Meeting the Online Learning Requirement: REMC/GenNET Online Learning Project MASA Conference January 2007 Beverly Knox-Pipes, Asst. Superintendent Genesee Intermediate School District/REMC 14 Ricki Chowning, Executive Director REMC Association of - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Meeting the Online Learning Requirement: REMC/GenNET Online Learning Project MASA Conference January 2007 Beverly Knox-Pipes, Asst. Superintendent Genesee Intermediate School District/REMC 14 Ricki Chowning, Executive Director REMC Association of

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Title: Meeting the Online Learning Requirement: REMC/GenNET Online Learning Project MASA Conference January 2007 Beverly Knox-Pipes, Asst. Superintendent Genesee Intermediate School District/REMC 14 Ricki Chowning, Executive Director REMC Association of


1
Meeting the Online Learning Requirement
REMC/GenNETOnline Learning ProjectMASA
ConferenceJanuary 2007Beverly Knox-Pipes,
Asst. SuperintendentGenesee Intermediate School
District/REMC 14Ricki Chowning, Executive
DirectorREMC Association of Michigan
2
Transforming LearningThrough Technology
  • Advance a forwardlooking vision
  • Bring the vision to life in schools
  • Require accountability for investments in
    learning technology
  • Leverage resources
  • Build on quality and commitment of educators

3
A Little Perspective
  • The Internet had more users in its first five
    years than the telephone did in its first thirty
  • Text messaging outnumbers e-mail,
  • Email outnumbers regular mail by nearly ten to
    one
  • The web is still doubling in sizeevery 60 days
  • A new web page appears every 2 minutes

4
A Little Perspective
  • From a UCLA study (2000)
  • By 1997, some 19 million Americans were using the
    Internet. That number tripled in one year, and
    then passed 100 million in 1999.
  • In the first quarter of 2000, more than five
    million Americans joined the online worldroughly
    55,000 new users each day, 2,289 new users each
    hour, or 38 new users each minute

Chip Kimball, Lake Washington Schools, 2005
5
A Little Perspective
  • According to the U.S. Congress Web Based
    Education Commission (2000)
  • It is estimated that 50 of all employees skills
    become outdated within 3 to 5 years
  • what counts most for instructional purposes is
    classroom connectivity, providing student access
    to Internet connections where they learnin the
    classroom
  • Learning environments should be centered around
    knowledge, learners, social inter-actions, and
    assessment

Chip Kimball, Lake Washington Schools, 2005
6
What Teenagers Do Online
Email
Surf for fun
Play games
Instant message
Rock stars
Pictures
Health info
Pursue hobbies
Research products
News
Listen to music
TV stars
Download music
Chat rooms
Sports news
Calendar
My teams sites
Auction/trading
Buy products
My own site
Sensitive topics
7
What Teenagers Do Online
Homework
Major researchprojects
Access classWeb sites
Email / IMteachers
Downloadstudy aids
Create classWeb page
8
What Teens Do More Than Adults
Source Peter Grunwald Associates Corporation
for Public Broadcasting Survey, January 2003
9
A Little Perspective
  • Oct 24,1997 A report from FIND/SVP has revealed
  • 36 percent of parents believe that using the
    Internet will increase employment prospects
  • By the year 2002, 45 million children online
  • 2005the one-billionth user got on line

10
Who is the N-Gen?
  • Two-thirds of kids today use a personal computer
  • All digital technologies are moving towards the
    net
  • Teenage Research Institute - in to be online
  • On par with dating and partying

11
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12
Students Internet Metaphors
  • The Internet as virtual textbook and reference
    library
  • The Internet as virtual tutor and study shortcut
  • The Internet as virtual study group
  • The Internet as virtual guidance counselor
  • The Internet as virtual locker, backpack and
    notebook

Source Peter Grunwald Associates Corporation
for Public Broadcasting Survey, January 2003
13
Digital Age Shifts in Learning
  • TEXT TEXT
    IMAGE
  • INFORMATION
  • NAVIGATION
  • BEING TOLD
  • (authority based)
  • DEDUCTIVE
  • (linear)
  • DONT KNOW
  • WONT TRY
  • RICH MEDIA
  • DISCOVERY, EXPERIENTIAL
  • BRICOLAGE JUDGMENT
  • (lateral)
  • DONT KNOW LINK, LURK TRY

John Seely Brown, Social Life of Information
14
Voice Video Data
Fiber Optics
15
Improving Outcomes for High School Students
  • Governor Jennifer M. Granholm signed into law a
    rigorous new set of statewide graduation
    requirementsApril 20, 2006

16
Overview of Michigan Merit Curriculum
  • 2011 Requirements (2006 8th grade class)
  • 4 English Language Arts
  • 4 Mathematics (1 in senior year)
  • 3 Science
  • 3 Social Studies
  • 1 Physical Education/Health
  • 1 Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts
  • On-line course/experience
  • 2016 Requirements (2006 3rd grade class)
  • 2 credits/experience in Languages other than
    English

