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State Advisory Group (SAG) New Member/Refresher Training April 21, 2010 Arkansas State Advisory Group

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Title: State Advisory Group (SAG) New Member/Refresher Training April 21, 2010 Arkansas State Advisory Group


1
State Advisory Group (SAG) New Member/Refresher
Training April 21, 2010 Arkansas State Advisory
Group
  • Sponsored by
  • U.S. Department of Justice
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
    Prevention (OJJDP)
  • Administered through the SAG Training Grant under
    cooperative agreement 2007MUMU0003.

2
Training Objectives
  • As a result of this training, participants will
    gain knowledge regarding
  • Key events in the history of juvenile justice
  • Components of the Juvenile Justice and
    Delinquency (JJDP) Act
  • Roles and responsibilities of SAG members
  • Overview of the Three Year Plan
  • Core Requirements of the JJDP Act
  • Juvenile justice funding streams and program
    resources
  • How to effectively utilize performance
    measurement
  • How SAG members can impact juvenile justice in
    their state

3
  • Welcome,
  • Introductions, and
  • Overview

4
History of Juvenile Justice, the JJDP Act, and
the Role of the State Advisory Group
5
History of Juvenile Justice
  • The first juvenile court in this country was
    established in 1899 in Cook County, Illinois.
  • Juvenile courts flourished for the first half
    of the 20th century.
  • By 1910, 32 States had established juvenile
    courts, probation services, or both.
  • For the next 50 years, juvenile courts had
    exclusive original jurisdiction over all youth
    under age 18.

6
Key Juvenile Court Cases
  • 1966 Kent v. U.S.
  • 1967 In re Gault
  • 2005 Roper v. Simmons

7
Juvenile Justice Legislation
  • The Juvenile Delinquency Prevention and Control
    Act of 1968
  • The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
    (JJDP) Act of 1974
  • Establishment of the Office of Juvenile Justice
    and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)
  • The 1980, 1988, and 1992 Amendments to the 1974
    Act
  • The JJDP Act of 2002

8
OJJDPs Mission
  • The mission of OJJDP is to provide national
  • leadership, coordination, and resources to
  • prevent juvenile victimization and respond
  • appropriately to juvenile delinquency.

9
The JJDP Act of 1974 created a Federal-State
Partnership
  • Each state must designate a State agency
    responsible for developing the State Plan
  • Each state must establish a State Advisory Group

10
The JJDP Act of 1974 and Non-Participating States
  • Section 223(d) of the JJDP Act indicates that if
    a State chooses not to submit a plan the funds
    will be made available to local public and
    private nonprofit agencies to carry out the
    required Formula Grant activities.
  • This is VOA in Wyoming (except the SAG)

11
  • Roles and Responsibilities of SAG Members

12
C. SAG Membership Elements
  • Appointed by the governor.
  • 15 to 33 members.
  • One fifth under age 24 (when appointed).
  • Three members who have been, or currently are,
    under the jurisdiction of the juvenile justice
    system.
  • A majority of the members shall not be full-time
    government employees (including the Chair).
  • At least one locally elected official.

13
Specified SAG Roles and Responsibilities
  • Participate in the development of the State Plan.
  • Advise the Chief Executive and the Legislature on
    compliance with the Core Requirements
    of the JJDP Act.
  • Obtain input from juveniles currently under the
    jurisdiction of the juvenile justice system.
  • Review and comment on grant proposals.
  • Monitor programs.

14
  • Inherent Responsibilities of SAG Members

15
Inherent Responsibilities of the SAG
  • Advocate, Impact, Influence
  • Policy
  • Procedures
  • System Change
  • Reform

16
Inherent Responsibilities of the SAG
  • Advocate for goals of the JJDP Act.
  • Be knowledgeable about state and federal juvenile
    justice laws.
  • Be an active SAG participant.
  • Understand the flow of the juvenile justice
    system in Arkansas.

