12th Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health What Works in Schools: Sustaining a National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health October 25-27, 2007 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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12th Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health What Works in Schools: Sustaining a National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health October 25-27, 2007

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Title: 12th Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health What Works in Schools: Sustaining a National Community of Practice on Collaborative School Behavioral Health October 25-27, 2007


1
12th Annual Conference on Advancing School
Mental Health What Works in Schools Sustaining
a National Community of Practice on Collaborative
School Behavioral Health October 25-27, 2007
  • THE IMPLEMENTATION OF POSITIVE BEHAVIORAL
    INTERVENTIONS (PBIS) AND SUPPORTS IN MARYLANDS
    SCHOOLS
  • Andrea Alexander, Maryland State Department of
    Education
  • Susan Barrett, Sheppard Pratt Health System
  • Phil Leaf, Johns Hopkins University

2
  • Bills in Congress aim to strengthen, coordinate
    PBS efforts
  • State positive behavior support programs would
    get a boost in funding and federal support under
    two proposals being considered in Congress. They
    are under committee review.
  • The Reducing Barriers to Learning Act of 2007
    (H.R. 3419) would establish an Office of
    Specialized Instructional Support Services in the
    Education Department that would award grants to
    states to hire coordinators to oversee
    specialized instructional support services, which
    could include all types of related services, such
    as speech, behavior and counseling therapy.
  • The Positive Behavior for Effective Schools Act
    (H.R. 3407 and S. 2111) would add PBS language
    into a reauthorized NCLB, encouraging states and
    districts to use Title I money for PBS efforts.
  • The proposals also would amend current programs
    that focus on substance abuse and violence to
    focus on prevention and improving school climates
    through positive behaviors. These bills also
    propose the creation of an Office of Specialized
    Instructional Support Services.
  • Related service providers and supporters of PBS
    programs are thrilled with the bills, both of
    which promise to coordinate general and special
    education services aimed at improving
    non-academic programs that contribute to
    students' academic success

3
Stacy Skalski, Director of Public Policy,
National Association of School Psychologistsquote
from Education Week interview on Student Mental
Health The Schools Role April 25, 2007
  • There are numerous school-based interventions
    that have proven effectiveness. SAMHSA has a
    great online listing of evidenced based
    intervention model programs for children and
    adolescents that can be used in schools. Perhaps
    the most promising currently is Positive Behavior
    Interventions and Supports (PBIS). Research on
    PBIS shows that when schools engage in system
    wide efforts to provide positive behavior
    supports, students are more engaged and
    successful in school.

4
What SW-PBS is
  • Evidenced based practices imbedded in a systems
    change process
  • A prevention continuum
  • A process with conceptual foundations in Applied
    Behavior Analysis (ABA)
  • A framework for organizing mental health supports
    and services

5
School-Wide Systems for Student SuccessA
Response to Intervention Model
Academic Systems
Behavioral Systems
1-5
1-5
5-10
5-10
80-90
80-90
6
(No Transcript)
7
PBS Systems Implementation Logic
Visibility
Political Support
Funding
Leadership Team
Active Coordination
Training
Coaching
Evaluation
Local School Teams/Demonstrations
8
Maryland PBIS Partnership and Collaboration
9
PBIS Maryland - Our 9th Year!!!
  • 3.5 State Coordinators
  • 8 District Coordinators
  • 700 schools projected to be involved by 2010
  • 2.5 million hits on www.pbismaryland. org since
    March 2006

10
Maryland Organizational Model
  • School Level
  • 559 PBIS Teams (one per school)
  • - Team leaders (one per school)
  • - Behavior Support Coaches (383)
  • District Level (24)
  • Regional Coordinators
  • State Level
  • State Leadership Team
  • - Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE)
  • - Sheppard Pratt Health System
  • - Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention of Youth
    Violence
  • - 24 Local school districts
  • - Department of Juvenile Services, Mental Health
    Administration
  • Management Team
  • Advisory Group
  • National Level
  • National PBIS Technical Assistance Center
  • - University of Oregon University of
    Connecticut