17
Why Economic Survival?
  • Our students face both national and international
    competition
  • Research shows many students are not prepared to
    succeed in college or workplace
  • Courses like Algebra II are new gateway to higher
    paying jobs
  • Michigans economic success is tied to a
    well-educated workforce

18
Michigan High School Graduation Requirements
In the 21st Century, the ability to be a
lifelong learner will, for many people, be
dependent on their ability to access and benefit
from online learning. The experience of online
learning must be integrated into each and every
students high school education! -Superintenden
t of Schools, Michael FlanaganAugust 2006
19
Successful High School Programs
  • High expectations
  • Rigorous requirements
  • Academic studies applied to real-world situations
    and projects
  • Challenging career/technical studies
  • Work-based learning opportunities

20
District Modification
  • District must make available opportunities to
    meet all graduation requirements by beginning of
    2007-08 school year (when next years 8th graders
    enter 9th grade)
  • If not available in the district itself, other
    arrangements such as
  • Co-op agreements with neighboring district(s)
  • Online options
  • Dual enrollment
  • Distance learning

21
The Michigan Merit Curriculum Guidelines for
Online Learning Require that Students
  • Take an online course or
  • Participate in an online experience or
  • Participate in online experiences incorporated
    into each of the required credit courses of the
    Michigan Merit Curriculum

22
For the earning experience to be successful it
should
  • Be relevant and address many learning styles
    appropriate to the tasks
  • Include asynchronous and/or synchronous
    interaction between teacher and student, and
    student-to-student
  • Include teachers who are knowledgeable in
    web-based instruction techniques
  • Incorporate resources outside the classroom
    Include a monitoring plan

23
Partnership
24
The Goal of Partnership
  • Equip Michigan school districts with a variety of
    cost-effective course options from eight vendors
    to meet and enhance curriculum standards and
    needs in Michigan schools.

25
Benefits
  • Knowledge and expertise is provided by
    GenNET/Genesee ISD, who have been leading an
    online project for the past six years.

26
http//www.gennet.us
27
Online Course Providers
28
Registrants by Vendor
29
Benefits
  • Provides quality services to local school
    districts and students using the most
    cost-effective methods to meet the new high
    school graduation requirements.

30
Benefits
  • By working collaboratively, REMCs/ISDs can
    leverage statewide and multi-state buying power
    for quality online learning experiences/courses.

31
Benefits
  • Using a variety of online providers enables
    schools to enhance local curriculum opportunities
    and more importantly supports diverse learning
    styles.
  • Access to quality online resources and classroom
    support tools is also provided.

32
Benefits
  • The project was originally launched through
    collaboration with LEAs (high school principals
    and guidance counselors).

33
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34
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35
Courses Available
  • Over 600 teacher-led course offerings for High
    School and Middle School students including
  • General Education
  • Honors
  • Advanced Placement
  • Credit Recovery

36
Sample General Ed. Courses
  • Health Occupations
  • Japanese
  • Oceanography
  • Psychology
  • Spanish
  • and many more!
  • Accounting
  • American Government
  • American Literature
  • Applied Math
  • Business Law
  • German

37
Sample Advanced Placement Courses
  • AP Physics C
  • AP Psychology
  • AP Statistics
  • AP U.S. History
  • AP Biology
  • AP Calculus AB BC
  • AP Chemistry
  • AP Economics
  • AP Government Politics U.S. Comparative

38
Sample Honors Courses
  • Literary Analysis
  • Nonfiction Writing
  • Physics
  • Shakespeare
  • U.S. History
  • World History
  • Algebra
  • Biology
  • Creative Writing
  • Earth Science
  • Economics
  • English Vocabulary
  • Journalistic Writing

39
Sample Credit Recovery Courses
  • English
  • Geometry
  • Health
  • Life Science
  • Physical Science
  • Pre-Algebra
  • World History
  • American Government
  • Algebra
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Civics
  • Earth Science
  • Economics

40
Classroom Support Tools
  • Course Preparation Materials
  • Interactive Practice Exams (AP, ACT, SAT, etc.)
  • Self-paced Cyberlearning

41
ISDs/RESAs/REMCs How to Participate
  • Interested districts contact local ISD/RESA/REMC
    Director
  • The Project Director contact
  • Beverly Knox-Pipes, Asst. Supt.
  • Genesee ISD
  • (810) 591-4436 or bknoxpip_at_geneseeisd.org

42
How to Register Students
  • Students must register through local high school
    and middle school guidance counselors.

43
Presenter Contact Info.
  • Beverly Knox-Pipes
  • Assistant Superintendent for
  • Technology Media Services
  • Genesee Intermediate School District
  • 2413 West Maple Avenue
  • Flint, MI 48507-3493
  • Phone (810) 591-4436
  • bknoxpip_at_geneseeisd.org
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