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Taking Steps to Healthy Success: An Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative to Promote Healthy Practices and Prevent Obesity

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Title: Taking Steps to Healthy Success: An Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative to Promote Healthy Practices and Prevent Obesity


1
Taking Steps to Healthy SuccessAn
Early Care and Education Learning Collaborative
to Promote Healthy Practices and Prevent Obesity
An Overview of Health Promotion and Obesity
Prevention
2
U.S. First Lady Michelle Obama
  • Video Michelle Obamas speech

3
Welcome to the Early Care and Education Learning
Collaborative (ECELC)!
  • Community of learners
  • Network of shared ideas
    and mutual support
  • Resources for healthy practice and policy changes
  • Research on best ways to implement best practices

3
4
What is healthy development?
  • Childrens ability, with appropriate support, to
  • Develop and realize their potential
  • Satisfy their needs
  • Interact successfully with their physical, and
    social environments.1
  • Multidimensional and cross-domain1, 2, 3
  • Influenced by responsive relationships, safe and
    engaging environments to explore, good nutrition
    2, 3, 4, 5
  • Foundation for success in learning and life 2, 3,
    4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

4
5
Foundations of Healthy Development 2
Safe, Supportive Environments
Stable, Responsive Relationships
Appropriate Nutrition and Health Behaviors
6
Learning Collaborative Round One
  • The first collaborative by Nemours in 2008
  • Nemours works with Delaware communities to impact
    children where they live, learn, and play!
  • Concern about the obesity epidemic
  • 100 made significant changes in healthy eating
    or physical activity 81 significant changes in
    both

7
Learning Collaborative Round Two
  • Focus on quality early care and education (ECE),
    and health as the foundation for life-long
    success
  • 100 made targeted health policy and practice
    changes
  • Obesity prevention in the context of health
    promotion made possible by the
    of providers

power
7
8
Early Care and Education Learning Collaboratives
2013
  • Spread to 6 states Arizona, Florida, Indiana,
    Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri our newest partners!
  • Aligned with national guidelines
  • Focus on quality ECE, and childrens health as
    the foundation for life-long success
  • Obesity prevention in the context of health
    promotion and wellness made possible by the
    of providers

power
8
9
How can ECE providers be powerful?
  • Unique position to impact children and their
    families 8, 9
  • Influence on knowledge, attitudes and healthy
    habits 8, 9
  • Opportunities to create healthy environments 8, 9
  • Families often look to providers as a resource
    8, 9
  • We know you can make a difference!

9
10
The obesity epidemic impacts our children.
Together we can make a powerful difference.
  • Overweight and obesity increased rapidly in a
    relatively short period of time among children,
    youth and adults in the U.S. 10, 11, 12, 13
  • Increases were found in all regions of the
    country, urban and rural areas, both sexes, all
    racial and ethnic groups, all educational levels,
    rich and poor. 10, 11
  • Lets take a look at what has happened over 25
    years

11
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1985
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
12
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1987
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
13
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1989
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
14
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1991
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
15
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1993
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
16
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1995
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
17
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14 BRFSS, 1997
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
18
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 1999
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
19
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 2001
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
20
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 2003
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
21
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 2005
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
22
Obesity Trends Among U.S. Adults 14BRFSS, 2007
(BMI 30, or 30 lbs overweight for 5 4
person)
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
23
Obesity Trends Among U.S. AdultsBRFSS, 1990,
2000, 2010
(BMI ?30, or about 30 lbs. overweight for 54
person)
2000
1990
2010
No Data lt10 1014
1519 2024 2529
30
24
Arizona County-level Overweight/Obesity Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
25
Florida County-level Overweight/Obesity Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
26
Indiana County-level Overweight/Obesity Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
27
Kansas County-level Overweight/Obesity Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
28
Missouri County-level Overweight/Obesity
Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
29
New Jersey County-level Overweight/Obesity
Prevalence
Low-income, ages 2 to lt5 years (PedNSS 2009-11)
30
National Data
  • 27 of children ages 2-5 years are overweight or
    obese.16
  • 33 of Hispanic children ages 2-5 years are
    overweight or obese.16
  • 1 in 3 low-income, pre-school aged children is
    overweight or obese.16
  • Children who are overweight between ages 2-5
    years are 5 times more likely to be overweight at
    age 12 years.17

30
31
What health problems are associated with
childhood obesity?
31
32
Why are we so concerned about obesity?
  • Health problems in children formerly seen only in
    adults
  • Hypertension 6, 13
  • High Cholesterol 13, 18
  • Type 2 diabetes 6, 13
  • Hip and joint problems 6, 13
  • Serious long-term risks
  • Development of chronic diseases like diabetes,
    hypertension, cardio-vascular disease, asthma or
    sleep apnea 6, 13, 19
  • Shortened life expectancy 6, 13

32
33
Why are we so concerned about obesity?
  • Some children may face serious emotional/social
    stresses
  • Low self esteem 6, 13, 19
  • Negative body image 6, 13, 19
  • Depression 6, 13, 19
  • Teasing or bullying 13, 19
  • Discrimination 6, 13, 19
  • Healthy children are ready
    to explore and
    learn! 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9