11
Marylands Annual PBIS Training Events
  • Spring Forum
  • March 27, 2007
  • Coaches and New Team Institute
  • Coaches July 9, 2007
  • Elementary July 10 11, 2007
  • Secondary July 11 12, 2007
  • Returning Team by Region
  • Central Region 1 July 16 17, 2007
  • Eastern Shore July 17 18, 2007
  • Western Region July 18 19, 2007
  • Central Region 2 July 19 20, 2007
  • Southern Region August 2 3, 2007
  • Coaches Meetings (4/year)
  • Regional Team Leader/Coach Meetings (2/year)
  • Schools serving students with special needs -
    MANSEF (2/year)
  • High Schools (2/year)

12
The Power Of Teaching
  • If a child doesnt know how to read, we teach.
  • If a child doesnt know how to swim, we teach.
  • If a child doesnt know how to multiply, we
    teach.
  • If a child doesnt know how to drive, we teach.
  • If a child doesnt know how to behave, we
  • teach? punish?
  • Why cant we finish the last sentence as
    automatically as we do the others?

PBIS Philosophy
13
So,.what is PBIS?
PBIS is a broad range of systemic
individualized strategies for achieving important
social learning outcomes while
preventing problem behavior with all students.
Not limited to any particular group
of studentsits for all students
Not a specific practice or curriculumits
a general approach to preventing problem behavior
Not newits based on long history of behavioral
practices effective instructional design
strategies
14
What SW-PBS is NOT
  • A curriculum, a packaged program
  • Just about tangible reinforcers
  • Just about discipline
  • A Special Education Program

15
BIG IDEAS
  • PBIS organizes the Host Environment
  • How decisions are made,
  • How things are done, and
  • How staff interact with students,
  • to ensure the sustained use of best practices
    school-wide.

16
FEW Tertiary Prevention Specialized
Individualized Systems Behavior Support
Plan Coordination with Community Resources
CONTINUUM OF SCHOOL-WIDE INSTRUCTIONAL
POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT
5
15
SOME Secondary Prevention Specialized
Group Systems -Check In/ Check Out -Newcomers
Club -Homework Club -Peer Mentoring -Referral to
Counseling, PPW, School Psych, social worker
ALL Primary Prevention gt35 of students
receive 1 or more office referrals
80 of Students
17
Continuum of Support for Secondary-Tertiary Level
Systems
  • Targeted group interventions (BEP, Check and
    Connect, social or academic skills groups,
    tutor/homework clubs, etc)
  • Targeted group with a unique feature for an
    individual student
  • Individualized function based behavior support
    plan for a student focused on one specific
    problem behavior
  • Behavior Support Plan across all settings (ie
    home and school)
  • Wraparound More complex and comprehensive plan
    that address multiple life domain issues across
    home, school and community (i.e. basic needs, MH
    treatment as well as beahvior/academic
    intervemtions)

18
Types of Group Interventions
  • Check in/ Check Out Systems
  • Check and Connect
  • Newcomers Club
  • Homework Study Groups
  • Anger Management Group
  • Other Social Skills Groups
  • Support Groups (divorce, death, etc)

19
Similarities Across all Three Levels
  • Team-based decision-making
  • Consensus around proactive strategies
  • Ownership by those closest to kids practical
    real
  • Use real data to guide interventions
  • Translate teacher/family/student stories into
    data
  • Who, what, when, why
  • Ask whats it going to take to get improvement we
    want?

20
Students with dangerous problem behavior (1-2)

Functional Analysis Specialized Individual
Intervention

The Challenge Coordinated systems to
support prevention and intervention across the
continuum of supports
Students with chronic/serious problem
behavior (3-7)
Functional Behavioral Assessment Specialized
Individual Intervention

Students at risk For problem Behaviors (515)
Simple Functional Assessment Specialized Group
Interventions