17
Inherent Responsibilities of the SAG
  • Be familiar with facilities and programs in
    Arkansas.
  • Know your state and federal representatives
    and their staff.
  • Review the Executive Order for the SAG.
  • Can be a member of the Federal Advisory
    Committee.
  • Know whether your SAG is a decision making or
    advisory entity.
  • Develop a SAG Annual Report

18
SAG Roles and Responsibilities Small Group
Activity
19
JJDP Act Core Requirements
20
Four Core Requirements
  • Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders
    Section 223(a)(11)
  • Sight and Sound Separation
    Section 223(a)(12)
  • Jail Removal
    Section 223(a)(13)
  • Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC)
    Section 223(a)(22)

21
Core Requirement 1.
  • Deinstitutionalization of Status Offenders (1974)

Juveniles who are charged with or who have
committed an offense that would not be criminal
if committed by an adult or such non-offenders as
dependent or delinquent children, shall not be
placed in secure detention facilities or secure
correctional facilities.
This refers to the year of the JJDP Act.
22
Core Requirement 1. (contd)
  • DSO Section 223(a)(11) Status Offenses/Examples
  • Runaway
  • Ungovernable/incorrigible
  • Curfew violations
  • Truancy
  • Possession of alcohol as a minor
  • Possession of tobacco as a minor
  • Traffic violations civil in nature

23
Core Requirement 1. (contd)
  • DSO Section 223(a)(11) Status Offenses/Examples
  • Child abuse and neglect
  • Immigration violations (aliens)
  • Danger to self or others (mental health)
  • Abandonment

24
Core Requirement 2.
  • Sight and Sound Separation (1974)
  • Juveniles alleged to be or found to be
    delinquent, status offenders, and non-offenders
    will not be detained or confined in any
    institution in which they have contact with adult
    inmates.

This refers to the year of the JJDP Act.
25
Core Requirement 2. (contd)
  • Sight and Sound Separation (1974)
  • Contact is defined to include any physical or
    sustained sight and/or sound contact between
    juvenile offenders in secure custody status and
    incarcerated adults, including inmate trustees.

26
Core Requirement 3.
  • Jail Removal (1980)
  • No juvenile shall be detained or confined in any
    jail or lockup for adults. This request does not
    apply to juvenile facilities or adult prisons.

This refers to the year of the JJDP Act.
27
Core Requirement 3. (contd)
  • Adult Jail
  • What is it?
  • A locked facility, the purpose of which is to
    detain adults charged with violating criminal
    law, pending trial. These facilities are also
    used to hold convicted adult criminal offenders
    sentenced less than a year.

28
Core Requirement 3. (contd)
  • Adult Lock-up
  • What is it?
  • Similar to an adult jail, except that an adult
    lock-up is generally a municipal or police
    facility of temporary nature which does not hold
    persons after they have been formally charged.

29
JAIL REMOVAL Section 223(a)(13) (contd)
Jail Removal Exceptions
  • Six-Hour Rule
  • Court Appearance Hold
  • III. Rural Exception
  • IV. Transferred, Certified, Waived, or Direct
    File Youth

30
JAIL REMOVAL Section 223(a)(13) (contd)
I. Six-Hour Rule of Reason
  • An alleged delinquent may be detained for up to
    six hours, while separate from adults, for the
    purposes of identification, processing, and
    arranging for release to parents or transfer to
    juvenile court officials or juvenile shelter or
    detention facilities.

31
JAIL REMOVAL Section 223(a)(13) (contd)
II. Six-Hour Court Appearance Hold
  • An alleged or adjudicated delinquent may be
    detained, while separate from adults, for up to
    six hours before and after a court appearance.
  • This hold must be related to a court appearance.

32
JAIL REMOVAL Section 223(a)(13) (contd)
III. Rural Exception
  • An accused juvenile criminal-type offender may be
    detained up to 48 hours (excluding weekends and
    holidays) in an adult jail or lockup, if certain
    conditions are met.
  • This hold must be related to a court appearance.

33
IV. Transferred, Waived, Certified and Direct
File Youth
JAIL REMOVAL Section 223(a)(13) (contd)
  • Juveniles who have been transferred to adult
    court and against whom criminal felony charges
    have been filed do not fall under the auspices
    of the JJDP Act for jail removal and separation
    requirements within jails and lockups.
  • These juveniles are subject to State law.

