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Hamlet Review

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Hamlet Review Speaker: Good now, sit down, and tell me, he that knows, Why this same strict and most observant watch So nightly toils the subject of the land, And why ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Hamlet Review


1
Hamlet Review
2
Speaker
  • Good now, sit down, and tell me, he that
    knows, Why this same strict and most observant
    watch So nightly toils the subject of the
    land, And why such daily cast of brazen
    cannon, And foreign mart for implements of
    war Why such impress of shipwrights, whose sore
    task Does not divide the Sunday from the
    week What might be toward, that this sweaty
    haste Doth make the night joint-labourer with the
    day Who is't that can inform me?

3
Speaker
  • At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him Be
    you and I behind an arras then Mark the
    encounter

4
Who is you?
  • At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him Be
    you and I behind an arras then Mark the
    encounter

5
Who is him?
  • At such a time I'll loose my daughter to him Be
    you and I behind an arras then Mark the
    encounter

6
Speaker
  • And, England, if my love thou hold'st at
    aught-- As my great power thereof may give thee
    sense, Since yet thy cicatrice looks raw and
    red After the Danish sword, and thy free awe Pays
    homage to us--thou mayst not coldly set Our
    sovereign process which imports at full, By
    letters congruing to that effect, The present
    death of Hamlet. Do it, England For like the
    hectic in my blood he rages, And thou must cure
    me till I know 'tis done, Howe'er my haps, my
    joys were ne'er begun.

7
Speaker
  • Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some
    craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the
    event, A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one
    part wisdom And ever three parts coward, I do not
    know Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to
    do' Sith I have cause and will and strength and
    means To do't.

8
The theme is
  • Now, whether it be Bestial oblivion, or some
    craven scruple Of thinking too precisely on the
    event, A thought which, quarter'd, hath but one
    part wisdom And ever three parts coward, I do not
    know Why yet I live to say 'This thing's to
    do' Sith I have cause and will and strength and
    means To do't.
  • A. disguise B. madness
  • C. indecision

9
Who is described?
  • 'Twere good she were spoken with for she may
    strew Dangerous conjectures in ill-breeding
    minds.

10
Speaker
  • Give me your pardon, sir I've done you
    wrong But pardon't, as you are a gentleman. This
    presence knows, And you must needs have heard,
    how I am punish'd With sore distraction.

11
Who is spoken to
  • Give me your pardon, sir I've done you
    wrong But pardon't, as you are a gentleman. This
    presence knows, And you must needs have heard,
    how I am punish'd With sore distraction.

12
Speaker
  • Thus conscience does make cowards of us all And
    thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied
    o'er with the pale cast of thought, And
    enterprises of great pith and moment With this
    regard their currents turn awry, And lose the
    name of action.

13
Who is described?
  • I tell thee she is and therefore make her
    grave straight the crowner hath sat on her, and
    finds it Christian burial.

14
The theme of this quote is
  • Thus conscience does make cowards of us all And
    thus the native hue of resolution Is sicklied
    o'er with the pale cast of thought, And
    enterprises of great pith and moment With this
    regard their currents turn awry, And lose the
    name of action.
  • A. revenge B. madness
  • C. disguise D. indecision

15
Speaker
  • for love of grace, Lay not that mattering unction
    to your soul, That not your trespass, but my
    madness speaks It will but skin and film the
    ulcerous place, Whilst rank corruption, mining
    all within, Infects unseen.

16
Who is spoken to
  • for love of grace, Lay not that mattering unction
    to your soul, That not your trespass, but my
    madness speaks It will but skin and film the
    ulcerous place, Whilst rank corruption, mining
    all within, Infects unseen.

17
Speaker
  • To-morrow is Saint Valentine's day, All in the
    morning betime, And I a maid at your window, To
    be your Valentine. Then up he rose, and donn'd
    his clothes, And dupp'd the chamber-door Let in
    the maid, that out a maid Never departed more.

