??,??Iambic pentameter
  • Never, never, never, never, never!
  • Shakespeare, King Lear
  • It was the best of times, it was the
    worst of times . . .
  • Charles Dickens A Tale of Two Cities

30
pentameter
  • We hold these truths to be self-ev ident,
  • that all men are created equal, that they are
    endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable
    Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and
    the pursuit of Happiness.

31
Poetic Image
  • Although it is a cold evening,
  • down by one of the fishhouses
  • an old man sits netting,
  • his net, in the gloaming almost invisible,
  • a dark purple brown,
  • and his shuttle worn and polished.
  • The air smells so strong of codfish
  • it makes ones nose run and ones eyes water.
  • (Bishop, 1983, p. 64)

32
Haiku ??
  • I wonder who thought
  • Of having a little bug
  • Carry a night light.
  • (A short Japanese poem in three parts and usu.
    having 17 syllables)

33
  • If I eat more candy,
  • My teeth will fall out.
  • My gums will turn green
  • Like the rest of my mouth.
  • The dentist will drill me,
  • While I scream in pain,
  • A dozen long holes
  • That spill into my brain.
  • The stench of my breath
  • Will kill birds in the air
  • But
  • This candys so good
  • That I really dont care

34
  • A moonbright as light
  • Moon rises in the sky,
  • And creatures come out.

35
  • As round as an apple,
  • As deep as a pail
  • It never cries out
  • Till its caught by the tail.
  • (bell)

36
  • A house full, a hole full,
  • But you cannot gather a bowl full.
  • (fog)

37
  • Pencil
  • I am speechless
  • Yet full of words.

38
Drama
  • Tragedy
  • Comedy
  • Tragicomedy
  • History

39
Character
  • Hero/Villain Main/Minor Character
  • Hamlet, Macbeth, King Lear, Romeo and Juliet,
    Othello, Coriolanus, Shylock, Falstaff,
    Volpone, Tartuff, Faustus.
  • Robinson Crusoe, Gulliver, Jane Eyre, Tom Sawyer.

40
Plot/Action/Conflict
  • Main plot/Subplot
  • Climax

41
setting
  • Place, location, enviroment.

42
????
  • ???????/?????????1
  • 1.????
  • 2.?????
  • 3.????
  • 4.??????
  • 5.?????
  • 6.???
  • 7.????
  • 8.?????
  • 9.?????????
  • 10.?????!

43
????
  • ????(?1??)(?????????)
  • 1.?????2.???????3.?????4.??????5.??????6.??7
    .??8.????????9.??????10.??,?????

44
????
  • ????(?1??)(?????????)
  • 1.???2.?????3.?????4.??????5.??????????6.????
    7.????8.?????9.???????10.???????

45
????
  • ?????????????
  • (?????)??????????????????????????
    ??????????
  • ??
  • ?????

46
????
??????????
47
  • ?????
  • Hamlet
  • Othello
  • Romeo and Juliet
  • Baby Shakespeare
  • Tempest (??????)
  • Hamlet(??)
  • Othello(??)

48
Wisdom (Benjiamin Franklin)
  • At twenty years of age, the will reigns at
    thirty, the wit and at forty, the judgement.
  • There never was a good war, or a bad peace.
  • In this world nothing can be said to be certain,
    except death and taxes.
  • Man is a tool-making animal.
  • What is the use of a new-born child?

49
Memorable Lines in The Merchant of Venice
  • I hold the world but as the world, Gratiano/A
    stage where every man must play a part, /And mine
    a sad one.
  • Let me play the fool.
  • God made him, and therefore let him pass for a
    man.
  • When he is best, he is a little worse than a man,
    and/when he is worst, he is little better than a
    beast.
  • I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with
    you, walk with you, and so following, but I will
    not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with
    you.
  • The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
  • It is a wise father that knows his own child.

50
EXPERIENCE
  • To have seen much and to have nothing is to have
    rich eyes and poor hands.
  • As You Like It 4.1.22-3, ROSALIND TO JAQUES
  • I had rather have a fool to make me merry than
    experience to make me sad, and to travel for it
    too!
  • As You Like It 4.1.25-7, ROSALIND TO JAQUES
  • I talk of that, that know it.
  • Coriolanus 3.3.85, BRUTUS TO CORIOLANUS,
    referring to his service to Rome

51
  • O woe is me /T'have seen what I have seen, see
    what I see.
  • Hamlet 3.1.161-2, OPHELIA
  • Experience is by industry achieved,/And perfected
    by the swift course of time.
  • Two Gentlemen of Verona 1.3.22-3, ANTONIO TO
    PANTHINO
  • His years but young, but his experience old.
  • Two Gentlemen of Verona 2.4.68, VALENTINE TO THE
    DUKE

52
FEAR
  • In time we hate that which we often fear.
  • Antony and Cleopatra 1.3.13
  • To be furious /Is to be frighted out of fear.
  • Antony and Cleopatra 3.13.200-1, ANTONY TO
    CLEOPATRA
  • How now, Horatio? You tremble and look pale.
  • Hamlet 1.1.56, BARNARDO TO HORATIO
  • ALBANY YOU may fear too far.
  • GONERIL Safer than trust too far.
  • King Lear 1.4.321-2

53
IGNORANCE
  • Ignorance is the curse of God.
  • 2 Henry VI 4.7.70, LORD SAY TO JACK CADE
  • O! thou monster Ignorance.
  • Love's Labour's Lost 4.2.23, HOLOFERNES TO DULL
  • Dull unfeeling barren ignorance.
  • Richard II 1.3.168, MOWBRAY TO RICHARD
  • There is no darkness but ignorance.
  • Twelfth Night 4.2.42-3, FESTE teasing MALVOLIO

54
WISDOM
  • The fool doth think he is wise, but the wiseman
    knows himself to be a fool.
  • As You Like It 5.1.30-1, TOUCHSTONE TO WILLIAM
  • Wisdom cries out in the streets and no man
    regards it.
  • 1 Henry IV 1.1.87-8, PRINCE HAL TO FALSTAFF
  • To that dauntless temper of his mind,/He hath a
    wisdom that doth guide his valour/To act in
    safety.
  • Macbeth 3.1.51-3, MACBETH, of Banquo
  • Young in limbs, in judgement old.
  • Merchant of Venice 2.7.71, PRINCE OF MOROCCO

55
  • Thank You
About PowerShow.com