34
Core Requirement 4.
  • Disproportionate Minority Contact (1988)

35
SAG and Compliance Monitoring
  • Submission of the Annual Report
  • Facility Visitation
  • Approval of CM Determination Report
  • Compliance Monitoring Subcommitee

36
SAG Annual Report
  • JJDP Act - 42 U.S.C. 5633 Sec. 223(a)(D)(ii)
    State Plans
  • shall submit to the chief executive officer
    and the legislature of the state at least
    annually recommendations regarding state
    compliance with the requirements of paragraphs
    (11), (12), and (13).

37
SAG Annual Report (contd)
  • Required
  • Include required recommendations regarding Core
    Requirements
  • DSO
  • Separation
  • Jail Removal
  • Best Practices
  • Consider specifying the due date for the annual
    report in your bylaws or Executive Order.
  • Include information on DMC efforts.
  • Highlight grant activities by funding source.

38
Four Core Requirements (Protections) Small Group
Activity
38
38
39
  • Overview of the Three-Year Plan

40
Three-Year State Plan
  • To receive Formula Grants, a state must submit a
    Comprehensive Three-Year Plan. The SAG shall
    participate in the development, review, and
    approval of the plan. This plan must be updated
    annually in accordance with the states
    identified priorities.

41
Where Do We Begin?
  • Review the last Three-Year Plan and the last two
    updates.
  • Collect data.
  • Plan a SAG retreat or meeting.

42
Required Contents of the Three-Year Plan
  • SF424 and Budget Summary
  • State Advisory Group Composition
  • Technical Assistance Needs
  • Staff of the Formula Grants Program
  • Analysis of Juvenile Crime Problems and Needs
  • Program Description
  • Plans for Compliance, DSO, Separation, and Jail
    Removal
  • Plans for Addressing DMC
  • Certifications Regarding Lobbying, Debarment,
    etc.

43
Three-Year Plan
  • A SAG Strategic Plan
  • One way of supporting the development of the
    Three-Year Plan

44
Three-Year Planning Cycle (one version)
45
Juvenile Justice Funding Streams and Program
Resources
46
How Juvenile Justice Funding Flows
47
What FY 2010 Funding Looks Like in Wyoming
Program FY2010 Funding
Title II 600,000
Title V 84,945
JABG 547,000
EUDL 356,400
48
Title II Formula Grants Allocation
Up to 10 percent of initial award for planning
and administration.
Other Native American pass-through amounts vary
according to each state
Five percent of the minimum state allotment is
available to assist the SAG.
A minimum of 66 2/3 of remaining funds must be
passed through to programs to address juvenile
delinquency prevention and intervention.
49
Title V Community Prevention Grants Program
  • Community-based approach to delinquency
    prevention.
  • Focus on reducing risks and enhancing protective
    factors.
  • Organizes community leaders to collect and
    analyze community risk and resource data.
  • Must be in compliance with core requirements.
  • Must have a prevention policy board.

50
Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Program (JABG)
  • States are required to pass through 75 percent of
    award to eligible units of local government,
    absent a waiver from the OJJDP Administrator.
  • Document efforts to implement a system of
    graduated sanctions for juvenile offenders.
  • Assist states, local government and communities
    to implement accountability-based programs.
  • Holds both the youth and the juvenile justice
    system accountable.

51
Enforcing Underage Drinking Laws Program (EUDL)
  • Supports efforts by states and local
    jurisdictions to prohibit the sale of alcoholic
    beverages to minors and the purchase and
    consumption of alcoholic beverages to minors.
  • Three areas of focus
  • Statewide task forces to target establishments
  • Public advertising programs
  • Innovative programs
  • State agency may be different than the designated
    state agency.

52
Continuum of Services for Youth and Families
  • Problem Behavior gt Noncriminal Misbehavior gt
    Delinquency gt Serious, Violent, and Chronic
    Offending

Prevention Target Population At-Risk Youth
Intervention Target Population Delinquent Youth
Programs for Youth at Greatest Risk
Programs for All Youth
gt
gt
Immediate Intervention
gt
Intermediate Sanctions
gt
Community Confinement
gt
Training Schools
gt
Aftercare
  • Youth Habilitation Goals
  • Healthy family participation
  • Community reintegration
  • Educational success and skills development
  • Healthy peer network development
  • Prosocial values development
  • Healthy lifestyle choices
  • Youth Development Goals
  • Healthy and nurturing families
  • Safe communities
  • School attachment
  • Prosocial peer relations
  • Personal development and life skills
  • Healthy lifestyle choices