18
Speaker
  • Sir, in my heart there was a kind of
    fighting, That would not let me sleep methought
    I lay Worse than the mutines in the bilboes.
    Rashly, And praised be rashness for it, let us
    know, Our indiscretion sometimes serves us
    well, When our deep plots do pall and that
    should teach us There's a divinity that shapes
    our ends, Rough-hew them how we will,--

19
Who is spoken to
  • Sir, in my heart there was a kind of
    fighting, That would not let me sleep methought
    I lay Worse than the mutines in the bilboes.
    Rashly, And praised be rashness for it, let us
    know, Our indiscretion sometimes serves us
    well, When our deep plots do pall and that
    should teach us There's a divinity that shapes
    our ends, Rough-hew them how we will,--

20
Speaker
  • Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio a
    fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy
    he hath borne me on his back a thousand times
    and now, how abhorred in my imagination it is! my
    gorge rims at it.

21
Speaker
  • was your father dear to you? Or are you like the
    painting of a sorrow, A face without a heart?

22
Who is you?
  • was your father dear to you? Or are you like the
    painting of a sorrow, A face without a heart?

23
Who is father?
  • was your father dear to you? Or are you like the
    painting of a sorrow, A face without a heart?

24
Speaker
  • nor have we herein barr'd Your better wisdoms,
    which have freely gone With this affair along.
    For all, our thanks.

25
Speaker
  • Why, then, 'tis none to you for there is
    nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it
    so

26
Who is spoken to
  • Why, then, 'tis none to you for there is
    nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it
    so

27
Speaker
  • I have heard of your paintings too, well enough
    God has given you one face, and you make
    yourselves another you jig, you amble, and you
    lisp, and nick-name God's creatures, and make
    your wantonness your ignorance.

28
Who is spoken to?
  • I have heard of your paintings too, well enough
    God has given you one face, and you make
    yourselves another you jig, you amble, and you
    lisp, and nick-name God's creatures, and make
    your wantonness your ignorance.

29
This quote describes
  • I have heard of your paintings too, well enough
    God has given you one face, and you make
    yourselves another you jig, you amble, and you
    lisp, and nick-name God's creatures, and make
    your wantonness your ignorance.
  • A. murderers B. deceivers
  • C. women D. kings

30
Speaker
  • Seems,nay it is I know not 'seems.' 'Tis not
    alone my inky cloak, Nor customary suits of
    solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forced
    breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the
    eye, Nor the dejected 'havior of the
    visage, Together with all forms, moods, shapes of
    grief, That can denote me truly these indeed
    seem, For they are actions that a man might
    play But I have that within which passeth
    show These but the trappings and the suits of
    woe.

31
Who is spoken to?
  • Seems,nay it is I know not 'seems.' 'Tis not
    alone my inky cloak, Nor customary suits of
    solemn black, Nor windy suspiration of forced
    breath, No, nor the fruitful river in the
    eye, Nor the dejected 'havior of the
    visage, Together with all forms, moods, shapes of
    grief, That can denote me truly these indeed
    seem, For they are actions that a man might
    play But I have that within which passeth
    show These but the trappings and the suits of
    woe.

32
Speaker
  • O, that this too too solid flesh would melt Thaw
    and resolve itself into a dew! Or that the
    Everlasting had not fix'd His canon 'gainst
    self-slaughter! O God! God! How weary, stale,
    flat and unprofitable, Seem to me all the uses of
    this world!

33
In this quote the speaker wishes to
  • O, that this too too solid flesh would melt Thaw
    and resolve itself into a dew! Or that the
    Everlasting had not fix'd His canon 'gainst
    self-slaughter!
  • A. run away B. kill somebody
  • C. kill himself or herself

34
Speaker
  • Frailty, thy name is woman!--

35
Who is described
  • Frailty, thy name is woman!--

36
Speaker
  • For and the trifling of his favour, Hold it a
    fashion and a toy in blood, A violet in the youth
    of primy nature, Forward, not permanent, sweet,
    not lasting, The perfume and suppliance of a
    minute No more.

37
Who is described
  • For and the trifling of his favour, Hold it a
    fashion and a toy in blood, A violet in the youth
    of primy nature, Forward, not permanent, sweet,
    not lasting, The perfume and suppliance of a
    minute No more.

38
Speaker
  • Perhaps he loves you now, And now no soil nor
    cautel doth besmirch The virtue of his will but
    you must fear, His greatness weigh'd, his will is
    not his own For he himself is subject to his
    birth He may not, as unvalued persons do, Carve
    for himself for on his choice depends The safety
    and health of this whole state And therefore
    must his choice be circumscribed Unto the voice
    and yielding of that body Whereof he is the head.

