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AIRS/UWW Disaster Response Team

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AIRS/UWW Disaster Response Team September 14, 2010 What did we learn? Be prepared with a written Emergency Operations Plan; Have practice meetings consistently during ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: AIRS/UWW Disaster Response Team


1
AIRS/UWW Disaster Response Team

September 14, 2010
2
Mission Statement
  • To increase the capacity of the
  • Information and Referral field
  • to respond to Disasters

3
Vision Statement
  • AIRS UWW will increase the capacity of the
    Information and Referral field to respond to
    disasters by establishing a Disaster Response
    Team consisting of trained professionals who can
    establish or supplement a call center during
    times of Disaster and provide training to the
    field during non-disaster times.

4
DRT History
  • Hurricanes Katrina Rita
  • After Action Report Findings/Recommendations
  • UWWs National Professional Council
  • AIRS/UWW Partnership
  • Past Deployments

5
Disaster Strikes
  • Local IR or 2-1-1 evaluates capacity
  • Formal request submitted to DRT Leadership
  • Assessment
  • Of the disaster
  • Of the needs
  • Of our ability to respond
  • MOU signed

6
DRT Mobilization
  • First wave of DRT identified
  • DRT Emergency Coordinator first on scene to
    prepare
  • Team members deployed w/in 24 - 48hrs of decision
  • DRT Logistics staff will work with local staff on
    housing transportation

7
On-site
  • DRT Emergency Coordinator local staff Chain of
    Command identified
  • Communication structure processes identified
  • DRT members arrive supplement local staff needs
  • DRT Emergency Coordinator local staff determine
    needs for Second Wave of DRT members

8
Exit Strategy
  • Review of exit thresholds after daily debriefings
    with local staff
  • Discuss transition plan with local staff

9
After Action
  • Evaluation of DRT response from requesting agency
  • Create after action report

10
Rx Response
  • Disaster Webinar
  • September 14, 2010

Presented By Charlene Hipes COO, AIRS
11
What is RX Response
  • Rx Response was developed as an initiative of
    Americas pharmaceutical supply system in 2007 to
    help ensure the availability
  • of medicine to patients during a severe public
    health emergency.
  • Rx Response acts as a single point of contact for
    the entire
  • pharmaceutical supply system and federal and
    state emergency
  • management officials to communicate
    pharmaceutical needs and
  • other issues which may impact the supply system.
  • The communications are actively monitored by all
    segments of
  • the pharmaceutical supply system to ensure the
    fastest possible resolution.

12
Who are the Primary Rx Response Members
  • Manufactures
  • Distributors
  • Dispensers/Pharmacies
  • Disaster/Relief Organizations
  • Federal, state and local government parties that
    respond to disasters, while not part of the
    Coordinating Body, play a key role.
  • Non-Profits, such as AIRS and United Way
    Worldwide assisted with the training material and
    getting the word out.

13
History/Motivation for Creation
  • The program was initiated by the Pharmaceutical
    Research and Manufacturers of America in the
    aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and based on fears
    of a new pandemic outbreak in 2005.
  • Following Hurricane Katrina, there was no single
    point of contact for emergency managers and
    relief agencies to contact the pharmaceutical
    supply system.

14
What is the Real Benefit
  • In the event of a severe public health emergency
    or disaster, one of the many critical factors in
    preserving and protecting public health will be
    continued access to essential medicines for
    treatment of injuries or illness caused by the
    event, as well as continued supply of medicines
    for patients. 
  • First and foremost, the program helps
    communication between first responders and relief
    workers and those involved in the pharmaceutical
    supply system during an emergency or disaster.

15
Emergency Pharmacy Status Reporting
  • There is no benefit to an operational
    pharmaceutical supply system if those in need
    cannot get or do not know where to get their
    medications. It is critical that the general
    public be able to locate nearby open pharmacies
    in a disaster or emergency event.
  • To meet this need, Rx Response partnered with the
    National Council for Prescription Drug Programs
    (NCPDP), as well as the pharmacy
    switches/clearinghouses responsible for
    processing pharmacy payments eRx Network (an
    Emdeon company) and RelayHealth. These
    partnerships form the basis of the Emergency
    Pharmacy Status Reporting tool.