Students with mild or no problem Behaviors (80-85
)
Assessment of System Universal Interventions
21
Social Competence Academic Achievement
OUTCOMES
Supporting Decision Making
DATA
Supporting Staff Behavior
SYSTEMS
PRACTICES
Supporting Student Behavior
22
Summary of PBIS BIG IDEAS
  • 1. Systems (How things are done)
  • Team based problem solving
  • Data-based decision making
  • Long term sustainability
  • 2. Data (How decisions are made)
  • On going data collection use
  • ODRs ( per day per month, location, behavior,
    student)
  • Suspension/expulsion, attendance, tardies
  • 3. Practices (How staff interact with students)
  • Direct teaching of behavioral expectations
  • On-going reinforcement of expected behaviors
  • Functional behavioral assessment

23
Critical Features
  1. Establish Commitment
  2. Establish and Maintain Team
  3. Self-Assessment
  4. Establish School-Wide Expectations
  5. Establish On-Going System of Rewards
  6. Establish System for Responding to Behavioral
    Violations
  7. Establish Information System
  8. Build Capacity for Function-Based Support
  9. Build District Level Support

24
Create working environments where employees
(Buckingham Coffman 2002, Gallup)
1 million workers, 80,000 managers, 400 companies
  • 1. Know what is expected
  • 2. Have materials equipment to do job correctly
  • 3. Receive recognition each week for good work.
  • 4. Have supervisor who cares, pays attention
  • 5. Receive encouragement to contribute improve
  • 6. Can identify person at work who is best
    friend.
  • 7. Feel mission of organization makes them feel
    like their jobs are important
  • 8. See people around them committed to doing good
    job
  • 9. Feel like they are learning new things
    (getting better)
  • 10. Have opportunity to do their job well.

25
Questions that Guide Decision Making
  • Is there a problem?
  • What areas/systems are involved?
  • Are there many students or a few involved?
  • What kind of problem behaviors are occurring?
  • When and where are these behaviors most likely to
    occur?
  • What is the most effective use of our resources
    to address this problem?

26
What does it take to implement PBIS in a school?
  • Administrator Support for the PROCESS
  • 80 staff buy in to school-wide expectations,
    acknowledgement system and providing data
  • Understanding of a systems-based preventive
    continuum of behavior support
  • Understanding the value of establishing the
    universal level on which to build targeted and
    intensive interventions
  • Awareness that the catalyst for students
    behavior change is the necessary shift in adult
    behavior

27
What does it take to implement PBIS in a school?
(cont)
  • Establish competence in managing behavior
  • Utilize data based decisions school wide
  • Give priority to academic success
  • Invest in evidence-based practices
  • Teach acknowledge behavioral expectations
  • Work from a person-centered, function-based
    approach
  • Arrange to work smarter

28
What does PBIS look like in a school?
  • gt80 of students can tell you what is expected of
    them give behavioral example because they have
    been taught, actively supervised, practiced,
    acknowledged.
  • Visible positive adult-to-student interactions
    exceed negative.
  • Data- team-based action planning
    implementation are operating.
  • Function based behavior support is foundation for
    addressing problem behavior.
  • Administrators are active participants.
  • Full continuum of behavior support is available
    to all students

29
PBIS Marylands Evaluation Processes
30
Establishing Measurable Outcomes
  • What schools have been trained and are active?
  • How well are schools implementing PBIS?
  • What impact does PBIS have on student behavior?
    Achievement?

31
Monitoring Outcomes
  • Team Implementation Checklist
  • SWIS
  • SET
  • Coaches Checklist
  • Staff Survey
  • Satisfaction Surveys
  • Implementation Phases Inventory (IPI)

32
Evaluation Tools
  • Access 2003 Database
  • Data entry/storage
  • Report Generation

33
Evaluation Tools
  • Maryland website www.pbismaryland.org
  • Various levels Any user
  • Team/coach
  • LSS Point of Contact
  • State Team
  • Maryland Forms Matrix
  • Access Database
  • SWIS
  • PBS surveys (www.pbssurveys.org)

34
(No Transcript)
35
How Well are Schools Implementing?
  • Systems-wide Evaluation Tool (SET)
  • Annually
  • 7 Features of SW Implementation
  • Implementation Phases Inventory (IPI)
  • Semi-annually
  • Levels of SW Preparation, Initiation,
    Implementation, and Maintenance