53
Continuum of Services for Youth and Families
  • Problem Behavior gt Noncriminal Misbehavior gt
    Delinquency gt Serious, Violent, and Chronic
    Offending

Prevention Target Population At-Risk Youth
Intervention Target Population Delinquent Youth
Formula Grants Program
Programs for Youth at Greatest Risk
Programs for All Youth
gt
gt
Immediate Intervention
gt
Intermediate Sanctions
gt
Community Confinement
gt
Training Schools
gt
Aftercare
Title V Program
  • Youth Habilitation Goals
  • Healthy family participation
  • Community reintegration
  • Educational success and skills development
  • Healthy peer network development
  • Prosocial values development
  • Healthy lifestyle choices
  • Youth Development Goals
  • Healthy and nurturing families
  • Safe communities
  • School attachment
  • Prosocial peer relations
  • Personal development and life skills
  • Healthy lifestyle choices

JABG Program
EUDL
54
Raising the Bar Through Performance Measurement
55
Priority for Evidence-Based Programs and
Increased Accountability Title II
  • FORMULA GRANTS PROGRAM (Title II)
  • JJDP Act of 2002 states
  • Designated state agency will, to the extent
    practicable, give priority in funding to programs
    and activities that are based on rigorous,
    systematic, and objective research that is
    scientifically based.
  • The state agency shall not expend funds to carry
    out a program if such program, during the
    preceding two-year period, fails to demonstrate,
    before the expiration of such two-year period,
    that such program achieved substantial success in
    achieving the goals specified.

56
What Is Performance Measurement?
  • Performance measurement is a system of tracking
    progress in accomplishing specific goals,
    objectives, and outcomes.
  • Performance measurement
  • Is directly related to program goals and
    objectives.
  • Measures progress quantitatively.
  • Is not exhaustive.
  • Provides a temperature readingit may not tell
    you everything you want to know but provides a
    quick and reliable gauge of selected results.

57
Performance Measurement Web Site http//www.ojjdp-
dctat.org/
58
  • How SAG Members Can Make an Impact on Juvenile
    Justice in Their State

59
Inherent Responsibilities of the SAG
  • Advocate, Impact, Influence
  • Policy
  • Procedures
  • System Change
  • Reform

60
Ways SAG Members Can Affect
Juvenile Justice
  • Serve on a planning committee
  • Serve on grant review committees
  • Provide testimony as requested
  • Inform and educate legislators or administrators
  • Ensure that juvenile justice policy is addressing
    public and participant needs
  • Assist in the writing the SAG annual report
  • Sponsor conferences or other events

61
  • Resources and Summary

62
Online Resources
www.dsgonline.com/sag
  • Subscribe to JUVJUST and OJJDP News _at_ a Glance
    at http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/enews/enews.html
  • Visit OJJDP Web site at http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov
  • Compliance http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/compliance
  • DMC http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/dmc
  • DMC-Reduction Best Practices Database
    http//mpg.dsgonline.com/dmc_default.aspx
  • EUDL http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/programs/ProgSumma
    ry.asp?pi17
  • JABG http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/jabg
  • Model Programs Guide http//www.dsgonline.com/
    mpg2.5/mpg_index.htm
  • Performance Measures http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/gr
    antees/pm/index.html
  • State Advisory Group Training Grant
    http//www.sag.dsgonline.com
  • Statistical Briefing Book http//ojjdp.ncjrs.g
    ov/ojstatbb/index.html
  • Title II Formula Grants Program
    http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/programs/ProgSummary.asp?pi
    16
  • Title V Community Prevention Grants Program
    http//ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/titlev/index.html
  • ? Additional Resources
  • Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile
    Justice http//www.facjj.org
  • Development Services Group
    http//www.dsgonline.com

63
Summary
  • What We Covered
  • Core Requirements of the JJDP Act
  • Federal funding sources
  • Overview of the Three Year Plan
  • Roles and Responsibilities of SAG members
  • How SAG members can impact Juvenile Justice
  • Understanding Disproportionate Minority Contact
  • Whats Next?

64
www.ojjdp.ncjrs.org
  • THANK YOU!
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