16
Emergency Pharmacy Status Reporting
  • Once a request is made by a state emergency or
    public health official to begin pharmacy status
    reporting, Rx Response requests a list of all
    NCPDP pharmacies within an affected disaster
    area. At the same time, Rx Response requests that
    the pharmacy switches/clearinghouses begin
    providing a daily list of all pharmacies that are
    billing within the affected area.
  • The data is then merged and filtered to display
    only those zip codes listed within disaster
    declarations. Once the data is processed, Rx
    Response displays both a graphical, searchable
    map and downloadable Excel file of all known
    pharmacies (displayed on the map using orange
    icons), all open pharmacies (green icons), and
    any known affected/closed pharmacies (red icons).
    The images below show examples of these icons and
    what the map may look like if activated for an
    affected region.

17
Who might find the Rx ResponsePharmacy Status
Reporting Tool useful?
  • Anyone who needs medicine in a disaster area
  • Emergency rooms, acute care clinics and
    physicians offices for patient referrals
  • Pharmaceutical distributors and manufacturers
  • Emergency management and public health officials

18
Can I narrow my search to find apharmacy in my
neighborhood?
  • Yes. Users can narrow their search by providing
    information
  • such as a zip code or street address within
    their city, county or
  • state. The reporting tool will automatically
    compile a list of the
  • nearest open pharmacies based on the address
    where a person
  • is located. The open pharmacy locations will be
    provided as an
  • excel spreadsheet to emergency managers and in
    map format
  • for emergency managers and consumers on the
  • RxResponse.org website.

19
How To Contact Them
  • If you cannot find specific information on our
    website, feel free to send a request for
    information to the Rx Response operations center,
    located at PhRMA's headquarters in Washington
    D.C.  In addition, feel free to call or fax the
    numbers below, or send an email to
    contactus_at_rxresponse.org.
  • Rx Responsec/o PhRMA
  • 950 F Street, NWSuite 300Washington, DC
    20004Phone (202) 835-3400Fax (202) 835-3414

20
UWW/AIRS Link Line
United Way StaffToll-free Check-In Number
1.877.UWA.LINK1.877.892.5465Now available to
United Ways and 2-1-1s across the U.S.,Canada
and throughout the Caribbean.
21
Presenter
Jay Wilkes Manager, Disaster Services United Way
Worldwide Formerly Director, Crisis
Preparedness, Response and Recovery United Way of
the Bay Area www.linkedin.com/in/jpwilkes
703.836.7112, x239 jay.wilkes_at_uww.unitedway.org

21
22
DisasterAssistance.gov helps disaster survivors
  • Find help in Spanish and English for
    individuals, family, or business during all
    stages of an emergency
  • Learn what help might be available from 17 U.S.
    Government agencies
  • Have Social Security benefits sent to a new
    address
  • Find federal disaster recovery centers near a
    current address
  • Get help from the Department of State if
    affected by a disaster while living or traveling
    outside the U.S
  • Apply online for help from FEMA
  • Be referred to the Small Business
    Administration for loans

22
23
Resources for Your Readinesswww.Do1Thing.us
  • The mission of do1thing is to move individuals,
    families, organizations, businesses, and
    communities to prepare for all hazards and become
    disaster resilient.

September - Getting Emergency Information THE
GOAL Make sure everyone in your household can
receive, understand, and act on information
received in an emergency.
  • Do One Thing (choose one thing to do this month)
  • Purchase an Emergency Alert Radio.
  • Make sure everyone in your household knows what
    to do when outdoor warning sirens sound.
  • Create a personal support network to meet any
    special needs.
  • Create a plan with a neighbor to care for your
    pets if you can't get home in a disaster.

23
23
24
Agency Emergency Plan A Simplified Version for
Community-Based Organizations
  • A. Disaster Mission Statement
  • Make sure you know what role you are planning to
    play in a disaster
  • Who are you going to be for your clients and
    community when disaster strikes?
  • Does your current mission statement encompass
    how you see your agency functioning in a
    disaster?
  • Think about your commitments and your resource
    limitations and create a disaster mission
    statement.

www.sfcard.org
24
25
Agency Emergency Plan A Simplified Version for
Community-Based Organizations
  • D. Volunteers Make sure you know the best ways
    to use and work with volunteers in a disaster
  • Know how you will appropriately recruit, task and
    manage volunteers.
  • 1. Are your current volunteers appropriate for
    disaster related work?
  • 2. Do your current practices of recruiting or
    accepting volunteers include your disaster
    preparedness and response needs?
  • 3. What important activities (that keep your
    organization able to provide services) can be
    assigned to spontaneous volunteers? What
    activities should not be assigned to spontaneous
    volunteers?
  • 4. What safety and/or legal considerations should
    you include in your plan?