36
School-Wide Evaluation Tool35 Coaches trained
as SET assessors15 Contractual SET assessors
  • 97 SETs completed 2004
  • 154 SETs completed 2005
  • 157 SETs completed 2006
  • 104 schools have at least two SET scores
  • 80 Total score is considered Maintenance Phase
    (IPI)
  • All regions met 80 criterion across schools
  • 69 increase after one year of implementation

37
DATA
38
SET Scores by Region
39
(No Transcript)
40
Cost Benefit Middle School
  • Base Line - Office Referrals2277
  • Year One - Office Referrals1322
  • Decrease in Office Referrals 955
  • (42)

41
Cost Benefit Middle School
  • If one Office Referral takes 15 minutes for an
    administrator to process, then
  • 955 x 15 14,325 minutes
  • 238.75 hours or
  • 40 days
  • of administrator time recovered and reinvested.

42
Cost Benefit Middle School
  • If a student misses 45 minutes of instructional
    time/Office Referral, then
  • 955 x 45 minutes
  • 42,975 minutes
  • 716.25 hours or
  • 119 days
  • of instructional time recovered!!!!!

43
Next Steps in Evaluation
  • Shifting to the BOQ-MD
  • PBIS Plus-MD
  • Continuous Improvement re forms-MD
  • National sharing of expertise is sustainability
    of PBIS-National
  • Continued funding and support of the National
    Centers ongoing research and evaluation-National
  • APBS focus on research--National

44
Commonalities between School-Based Mental Health
and SW-PBS
45
Shared Goals
  • Success for all youth at school, home, community
  • Academic/social/emotional success
  • Safe, effective, supportive learning environments
  • Systemic approaches that are prevention based
  • Culturally Relevant interventions
  • Focus on building skills and building on strengths

46
Shared Challenges
  • Quality of the fidelity of implementation of
    interventions
  • Low capacity for utilizing data-based decision
    making
  • Fragmentation of efforts on behalf of youth
  • Few and/or inconsistent behavior practices in
    schools that are proven to be effective
  • Environments that are toxic for youth with MH
    challenges (in the home, school, or community)

47
Shared Frustrations
  • Behavior Support only structured in Special
    Education
  • Proactive approaches are considered and
    implemented only after many failures
  • Interventions are often based on what we have
    instead of what the youth and family needs
  • Related initiatives become new silos with
    separate funding, training and implementation
    structures (i.e RtI, SEL, SBMH)

48
Missed Opportunity for Positive Behavior
Support.??
  • Kindergartner tantrums hurts small animals
  • In principals office by noon daily
  • Waiting to be accepted for MH assessment
  • No FBA/BIP done
  • Although transitions were a known trigger
  • School became immobilized by the setting events
    (i.e. possible psychiatric disorder)

49
Efforts to Build on Existing Initiatives in
Maryland
50
USDEs Mental Health Integration Grant-Round 1
  • Grants for the Integration of Schools and Mental
    Health Systems will provide funds to increase
    student access to high-quality mental health care
    by developing innovative approaches that link
    school systems with the local mental health
    system.
  • Call for proposals posted in April 2005
  • Grant Due in May 2005
  • Notified of award in September 2005
  • 1 of 20 funded projects (84 total applicants)

51
Marylands Strengths
  • Commitment from key local, state, and national
    partners to collaborate and form an Alliance to
    advance school-mental health system integration
    in Maryland
  • Strong support for childrens mental health and
    school mental health in the state
  • A strong PBIS structure within the state and an
    interest in enhancing mental health support and
    resources for red and yellow zone youth
  • State-wide needs assessment data indicated need
    for additional mental health training

52
Required Grant Components
  • Enhance collaboration between schools and mental
    health systems to improve prevention, diagnosis
    and treatment for students
  • Enhance crisis intervention, appropriate
    referrals and ongoing mental health services
  • Training for school personnel and mental health
    providers
  • Technical assistance and consultation to the
    school system, mental health agencies and
    families
  • Provide linguistically appropriate and culturally
    competent services
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of increasing student
    access to quality mental health services

