The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive research in a prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive research in a prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 4aecc4-NDlkM



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive research in a prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards

Description:

The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive research in a prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards Nicole Lucassen Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sophia ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:204
Avg rating:3.0/5.0

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive research in a prospective cohort study from fetal life onwards


1
The Generation R Study Behavioral and cognitive
research in a prospective cohort study from fetal
life onwards
  • Nicole Lucassen
  • Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Sophia
    Childrens Hospital, Erasmus MC,
    www.generationr.nl

2
Generation R study (Rotterdam, the Netherlands)
3

Design Generation R
  • Prospective cohort design
  • From early fetal life
  • Recruited from midwifery practices and hospitals
  • Urban, multi-ethnic population
  • 9.778 mothers and their unborn child
  • 65.8 of their partners participated

4
Generation R
  • Prospective cohort study from fetal life until
  • young adulthood. Primary research areas
  • 1) Behavioral and cognitive development
  • 2) Growth and physical development
  • 3) Diseases in childhood
  • 4) Health(care) for pregnant women and children

5
Ethnicity Generation R children
Based on classification according to the CBS,
2004. Missing 12
6

Design Generation RFocus Cohort
  • Detailed measures in the Focus Cohort
  • Homogeneous group both parents and grandparents
    are born in the Netherlands
  • Children born between Feb, 2003 Aug, 2005
  • 1.232 families 64,9 of fathers participated

7
Data collection flowchart
 Assessments in Generation R Cohort
Cord blood Birth weight Complications
Fetal Ultrasound Blood
Fetal Ultrasound
Neuromotor assessment Home observation
Fetal Ultrasound Urine
Father Questionnaire
Father Questionnaire
Question naire 7
Question naire 10
Question naire 11
Questio naire 6
Question naire 12
Question naire 14
Question naire 1
Question naire 3
Question naire 4
GenerationR _at_ age 5 Research center visit
12 weeks 20 weeks 30 weeks birth 2 months 6
months 12/14 months 18 months 24 months 3 yrs
4yrs
Home Visit father-child interaction, discipline
Additional Ultrasound Measures
Research Center visit 1 e.g. Brain ultra sound
Research Center visit 2 Neuromotor assessment
Research Center visit 3 e.g. Strange Situation
Research Center visit 5 e.g. Executive Functioning
Psychiatric Interview
 
8
Observational research Generation R Focus Cohort
  • 14 months lab visit parent-infant attachment,
    psychophysiological
  • measurements (blood sampling, cortisol)
  • (primary caregiver requested to participate 760
    mothers, 115 fathers)
  • 3 year lab visit parent-child interaction,
    parental disciplinary strategies,
  • childs compliance, emotion recognition, moral
    development
  • (primary caregiver requested to participate 753
    mothers, 107 fathers)
  • 4 year home visit father-child interaction,
    parental disciplinary
  • strategies, childs compliance, cognitive
    development, moral development,
  • mother-child interaction
  • (752 families)

9
Does the father matter?
  • The influence of paternal psychopathology and
    father-child interaction on behavior problems in
    preschool children

10
Family systems theory
  • Family systems theory describes the family as a
  • network of interconnected relationships in which
    the
  • whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
  • Accordingly, understanding a particular
    individual
  • within the family is not fully possible without
  • considering the network of relationships in which
  • that individual is embedded.

11
Family systems theory
  • Examples
  • Parental depression
  • Parental sensitivity

12
Family systems theory example depression
  • Parental depression lack of research on the role
    of
  • one parents depression in the other parents
  • depression

13
Family systems theory example depression
  • Paternal depression magnifies childrens risk
    for developing psychopathology when co-occurring
    with maternal depression (e.g. Marchand Hock,
    1998)
  • Nondepressed fathers are not a buffer for the
  • effects of maternal depression, even if
    fathers spend high amounts of time interacting
    with their
  • children (Mezulis et al., 2004)

14
Family systems theory example sensitivity
  • Sensitivity is defined as the ability to respond
  • appropriately and promptly to the signals of the
  • infant
  • (Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, Wall, 1978)

15
Family systems theory example sensitivity
  • Volling et al. (2002) no consistency in mothers
    and fathers sensitivity
  • Mothers are more sensitive with their infants
    than fathers

16
Family systems theory example sensitivity
  • Braungart-Rieker et al. (1999) modest to
    moderate
  • correlations in sensitivity to their infants.
  • Possible explanations
  • Parents hold same value systems with regard to
    responding sensitively
  • One parent models sensitive caregiving to the
    other parent
  • (Fox et al., 1991)

17
My research questions
  • Is paternal psychopathology related to
    behavior problems in young children?
  • Does negative father-child interaction
    increase the risk of behavioral problems in the
    child?
  • Can positive father-child interaction or
    paternal non-depression moderate the effect of
    maternal psychopathology on behavioral problems
    in children?
  • What factors predict fathers sensitivity and
    what is the association between fathers
    sensitivity and mothers sensitivity at the age
    of four?

