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Low-Income Children and Early Childhood Education National Perspectives on Texas

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Low-Income Children and Early Childhood Education National Perspectives on Texas J. Lee Kreader, Ph.D. Deputy Director National Center for Children in Poverty – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Low-Income Children and Early Childhood Education National Perspectives on Texas


1
Low-Income Children and Early Childhood Education
National Perspectives on Texas
  • J. Lee Kreader, Ph.D.
  • Deputy Director
  • National Center for Children in Poverty

LBJ School of Public Affairs University of Texas
at Austin October 29, 2012
2
National Center for Children in Poverty
  • NCCP is a leading public policy center dedicated
    to the economic security, health, and well-being
    of Americas low-income children and families.
  • Part of Columbia Universitys Mailman School of
    Public Health, NCCP promotes family-oriented
    solutions at the state and national levels.
  • Our Vision
  • Families that are economically secure
  • Strong, nurturing families
  • Healthy child development

3
Presentation Overview and Resources
  • Early Childhood Population
  • NCCPs State Demographic Profiles
  • NCCPs Young Child Risk Calculator
  • Early Childhood EducationAccess and Quality
  • NCCPs State Policy Profiles Improving the Odds
    for Young Children
  • www.nccp.org

4
Resources continued
  • Research from other organizations, including
  • Child Trends
  • University of Minnesota, Liz Davis
  • National Institute for Early Education Research,
    Rutgers
  • National Womens Law Center
  • Much is accessible through NCCPs
  • Child Care Early Education Research
    Connections
  • www.researchconnections .org

5
  • The Early Childhood Population
  • Poverty and Low Income

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12
  • The Early Childhood Population
  • Selected Dimensions of Poverty

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16
The Early Childhood Populations Risks
  • Living in poverty
  • Living in linguistically isolated household
  • Living with four or more children
  • Parent has less than a high school education
  • Children have changed residences in last 12
    months
  • Living with a single parent
  • Having a teen mother
  • Parent has no paid employment

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  • Access to Early Childhood Education

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22
Texas Public School Prekindergarten
  • NIEER State Preschool Yearbook, 2011
  • Access-
  • 8th nationally for 4-year-olds52
  • 12th for 3-year-olds6
  • Resources-
  • 22nd for State Spending--3,761 per child
    enrolled
  • 27th for All Reported Spending
  • Quality Benchmarks-
  • 4 of 10 metComprehensive Early Learning
    Standards, Teacher BA Specialized Training,
    Teacher In-Service

23
  • Quality of Early Childhood Education

24
Quality of Care Used by 24-Month-Olds by Family
Poverty Status
Poor Non-Poor
Max Possible Mean Mean Sig.
FDCRS Total Score 1-7 2.79 3.63
ITERS Total Score 1-7 4.16 4.26
Arnett Total Score 1-78 58.39 62.17
Source. Analyses of the ECLS-B data conducted by
Child Trends. Analyses conducted on the full
subsample of children for whom there is quality
observation data
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26
Promoting the use of regulated care Texas
Dont be in the dark campaign
  • Your year-long television and radio campaign in
    2010 to educate parents/caregivers about the
    importance of choosing regulated care.
  • From your website www.DontBeInTheDark.org
  • Unregulated child care may seem convenient and
    affordable but it leaves you and your child in
    the dark. 
  • Unregulated care means no inspections, no
    training, no one enforcing basic health and
    safety standards, and no compliance record to
    check.
  • Links to state website for searching for licensed
    child care providers, including 2 years of
    compliance history at
  • TxChildCareSearch.org 

27
Promoting use of high quality programs QRIS
  • Quality Rating and Improvement System
  • Components
  • Quality standards
  • Process to assign ratings
  • Supports for program quality improvement
  • Financial incentives for programs and parents
  • Outreach and marketing

28
The number of QRIS in states and local areas has
increased dramatically in recent years.
Tout et al., 2010
29
Density of eligible program participation in QRIS
Percent range of all programs participating in the QRIS Number of QRIS
60 or greater 6 New Mexico, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee
30 to 59 4 California (LA County), District of Columbia, Florida Miami Dadea Louisiana
10 to 29 9 Colorado, Florida (Palm Beach)b, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Ohio, Vermont, Virginia
Less than 10 3 Delaware, Maryland, New Hampshire
Tout et al., 2010
30
Moving Forward . . . . .
  • Congratulations to Texas on its rich Needs
    Assessmentsure to help the state better
    understand and respond to the needs of its early
    childhood population enhance its range of
    services
  • And to the Early Learning Council on promising
    initiativesseveral of which anticipate
    recommendations from the Needs Assessment . . .
    and from NCCPs tools.
  • Thank you for the opportunity to share some
    perspectives and resources and to learn from you.
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