39
Who is described
  • Perhaps he loves you now, And now no soil nor
    cautel doth besmirch The virtue of his will but
    you must fear, His greatness weigh'd, his will is
    not his own For he himself is subject to his
    birth He may not, as unvalued persons do, Carve
    for himself for on his choice depends The safety
    and health of this whole state And therefore
    must his choice be circumscribed Unto the voice
    and yielding of that body Whereof he is the head.

40
Who is spoken to
  • Perhaps he loves you now, And now no soil nor
    cautel doth besmirch The virtue of his will but
    you must fear, His greatness weigh'd, his will is
    not his own For he himself is subject to his
    birth He may not, as unvalued persons do, Carve
    for himself for on his choice depends The safety
    and health of this whole state And therefore
    must his choice be circumscribed Unto the voice
    and yielding of that body Whereof he is the head.

41
Speaker
  • Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me
    the steep and thorny way to heaven Whiles, like
    a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the
    primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not
    his own rede.

42
Who is described
  • Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me
    the steep and thorny way to heaven Whiles, like
    a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the
    primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not
    his own rede.

43
This quote means
  • Do not, as some ungracious pastors do, Show me
    the steep and thorny way to heaven Whiles, like
    a puff'd and reckless libertine, Himself the
    primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not
    his own rede.
  • A. dont lie B. dont be a hypocrite
  • C. dont be a preacher

44
Speaker
  • Ay, springes to catch woodcocks. I do know, When
    the blood burns, how prodigal the soul Lends the
    tongue vows these blazes, Giving more light
    than heat, extinct in both, Even in their
    promise, as it is a-making, You must not take for
    fire.

45
Who is spoken to
  • Ay, springes to catch woodcocks. I do know, When
    the blood burns, how prodigal the soul Lends the
    tongue vows these blazes, Giving more light
    than heat, extinct in both, Even in their
    promise, as it is a-making, You must not take for
    fire.

46
Speaker
  • Not this, by no means, that I bid you do Let the
    bloat king tempt you again to bed Pinch wanton
    on your cheek call you his mouse And let him,
    for a pair of reechy kisses, Or paddling in your
    neck with his damn'd fingers, Make you to ravel
    all this matter out, That I essentially am not in
    madness, But mad in craft.

47
Who is spoken to
  • Not this, by no means, that I bid you do Let the
    bloat king tempt you again to bed Pinch wanton
    on your cheek call you his mouse And let him,
    for a pair of reechy kisses, Or paddling in your
    neck with his damn'd fingers, Make you to ravel
    all this matter out, That I essentially am not in
    madness, But mad in craft.

48
Speaker
  • For _____, Believe so much in him, that he is
    young And with a larger tether may he walk Than
    may be given you.

49
Who is described in the underlined words?
  • For _____, Believe so much in him, that he is
    young And with a larger tether may he walk Than
    may be given you.

50
Who is spoken to (underlined word)?
  • For _____, Believe so much in him, that he is
    young And with a larger tether may he walk Than
    may be given you.

51
Speaker
  • Mad as the sea and wind, when both contend Which
    is the mightier in his lawless fit, Behind the
    arras hearing something stir, Whips out his
    rapier, cries, 'A rat, a rat!' And, in this
    brainish apprehension, kills The unseen good old
    man.

52
Who is described
  • Mad as the sea and wind, when both contend Which
    is the mightier in his lawless fit, Behind the
    arras hearing something stir, Whips out his
    rapier, cries, 'A rat, a rat!' And, in this
    brainish apprehension, kills The unseen good old
    man.

53
Who is spoken to?
  • Mad as the sea and wind, when both contend Which
    is the mightier in his lawless fit, Behind the
    arras hearing something stir, Whips out his
    rapier, cries, 'A rat, a rat!' And, in this
    brainish apprehension, kills The unseen good old
    man.

54
Is this statement true or false?
  • Mad as the sea and wind, when both contend Which
    is the mightier in his lawless fit, Behind the
    arras hearing something stir, Whips out his
    rapier, cries, 'A rat, a rat!' And, in this
    brainish apprehension, kills The unseen good old
    man.