18
Method
  • Generation R Focus Cohort
  • Information folder at age of 4 years
  • Appointment home visit when child is
  • 4 years 2 months
  • The main focus is on participation of father!
  • In case of divorce/split-up biological
    father as well as stepfather is recruited

19
Information folder for participants
20
15 students conducting the home visits

21
Response rate
  • Home visits performed 752
  • September 2007 December 2009
  • Response rate 76 of all eligible
    participants at the start
  • Top 3 reasons not to participate 1. Not
    interested 2. No time 3. Moved outside the
    country / inaccessible

22
4-year home visit overview of 10 tasks
  • Task 1 2 father-child interaction
  • Task 3 4 father-child interaction/parenting
  • Task 5 8 development of conscience
  • Task 6 development of working memory
  • Task 7 development of sustained
    attention
  • Task 9 10 mother-child interaction
  • Total duration of home visit 1,5 hours

23
Parent-child interaction
  • Teaching Tasks
  • Tasks that require interaction between child
  • and parent in a problem solving task
  • (Erickson, Sroufe Egeland, 1985)

24
Parent-child interaction Etch-a-Sketch

25
Parent-child interaction Etch-a-Sketch

26
Parent-child interaction Tower building
27
Parent-child interaction Tower building
28
Parental sensitivity
  • Supportive Presence reflects the extent to which
  • the parent expresses positive regard and
    emotional
  • and instructional support of the child
  • Intrusiveness refers to the degree to which the
  • parent lacks respect for the childs autonomy

29
Parent-child interaction (Etch a Sketch)
  • Insert scene father-child interaction

30
Paternal sensitivity Supportive Presence
  • 1. Father completely fails to be supportive to
    the child, either being aloof and unavailable or
    being hostile toward the child
  • 2. Father provides very little emotional support
    to the child
  • 3. Father gives some support, but it is sporadic
    and poorly timed to the childs needs
  • 4. This father does a respectable job of being
    available when his child needs support
  • 5. Father provides good support, reassurance and
    confidence in the childs ability, but he falters
    in this at times when the child especially could
    use more support
  • 6. Father establishes himself as supportive and
    encouraging toward the child but has some lapses
  • 7. Father skillfully provides support throughout
    the session

31
Parental sensitivity Intrusiveness
  • 1. The father allows the child sufficient time to
    explore and examine the environment, tools and
    parts
  • 2. The father generally intervenes appropriately
    but he may show subtle signs of being intrusive
  • 3. The father allows some time for exploration
    but steps in before the child seems to require
    help a few times
  • 4. There is a feeling of some intrusiveness that
    is easily or clearly picked up by the coders, but
    it is not pervasive
  • 5. There are clear signs that the father does not
    respect the childs needs and interests
  • 6. There are clear incidents of intrusiveness
    through out the session
  • 7. This father is highly intrusive. His agenda
    clearly has precedence over the childs wishes

32
Parent-child interaction (Etch a Sketch)
  • Insert scene mother-child interaction

33
Paternal sensitivity Supportive Presence
  • 1. Mother completely fails to be supportive to
    the child, either being aloof and unavailable or
    being hostile toward the child
  • 2. Mother provides very little emotional support
    to the child
  • 3. Mother gives some support, but it is sporadic
    and poorly timed to the childs needs
  • 4. This mother does a respectable job of being
    available when her child needs support
  • 5. Mother provides good support, reassurance and
    confidence in the childs ability, but she
    falters in this at times when the child
    especially could use more support
  • 6. Mother establishes herself as supportive and
    encouraging toward the child but has some lapses
  • 7. Mother skillfully provides support throughout
    the session

34
Parental sensitivity Intrusiveness
  • 1. The mother allows the child sufficient time to
    explore and examine the environment, tools and
    parts
  • 2. The mother generally intervenes appropriately
    but she may show subtle signs of being intrusive
  • 3. The mother allows some time for exploration
    but steps in before the child seems to require
    help a few times
  • 4. There is a feeling of some intrusiveness that
    is easily or clearly picked up by the coders, but
    it is not pervasive
  • 5. There are clear signs that the mother does not
    respect the childs needs and interests
  • 6. There are clear incidents of intrusiveness
    through out the session
  • 7. This mother is highly intrusive. Her agenda
    clearly has precedence over the childs wishes

35
  • With special thanks to all the participants of
    the
  • Generation R study and to my supervisors
  • Mijke P. van den Berg
  • Henning Tiemeier
  • Frank C. Verhulst
  • Marinus H. van IJzendoorn (Leiden University)
  • Marian J. Bakermans-Kranenburg (Leiden
    University)
About PowerShow.com