53
Maryland School Mental Health Alliance (MSMHA)
  • Maryland State Department of Education
  • Center for School Mental Health Analysis and
    Action - University of Maryland
  • Center for Prevention and Early Intervention -
    Johns Hopkins University
  • Governors Office for Children
  • Maryland Assembly on School-Based Health Care
  • Maryland Coalition of Families for Childrens
    Mental Health
  • Maryland Department of Juvenile Services
  • Mental Hygiene Administration Department of
    Health and Mental Hygiene
  • Mental Health Association of Maryland

54
County Integration Teams
  • Comprised of families, educational staff, PBIS
    leaders, child and adolescent mental health
    system representatives, leaders from the
    Department of Juvenile Services, and other
    community partners
  • Responsible for pursing improved school-mental
    health system integration in their county
    through
  • Active communication
  • Needs assessment
  • Resource sharing
  • Problem solving

55
What does my county receive?
  • Train-the-Trainer Trainings for PBIS
    Coaches/Leaders to Enhance Mental Health
    Identification and Referral and Effective
    Classroom Management for Students with Mental
    Health Concerns
  • Access to the MSMHA website
  • Technical Assistance/Consultation from the CSMHA
    and other Management Team Agenices/Organizations
  • Newsletter Highlighting the Five County
    Initiative
  • A Voice in Improving Mental Health Integration
    into PBIS Schools in Maryland
  • More Focus on Red and Yellow Zone Youth
  • Resources to advance mental health identification
    and referral and family involvement within the
    school setting
  • Hopefully Improved Academic and
    Emotional/Behavioral Outcomes
  • Funding, 10,000

56
Creating and Sustaining Environments to Support
Teaching and Learning inBaltimore City
COLLABORATIVE
COMPREHENSIVE
April Lewis, Baltimore City Public School
System Philip J. Leaf, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
Bloomberg School of Public Health
COORDINATED
COMMITTED
57
PLAN NECESITATED BY CORRECTIVE ACTION MANDATED BY
MSDE
BCPSS required to partner with Johns Hopkins
University, Sheppard Pratt Health System, Inc.,
or another agency approved by MSDE to develop a
comprehensive safety plan.
58
BCPSS Goal 4 All students will be educated in
learning environments that are safe, drug-free,
and conducive to learning.

While the student is the central focus of the
Baltimore City Public School Systems (BCPSS)
efforts to create safe and supportive schools,
BCPSS chose to develop a plan that considers the
roles of staff, families, and community members
in creating positive learning environments.
59
Parameters of the Plan
  • The Plan
  • Focuses on changing the behaviors of adults
  • Recommends specific research-based strategies
  • Uses a multi-component approach
  • Includes universal prevention, targeted
    prevention, and remedial efforts
  • Focuses on teaching and student support
  • Targets strategies at specific, identified needs
  • Identifies roles and responsibilities for
    implementation and establishes a system-level
    management team to meet weekly to review data

60
Comprehensive Safety Plan Development
Collaboration and coordination are inherent in
the process
  • A written plan was developed and approved by a
    Steering Committee chaired by the Student
    Services Officer and Dr. Leaf (JHU Center for the
    Prevention of Youth Violence) and including
    school system CEO, Mayor, States Attorney,
    Police and Health Commissioners, union
    representatives, community and parent advocates,
    local service providers and university faculty
  • Includes workgroups work groups have school
    system and non-school system co-chairs
  • Implementation is concurrent with development and
    emphasizes coaching and mentoring
  • Involves a nine component prevention and
    intervention strategy

61
Comprehensive Safety Plan Development
Collaboration and coordination are inherent in
the process
  • Supported training and mentoring of school teams
  • Implementation is concurrent with development and
    emphasizes coaching and mentoring
  • Involves a nine component prevention and
    intervention strategy
  • Utilizes multiple data sources to determine
    strengths, gaps, and needs