33
34
Why do you think childhood obesity is on the
rise?
34
35
Changes in Our Society and Environment 13
  • More foods with high calories
  • Growth of the food industry and advertising
  • More meals away from home
  • Extraordinary portion sizes
  • Consumption of soda sweetened beverages
  • Calories in
  • Watching more TV
  • Less physical activity
  • More labor assisting devices
  • Lack of sidewalks
  • Automobile travel
  • Perception of safety
  • Calories out

35
36
The new social norm?
36
37
Screen time What do you see?
37
38
Our food environment sugar, salt and fat
38
39
Drive-through makes it easy
39
40
Food marketing to children
41
ABCs of a Healthy Me!
What can we do? How can we help?
42
ABCs of a Healthy Me
  • Active play
  • Every day, inside and out
  • Breastfeeding
  • Support and access to a private space
  • Cut down on screen time
  • None for children under age 2 years
  • No more than 30 minutes a week for children ages
    2 years and older
  • Drink milk and water
  • Offer milk at meals and make water always
    available to quench thirst
  • Eat only healthy foods
  • Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and
    protein, low-fat dairy

43
Active play, every day
  • Daily, indoors and out, for all children
  • Active play outdoors (2-3x)
  • Opportunities to practice age-appropriate motor
    and movement skills
  • Infants
  • Tummy time, several times, longer periods as
    tolerated
  • Toddlers
  • At least 60-90 minutes of active play
  • Preschoolers
  • At least 120 minutes of active play
  • Opportunities for breathless play

44
Benefits of physical activity in childhood 23, 28
  • Supports exploration, development and learning
  • Helps manage weight and maintain a healthy BMI
  • Builds and maintains healthy bones and muscles
  • Increases strength, coordination and fitness
  • Lowers risk of chronic diseases
  • Improves self esteem
  • Lowers stress

45
Are young children moving? 20
  • Most providers offer daily physical activity, but
    not enough moderate to vigorous physical activity
    (MVPA) 31
  • Children ages 3-5 years typically spent about
    20-25 min/day in moderate to vigorous activity.
    32
  • Over 50 of time was sedentary during a preschool
    day. 32, 33
  • Physical activity enhances attitude,
    attention,
    memory and learning. 35

46
Breastfeeding support 27
  • AAP recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the
    first 6 months and continued breastfeeding for a
    year or longer.
  • Reduced risk for chronic diseases
  • Developmental benefits
  • Maternal-infant bonding
  • Improved child and maternal health
  • ECE programs provide important support!
  • Access to a private, quiet, comfortable place to
    breastfeed or pump
  • Encouragement, support and information

47
Cut down on screen time
  • What is screen time?
  • TV
  • DVDs/videos
  • Computer time
  • No screen time for children under age 2 years
  • Limit or eliminate screen time for children
    ages 2 years and older
  • No more than 30 min/week in ECE setting
  • No more than 2 hours /day total from all sources

48
The links between screen time and obesity 22, 23
  • Increased snacking consumption of high caloric
    foods
  • Increased exposure to food and beverage
    advertising
  • Displacement of physical activity

49
Television and learning 24, 25, 26
  • For ages 8-16 month, viewing baby DVD/videos for
    1 hour daily was associated with 6-8 fewer words
    learned compared to those that did not watch
    them.
  • More TV viewing at age 3 years was associated
    with decreased cognitive test scores at age 6
    years.

50
Drink water or milk
  • Water is a great choice anytime
  • Should be visible and accessible for self-serve,
    inside and outside
  • Choose milk for meals
  • Whole milk for ages 12-24 months
  • 1 or fat-free milk for ages 2 years and older
  • Limit or eliminate fruit juice
  • 4-6 oz. per day (between home and ECE setting)
  • If offered, serve only 100 juice

51
No sugary drinks 23, 36, 37
  • Beverages that have added sugars
  • Sodas
  • Fruit drinks
  • Sweetened teas
  • Sports drinks
  • Contribute to childhood obesity.
  • Displace more nutritious drinks that children
    need to grow, like milk.
  • Contribute to dental cavities.

52
What percentage of young children have sugary
drinks every day? 21
Age in Months
53
Eat only healthy foods
  • Fruits and/or vegetables are served at every meal
    and snack
  • Fried/pre-fried foods are served only 1x/month or
    never
  • Make half of grains whole grains
  • Choose low-fat dairy (1 or fat-free)
  • Choose lean meats and protein

54
Why are fruits and vegetables so important? 20
  • May help your stomach feel full.
  • May help maintain a healthy weight.
  • May decrease chances of chronic diseases like
    diabetes, heart disease and cancer.
  • Help children develop life-long healthy habits.

55
Dietary patterns begin early 21
  • Almost 1/3 of infants and toddlers receive NO
    discrete fruit or vegetable daily.
  • French fries are 1 of 3 most common vegetables
    fed to infants ages 9-11 months.
  • By ages 15-18 months, French fries become the
    most common vegetable consumed.

56
You are the key to helping kids grow up healthy!
The healthy habits you model and teach will last
a lifetime!
57
Have fun being active with your children!
And remember we are here to help you on your
journey!
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