MEDIA LITERACY - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – MEDIA LITERACY PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 4b362d-ZDliY



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

MEDIA LITERACY

Description:

CORE CONCEPTS Media Literacy is a 21st century approach to education. Provides a framework to access, analyze, evaluate & create messages in a variety of forms from ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:1302
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 18
Provided by: blb4
Learn more at: http://cmsu2.ucmo.edu
Category:
Tags: literacy | media | media

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: MEDIA LITERACY


1
MEDIA LITERACY
  • CORE CONCEPTS

2
WHAT IS MEDIA LITERACY?
  • Media Literacy is a 21st century approach to
    education.
  • Provides a framework to access, analyze, evaluate
    create messages in a variety of forms from
    print to video to the Internet.
  • Builds an understanding of the role of media in
    society
  • Provides essential skills of inquiry and
    self-expression necessary for citizens of a
    democracy

3
DEFINITIONS OF MEDIA LITERACY
  • A perspective from which we expose ourselves to
    the media and interpret the meanings of the
    messages we encounter." (Potter, 2005, p. 22)
  • An understanding of the mass communication
    process through the development of critical
    thinking toolsthat enable a person to become
    more engaged as a citizen and more discerning as
    a consumer of mass media products (Campbell, et.
    al. 2009, p. G-8)
  • The skillful application of literacy skills to
    media and technology messages (AMLA, 2001).

4
KEY ISSUES (POTTER)
  • a. Information vs. knowledge
  • b. Exposure vs. attention
  • c. Automaticity vs. mindfulness
  • d. Meaning matching (usually routine and done
    automatically) vs. meaning construction (can be
    idiosyncratic and creative)

5
PROBLEMS/TRAPS (POTTER)
  • 1. We operate on automatic which creates traps
    that divert our attention
  • a. Information fatigue
  • b. A false feeling of being informed
  • c. A false sense of control
  • d. Faulty simplified beliefs
  • 1.  Exaggerate problems in society
  • 2.  Polarized beliefs in the effects of media
  • 3.  Abdication of personal responsibility
  • 2.  Media saturation contributes to these
    problems

6
Media literacy continuum
  • Ranges from Low literacy to high literacy
  • 1. Low literacya weak, limited perspective a
    "mindless" approach to media consumption with
    superficial reaction. 
  • 2.  High literacy--a highly developed
    perspective active, mindful approach to media
    consumption with a critical reaction. 
  • 3. Multidimensional--requires use of four
    domainscognitive, emotional, aesthetic, and
    moral (or value/ethical).

7
Five Core Concepts of Media Literacy
  • 1. All media messages are constructed.
  • 2. Media messages are constructed using a
    creative language with its own rules.
  • 3. Different people experience the same message
    differently.
  • 4. Media have embedded values and points of view.
  • 5. Media messages are constructed to gain profit
    and/or power.

8
Five Key Questions of Media Literacy
  • 1. Who created this message?
  • 2. What techniques are used to attract my
    attention?
  • 3. How might different people understand this
    message differently from me?
  • 4. What lifestyles, values, and points of view
    are represented in or omitted from this message?
  • 5. Why was this message sent?

9
Media Literacy Process Skills
  • DESCRIPTION
  • ANALYSIS
  • INTERPRETATION
  • EVALUATION
  • ENGAGEMENT
  • SEE ALSO POTTERS COGNITIVE MODEL (ON HANDOUT)

10
MEDIA LITERACY EMPOWERMENT SPIRAL (ALSO SEE
HANDOUT)
  • ACCESS
  • AWARENESS
  • ANALYSIS
  • EVALUATION
  • REFLECTION
  • ACTIVISM/ADVOCACY (COMMUNICATION

11
Other relevant concepts
  • A.  Ideology
  • 1. Comprehensive sets of ideas or beliefs about
    political and social life.
  •  2. disseminated through various social
    institutions such as the family, education,
    government, law, religion, media, etc.
  •  3. There can be competing ideologies within a
    single culture.

12
Definitions, cont.
  • B. Hegemony
  • 1. What we take for granted and accept without
    questions as natural
  • 2. Our common sense ideas about the nature of
    reality a world view.
  • 3. More pervasive abstract than ideology (as
    R. Williams notes, it saturates our lives).  
  •  4. Ubiquitous and amorphous, concerned with "our
    lived system of meanings and values" (Williams).

13
Definitions, cont.
  • C. Culture
  • 1. Social practices that both reflect and
    promote shared meanings
  • 2. Meaning occurs through the following
  • a. Discourses, or communication systems (verbal
    non-verbal symbols)
  • b. Institutions, such as family, education,
    religion, law, media, etc.
  • c. Norms and rules which provide prescriptions
    for behavior (which we reflect upon and decide to
    accept, modify, or reject)

14
Social Organization Theory /Cultural Norms Theory
(Cooley DeFleur)
 
  • 1.  Norms--general rules or proscriptions for a
    group (often codified)
  • 2.  Roles--specific norm-based positions within a
    group specialization of activity
  • 3.  Social System--interdependent synergistic
    system
  • 4.  Ranking--some members have more power
    status than others
  • 5.  Sanction--punish deviance reward compliance
    with norms, etc. for social control

15
Cultural Norms Theory, cont.
  •  6. Mass media is a major source of patterned
    social expectations for specific groups in
    society. 
  • 1 . Pattern is portrayed or represented
  • 2 . It is assimilated by members of a society or
    group
  • 3. It creates learned sets of social
    expectations
  • 4. Expectations provide guides to action in the
    larger society

16
Two views of culture
  • A. Culture as skyscraperculture organized into
    high, middle, low categories
  • 1. Associated with the Frankfurt School
  • 2. Praises high culture while condemning low, or
    popular culture
  • 3. Can be critiqued as too simplistic
  • B. Culture as a map
  • 1. Culture is seen as an on-going complex
    process that spreads out in multiple directions
  • 2. Depends heavily on stories
  • 3. We seek the familiar but also new adventures

17
AUDIENCE RESPONSES
  • According to Stuart Hall, audiences have 3 ways
    to decode any cultural message
  •  1. the preferred "reading" of a text--a "naive"
    decoding, in that you take it basically the way
    the creators intended.
  • 2. the negotiated reading--you take parts of the
    message, but adapt others to your own frame of
    reference.
  • 3. the oppositional or resistant (or critical)
    reader--you deconstruct the narrative, take it
    apart, argue with it, refuse to accept it as
    constructed.
About PowerShow.com