55
Speaker
  • The queen Lives almost by his looks and for
    myself-- My virtue or my plague, be it either
    which-- She's so conjunctive to my life and
    soul, That, as the star moves not but in his
    sphere, I could not but by her.

56
Who is referred to by his?
  • The queen Lives almost by his looks and for
    myself-- My virtue or my plague, be it either
    which-- She's so conjunctive to my life and
    soul, That, as the star moves not but in his
    sphere, I could not but by her.

57
Speaker
  • My lord, I will be ruled The rather, if you
    could devise it so That I might be the organ.

58
Who is spoken to?
  • My lord, I will be ruled The rather, if you
    could devise it so That I might be the organ.

59
Speaker
  • that we would do We should do when we would for
    this 'would' changes And hath abatements and
    delays as many As there are tongues, are hands,
    are accidents And then this 'should' is like a
    spendthrift sigh, That hurts by easing.

60
Who is spoken to?
  • that we would do We should do when we would for
    this 'would' changes And hath abatements and
    delays as many As there are tongues, are hands,
    are accidents And then this 'should' is like a
    spendthrift sigh, That hurts by easing.

61
Speaker
  • The other motive, Why to a public count I might
    not go, Is the great love the general gender bear
    him

62
Who is referred to by him?
  • The other motive, Why to a public count I might
    not go, Is the great love the general gender bear
    him

63
Speaker?
  • We are oft to blame in this,-- 'Tis too much
    proved--that with devotion's visage And pious
    action we do sugar o'er The devil himself.

64
The theme discussed is
  • We are oft to blame in this,-- 'Tis too much
    proved--that with devotion's visage And pious
    action we do sugar o'er The devil himself.
  • A. disguise B. revenge
  • C. madness

65
Speaker?
  • There, on the pendent boughs her coronet
    weeds Clambering to hang, an envious sliver
    broke When down her weedy trophies and
    herself Fell in the weeping brook.

66
Who is described?
  • There, on the pendent boughs her coronet
    weeds Clambering to hang, an envious sliver
    broke When down her weedy trophies and
    herself Fell in the weeping brook.

67
Speaker?
  • Her father and myself, lawful espials, Will so
    bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen, We may of
    their encounter frankly judge, And gather by him,
    as he is behaved, If 't be the affliction of his
    love or no That thus he suffers for.

68
Who is father?
  • Her father and myself, lawful espials, Will so
    bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen, We may of
    their encounter frankly judge, And gather by him,
    as he is behaved, If 't be the affliction of his
    love or no That thus he suffers for.

69
Who is described as he?
  • Her father and myself, lawful espials, Will so
    bestow ourselves that, seeing, unseen, We may of
    their encounter frankly judge, And gather by him,
    as he is behaved, If 't be the affliction of his
    love or no That thus he suffers for.

70
Speaker
  • How smart a lash that speech doth give my
    conscience! The harlot's cheek, beautied with
    plastering art, Is not more ugly to the thing
    that helps it Than is my deed to my most painted
    word

71
The theme expressed is
  • that we would do We should do when we would for
    this 'would' changes And hath abatements and
    delays as many As there are tongues, are hands,
    are accidents And then this 'should' is like a
    spendthrift sigh, That hurts by easing.
  • A. disguise B. madness
  • C. indecision

72
This speech is
  • How smart a lash that speech doth give my
    conscience! The harlot's cheek, beautied with
    plastering art, Is not more ugly to the thing
    that helps it Than is my deed to my most painted
    word
  • A. an accusation B. a plan
  • C. a paradox D. a confession

73
Speaker
  • To die, to sleep To sleep perchance to dream
    ay, there's the rub For in that sleep of death
    what dreams may come When we have shuffled off
    this mortal coil, Must give us pause

74
This quote means
  • To die, to sleep To sleep perchance to dream
    ay, there's the rub For in that sleep of death
    what dreams may come When we have shuffled off
    this mortal coil, Must give us pause
  • A. people are afraid of what comes after death
  • B. people are afraid to dream
  • C. people are afraid to sleep

75
Speaker
  • O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The
    courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue,
    sword The expectancy and rose of the fair
    state, The glass of fashion and the mould of
    form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite
    down!