62
STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLAN
CITYWIDE COLLABORATION
Agency Partners
Academic Collaborators
Crisis Management Teams
Steering Committee Workgroups
Management Team
DISTRICT-WIDE COORDINATION
CAO Cabinet
PCAB
Office for Safe and Supportive Learning
Environments
Executive Leadership Team
Staff Unions
SCHOOLS, FAMILIES, NEIGHBORHOODS
Crisis Management Teams
Student Organizations
Parent Organizations
PBIS Team
Student Support and School Improvement Teams
Community-based Organizations
63
Key External Collaborators
  • Johns Hopkins Center for Youth Violence
    Prevention
  • Baltimore Mental Health Systems, Inc.
  • Family League of Baltimore City, Inc.
  • Baltimore Community School Connections
  • Department of Juvenile Services
  • Sheppard Pratt Health System, Inc.
  • Office of the States Attorney
  • Open Society Institute
  • Baltimore City Health Department
  • Mayors Office
  • Baltimore City Police Department
  • Department of Social Services
  • Towson University
  • Maryland State Department of Education
  • Parent and Community Advisory Board

64
Key Internal Collaborators
  • Chief Executive and Academic Officers
  • School Police
  • Office of Teacher Principal Quality
  • Office of Parent Involvement and School, Family,
    Community Connections
  • Division of Research, Evaluation, Accountability,
    and Assessment
  • Office of Student Support Services
  • Suspension Services Unit
  • Curriculum and Instruction and Multicultural and
    Diversity Programs
  • Related Services Unit
  • Office of School Improvement
  • Office of Early Childhood Programs
  • Area Officers, Principals, Teachers, and Students

65
Implementation Progress
  • Development of Plan, Steering Committee,
    Management Team, and Workgroups
  • Professional development in positive behavioral
    strategies given increase emphasis in system-wide
    and school professional development activities
  • Workshops and coaching on Data-Driven
    Decision-making and Utilization of Interventions
    for SSTs, SITs, and PBIS Teams in 95 schools in
    school improvement
  • Strategy for sharing data between School Police
    and other departments
  • Conference planning for transition of youth from
    Department of Juvenile Services facilities

66
Implementation Progress
  • Expansion of PBIS
  • Enhanced incentives including work stipends for
    over-age students in middle school and high
    school students
  • Increased assessment capacity for truant students
    or with juvenile justice involvement
  • Increased community support including mentoring
    of students

67
Comprehensive Safety Plan Components
Implementation is concurrent with development
  • Data-based Decision-making
  • School-Family Engagement
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Curriculum and Instruction
  • Professional Development
  • Youth Development and Leadership
  • Intervention Services and Supports
  • Community Involvement
  • Safe Facilities
  • Unsafe School Choice Option

68
Most Sections Contain
  • A Guiding Principle
  • Background Information
  • Applicability to the BCPSS
  • Key Implementation Tips
  • Shared Roles and Responsibilities
  • Recommendations for Continued Planning and
  • Fiscal Status

69
THEMES
Cut across all workgroups
  • Data-based Decision-making
  • Emphasis on Creating Positive Learning
    Environment and Rewording Positive Behaviors
  • Family and Community Involvement
  • Professional Development
  • Communication
  • School Police Activities Integration into Overall
    Plan

70
Development of Action Plans
  • Strategies and Activities
  • Timelines for Implementation
  • Duties and Responsibilities
  • Oversight Responsibilities Identified
  • Data and Evaluation Procedures

71
School-based Plans
  • Integrated into the School Improvement Plan
  • Developed by teams including parents
  • Include an assessment of progress and needs and
    must include/parent/family involvement
  • Utilize data for effective decision-making and
    resource allocation
  • Should be viewed as dynamic rather than static

72
Resources
  • (Fixen, et al, 2005)Implementation Research A
    Synthesis of the Literature http//mim.fmhi.usf.ed
    u
  • (Kutash et al, 2006) School-based Mental Health
    An Empirical Guide for Decision-Makers
    http//rtckids.fmhi.usf.edu
  • (Bazelon Center, 2006)Way to Go.School Success
    for Children with Mental Health Care Needs
    www.bazelon.org
  • www.pbismaryland.org
  • www.pbis.org
  • http//csmha.umaryland.edu,

73
  • Maryland State PBIS Coordinators
  • Andrea Alexander, MSDE
  • aalexander_at_msde.state.md.us
  • Susan Barrett, SPHS
  • sbarrett_at_pbismaryland.org
  • Phil Leaf, JHU
  • pleaf_at_jhsph.edu
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