25
26
Communicating with Our Partners Tools for
Sustained Action!
  • Flow You ?Your Organization ?Your Community
    ?Beyond!
  • Transform the entire crisis communication and
    emergency preparedness conversation .

26
26
27
Sample Messaging
STAT - Safety Team Action Tools5-Minute
Messages Take just five minutes a week to raise
the level of emergency preparedness and safety
awareness in your organization and community
organizations you serve. This Week Flexing
Your Communications Muscles
27
27
28
Agenda
  • United Way of the Bay Area and Hurricane Gustav
  • Learnings from Gustav

28
29
Hurricane Gustav and Its Aftermath
  • TWO MILLION EVACUATED

29
30
30
31
TWO MILLION EVACUATED
TWO MILLION RETURNED HOME
thats when the problems started
31
32
2-1-1 San Francisco MobilizedUWBA 2-1-1 asked to
serve as an overflow call center
  • UWBA asked because of our
  • PEOPLE staff sprang into
    action
  • PLANNING built
    emergency capacity
  • PARTNERSHIPS CA Coalition of 2-1-1

32
33
Answering the CallTripled our capacity almost
overnight
  • Transformed conference room into Hurricane Gustav
    call center
  • Tripled our capacity
  • 7 to 24 phone lines
  • Trained 50 people
  • Developed new crisis protocols
  • Simple scripts
  • Updates on easel pads

33
34
Lending Assistance to the Gulf Coast
  • 1,700 calls at 2-1-1 UWBA
  • 40,000 nationwide
  • 550 staff hours on phones
  • Call volume spiked as evacuees returned home

34
35
What were the top caller needs?
very basic needs
cash, food, shelter, water,
transportation
35
36
No infrastructure for returning residents
shelter locations in New Orleans
NO shelters NO sewage NO water NO food NO
gas NO electricity
only 36 out of 64 perishes declared a disaster
36
37
The Power of Electricity Almost 1 Million
without power upon return
  • NO
  • No ATMs
  • No automatic
  • deposits social security, unemployment,
    paychecks

NO

power
  • No online apps for services - FEMA
  • Prescriptions
  • Phone chargers

NO
N O
NO Water
  • Electric pumps

YES electrical fires when power restored
NO
37
38
After evacuees were allowed to return home
  • how many government
    service agencies were open?

38
39
NONE
no food stamps, social security checks,
unemployment checks no services for the neediest
residents
39
40
How many non-profits were open as
people returned home?
severely underfunded spent 70M, raised 5M
40
41
Nonprofits not availableAffected by hurricane
themselves
No services for hidden populations
  • Limited English Proficiencies
  • Recent immigrants/migrants
  • Renters and large households
  • Large concentrations of youth
  • The homeless
  • Tourists and transients
  • Residents of group living facilities
  • Elderly, particularly frail elderly
  • People with physical or mental disabilities
  • Low-income households
  • Single-parent families

41
42
  • TWO MILLION EVACUATED

TWO MILLION RETURNED HOME
thats when the problems started
FOCUS on EVACUTION not RETURN HOME REACTIVE to
KATRINA not PROACTIVE WHAT IS EXPECTED
not WHAT IS REQUIRED
42
43
What did we learn?
  • Be prepared with a written Emergency Operations
    Plan
  • Have practice meetings consistently during
    non-crisis periods of time
  • Partner with other departments in your United
    Way
  • Partner with other organizations i.e. 2-1-1
    Call Centers, Volunteer Centers, VOAD/COADs,
    etc.
  • Partner with key constituents in the private
    sector i.e. Google for maps, computer vendors,
    etc.
  • Work quickly, stay organized
  • Document work i.e. sign-in lists for
    volunteers, copies of trainings, etc.
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