76
Who is described
  • O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown! The
    courtier's, soldier's, scholar's, eye, tongue,
    sword The expectancy and rose of the fair
    state, The glass of fashion and the mould of
    form, The observed of all observers, quite, quite
    down!

77
This line means
  • O, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!
  • A. the person described is dead
  • B. the person described is in disguise
  • C. the person described is insane

78
This line means
  • The expectancy and rose of the fair state
  • A. the person described is like a flower
  • B. the person described will be the next ruler
  • C. The person described is expecting a baby

79
Speaker
  • About, my brain! I have heard That guilty
    creatures sitting at a play Have by the very
    cunning of the scene Been struck so to the soul
    that presently They have proclaim'd their
    malefactions For murder, though it have no
    tongue, will speak With most miraculous organ.

80
Speaker
  • But, O, what form of prayer Can serve my turn?
    'Forgive me my foul murder'? That cannot be
    since I am still possess'd Of those effects for
    which I did the murder, My crown, mine own
    ambition and my queen. May one be pardon'd and
    retain the offence?

81
Speaker
  • Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go.

82
Who is described?
  • Madness in great ones must not unwatch'd go.

83
Speaker
  • Nay, then, I have an eye of you

84
Who is spoken to
  • Nay, then, I have an eye of you

85
The theme is
  • Nay, then, I have an eye of you
  • A. indecision B. madness
  • C. surveillance D. disguise

86
Speaker
  • You could, for a need, study a speech of some
    dozen or sixteen lines, which I would set down
    and insert in't, could you not?

87
Speaker
  • I'll have grounds More relative than this the
    play 's the thing Wherein I'll catch the
    conscience of the king.

88
Speaker
  • What if it tempt you toward the flood, my
    lord, Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff That
    beetles o'er his base into the sea, And there
    assume some other horrible form, Which might
    deprive your sovereignty of reason And draw you
    into madness? think of it The very place puts
    toys of desperation, Without more motive, into
    every brain That looks so many fathoms to the
    sea And hears it roar beneath.

89
Who is spoken to
  • What if it tempt you toward the flood, my
    lord, Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff That
    beetles o'er his base into the sea, And there
    assume some other horrible form, Which might
    deprive your sovereignty of reason And draw you
    into madness? think of it The very place puts
    toys of desperation, Without more motive, into
    every brain That looks so many fathoms to the
    sea And hears it roar beneath.

90
What does the pronoun it refer to?
  • What if it tempt you toward the flood, my
    lord, Or to the dreadful summit of the cliff That
    beetles o'er his base into the sea, And there
    assume some other horrible form, Which might
    deprive your sovereignty of reason And draw you
    into madness? think of it The very place puts
    toys of desperation, Without more motive, into
    every brain That looks so many fathoms to the
    sea And hears it roar beneath.

91
Speaker
  • Now might I do it pat, now he is praying And now
    I'll do't. And so he goes to heaven And so am I
    revenged. That would be scann'd

92
Who is he?
  • Now might I do it pat, now he is praying And now
    I'll do't. And so he goes to heaven And so am I
    revenged. That would be scann'd

93
This line means
  • That would be scann'd
  • A. I should run that through the scanner.
  • B. I should do that.
  • C. I should think about that.

94
Speaker
  • speak no more Thou turn'st mine eyes into my
    very soul And there I see such black and grained
    spots As will not leave their tinct.

95
Who is spoken to
  • speak no more Thou turn'st mine eyes into my
    very soul And there I see such black and grained
    spots As will not leave their tinct.

96
Speaker
  • Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of
    truth And thus do we of wisdom and of
    reach, With windlasses and with assays of
    bias, By indirections find directions out

97
Who is spoken to?
  • Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of
    truth And thus do we of wisdom and of
    reach, With windlasses and with assays of
    bias, By indirections find directions out

98
The theme expressed is
  • Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of
    truth And thus do we of wisdom and of
    reach, With windlasses and with assays of
    bias, By indirections find directions out
  • A. madness B. indecision
  • C. disguise D. perception of reality

99
What poetic device is used?
  • Your bait of falsehood takes this carp of
    truth And thus do we of wisdom and of
    reach, With windlasses and with assays of
    bias, By indirections find directions out

100
Speaker
  • My tables,--meet it is I set it down, That one
    may smile, and smile, and be a villain

101
The theme expressed is
  • My tables,--meet it is I set it down, That one
    may smile, and smile, and be a villain
  • A. madness B. disguise
  • C. indecision D. revenge

102
speaker
  • Come, come, and sit you down you shall not
    budge You go not till I set you up a glass Where
    you may see the inmost part of you.

103
Who is spoken to
  • Come, come, and sit you down you shall not
    budge You go not till I set you up a glass Where
    you may see the inmost part of you.

104
This quote means
  • Come, come, and sit you down you shall not
    budge You go not till I set you up a glass Where
    you may see the inmost part of you.
  • A. I want to hurt you.
  • B. I want you to examine your inner thoughts.
  • C. I want you to fix your makeup in the mirror.

105
Speaker
  • Be thou assured, if words be made of breath, And
    breath of life, I have no life to breathe What
    thou hast said to me.

106
Who is spoken to
  • Be thou assured, if words be made of breath, And
    breath of life, I have no life to breathe What
    thou hast said to me.

107
Speaker
  • Haste me to know't, that I, with wings as
    swift As meditation or the thoughts of love, May
    sweep to my revenge.

108
Who is spoken to
  • Haste me to know't, that I, with wings as
    swift As meditation or the thoughts of love, May
    sweep to my revenge.

109
Speaker
  • Here, as before, never, so help you mercy, How
    strange or odd soe'er I bear myself, As I
    perchance hereafter shall think meet To put an
    antic disposition on, That you, at such times
    seeing me, never shall, With arms encumber'd
    thus, or this headshake, Or by pronouncing of
    some doubtful phrase, As 'Well, well, we know,'
    or 'We could, an if we would,' Or 'If we list to
    speak,' or 'There be, an if they might,' Or such
    ambiguous giving out, to note That you know aught
    of me this not to do, So grace and mercy at your
    most need help you, Swear.

110
Speaker
  • I entreat you both, That, being of so young days
    brought up with him, And sith so neighbour'd to
    his youth and havior, That you vouchsafe your
    rest here in our court Some little time so by
    your companies To draw him on to pleasures, and
    to gather, So much as from occasion you may
    glean, Whether aught, to us unknown, afflicts him
    thus, That, open'd, lies within our remedy.

111
Who is spoken to
  • I entreat you both, That, being of so young days
    brought up with him, And sith so neighbour'd to
    his youth and havior, That you vouchsafe your
    rest here in our court Some little time so by
    your companies To draw him on to pleasures, and
    to gather, So much as from occasion you may
    glean, Whether aught, to us unknown, afflicts him
    thus, That, open'd, lies within our remedy.

112
Who is spoken about
  • I entreat you both, That, being of so young days
    brought up with him, And sith so neighbour'd to
    his youth and havior, That you vouchsafe your
    rest here in our court Some little time so by
    your companies To draw him on to pleasures, and
    to gather, So much as from occasion you may
    glean, Whether aught, to us unknown, afflicts him
    thus, That, open'd, lies within our remedy.

113
The theme is
  • I entreat you both, That, being of so young days
    brought up with him, And sith so neighbour'd to
    his youth and havior, That you vouchsafe your
    rest here in our court Some little time so by
    your companies To draw him on to pleasures, and
    to gather, So much as from occasion you may
    glean, Whether aught, to us unknown, afflicts him
    thus, That, open'd, lies within our remedy.
  • A. indecision B. surveillance
  • C. revenge

114
Speaker
  • Why, any thing, but to the purpose. You were
    sent for and there is a kind of confession in
    your looks which your modesties have not craft
    enough to colour I know the good king and queen
    have sent for you.

115
Who is spoken to
  • Why, any thing, but to the purpose. You were
    sent for and there is a kind of confession in
    your looks which your modesties have not craft
    enough to colour I know the good king and queen
    have sent for you.

116
Speaker
  • My words fly up, my thoughts remain below Words
    without thoughts never to heaven go.

117
Speaker
  • Nothing but to show you how a king may go
    a progress through the guts of a beggar.

118
Who is spoken to
  • Nothing but to show you how a king may go
    a progress through the guts of a beggar.

119
These lines are
  • Nothing but to show you how a king may go
    a progress through the guts of a beggar.
  • A. a compliment B. a threat
  • C. an insult D. a reward
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