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Working Safely With Display Screen Equipment

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Working Safely With Display Screen Equipment Mark Mallen Health And Safety Manager Fenlock-Hansen Ltd Please Switch off or place on silent Introduction DSE? – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Working Safely With Display Screen Equipment


1
Working Safely With Display Screen Equipment
  • Mark Mallen
  • Health And Safety Manager
  • Fenlock-Hansen Ltd

2
(No Transcript)
3
Please
  • Switch off or place on silent

4
Introduction
  • DSE?
  • Why am I here?

5
Course Content
  • Legal framework
  • Hazards and potential health effects
  • Users and those at risk
  • Setting up workstations
  • Using the workstation
  • Exercises
  • Summary

6
Legal Framework
  • The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment)
    Regulations 1992
  • the VDU Regs
  • Part of the six pack
  • Aim of preventing ill health
  • Imposes legal responsibilities and duties

7
Legal Framework
  • Employers Duties
  • Assess risks
  • Provide a healthy workplace
  • Ensure workstations comply
  • Eyesight tests
  • Provide information, instruction and training

8
Legal Framework
  • Employees duties
  • Follow the rules
  • Work safely
  • Report problems

9
Hazards And Potential Health Effects
  • Hazards
  • Poor posture
  • Too long
  • Poor working environment
  • Poor management of workload

10
Hazards And Potential Health Effects
  • Potential health effects
  • Visual discomfort
  • Sore
  • Irritated
  • Tired
  • Headaches
  • Upper limb disorders
  • Aches and pains
  • Stress

11
Vision
  • Eyesight gradually worsens with age
  • Contact lenses
  • A dry atmosphere
  • Blinking less
  • Use the Hansen Eyecare scheme
  • Report problems
  • Seek medical advice

12
Musculoskeletal
  • General fatigue, aches and pains
  • Workstation problem
  • May indicate other problems

13
Musculoskeletal
  • Many musculoskeletal disorders start with
  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Aching hands, fingers or limbs

14
Musculoskeletal
  • Long term
  • Problems may get worse
  • Dont leave things
  • If you suffer discomfort
  • Report it
  • Seek medical advice asap

15
Common Misconceptions
  • Do not give off harmful radiation
  • Cause complications during pregnancy
  • Source national radiological protection board
  • Unlikely to induce epileptic seizures or fits
  • Discuss concerns with your doctor

16
Common Misconceptions
  • Eyesight
  • Do not damage eyesight
  • Any concerns
  • Seek advice

17
Users and Those at Risk
  • Defined as
  • Have no alternative
  • Need significant training or particular skills
  • Continuous spells of an hour or more
  • Use the equipment most days
  • Have to input data quickly or accurately
  • Need high levels of concentration or undertake
    critical work

18
Users
  • Hansen define regular users as
  • Either at least one-hour continuous work or
  • Two hours accumulatively
  • Risk low if users follow safe working procedures

19
High Risk Users
  • Working all day with a screen
  • Inputting
  • Word processing
  • A computer aided design (CAD) operator

20
Moderate Risk Users
  • A secretary or personal assistant

21
Low Risk Users
  • A salesperson that inputs daily sales figures
  • Somebody that does not use a DSE every day

22
Not Users
  • A senior manager who uses the screen for brief
    enquiries

23
Not Users
  • A receptionist, who occasionally, interrogates a
    system

24
Assessing the Risk
  • Assess each workstation
  • Trained assessors
  • Standard pro forma
  • Ergonomic approach

25
Setting Up Workstations
  • Ergonomics
  • Adapting the task to fit the worker
  • Adjust and use the equipment in an ergonomic way
  • No single, perfect workstation
  • Adjusted to individuals requirements

26
The Workstation
  • The chair
  • A footrest (if required)
  • HIDs
  • The display screen
  • The worktop

27
The Workstation
  • A properly adjusted workstation
  • Comfortable and pleasant to use
  • Prevents ill health
  • May increase productivity

28
Posture and Seating
  • Working in an awkward position
  • Short term
  • Aches, pains and fatigue
  • Long term harm
  • Strain on joints and muscles

29
Seat Height and Tilt
  • Height
  • Forearms horizontal with the keyboard
  • Tilt (if fitted)
  • Thighs horizontal

30
Seat Height and Tilt
  • Feet flat on the floor or footrest
  • Weight on buttocks
  • Not thighs

31
Back Support
  • Should fit the curve of the spine
  • Adjust the angle (if possible)
  • Upright posture
  • Erect head and relaxed shoulders
  • Varying position helps avoid stiffness

32
Arm Rests
  • Personal preference
  • May be beneficial
  • Should not interfere with keying
  • Should allow the chair under the desk
  • Not a legal requirement

33
Chair Position
  • Allow room
  • Prevent stiffness
  • Do not store items under the desk
  • If the desk is not height adjustable
  • Set the chair for the best keyboard height

34
Posture and Seating
  • In summary
  • Head up
  • Back straight
  • Lower back supported
  • Shoulders back
  • Forearms level with the desk
  • Wrists relaxed
  • Feet flat on the floor or on the footrest

35
Keyboard
  • Directly in front of the user
  • Gap to rest the heels of the hands
  • Fingers comfortably on the keys
  • Adjust the angle of slope
  • Position devices
  • Do not stretch too far

36
Mouse Work
  • Comfortable and convenient position
  • Move keyboard until it is required
  • Device used most often to the front
  • Adjust the controls to personal preference

37
Keyboard and Mouse Work
  • Caution, with extreme concentration
  • Users may become fixated
  • Ignore arm and hand position
  • Causing cramp and wrist strain

38
The Display Screen
  • Adjust to suit workplace lighting
  • Moving the screen may eliminate reflection
  • Check the screen for glare or reflections

39
The Display Screen
  • Glare
  • Can be irritating
  • Cause eye fatigue
  • Force users to adopt awkward postures

40
The Display Screen
  • Face the screen looking slightly down
  • The top of the screen slightly below eye height
  • Viewing distance between 350mm and 750mm

41
The Display Screen
  • Tilted at right angles to the line of sight
  • Check refresh rate, 80hz
  • Adjust the brightness and contrast
  • Re-adjust if light levels change
  • Large screens need more desk space,readjust

42
The Display Screen
  • Keep the screen clean
  • Degrades the image
  • Highlights glare
  • May make reasonably positioned screen difficult
    to use

43
Glare Filters
  • Can reduce reflections
  • May affect quality
  • Use where moving a screen or light source cannot
    reduce glare
  • Should only be used as a last resort

44
Housekeeping
  • Everything within easy reach
  • Stretching or reaching can cause stress and strain

45
Housekeeping
  • Keep cables under control to prevent tripping
  • Store work and personal items out of the way
  • Keep the work area free from clutter
  • Keep papers under control on the desk
  • A tidy desk is a healthy desk

46
Adjusting Workstations
  • Ideal position
  • Display screen and keyboard
  • Directly in front of the user
  • Some tasks require more space in front
  • Some touch typists prefer a document holder
  • Prevents users frequently moving their heads

47
Using the Workstation
  • The risks from using DSE
  • Working for too long in one position
  • Working with a poor posture
  • Working for too long without a break

48
Most at Risk
  • Inputting large amounts of data within limited
    time scales
  • Data input clerks
  • Word processor operators
  • CAD operators

49
Reducing the Risk
  • Regularly change posture
  • Manage the workload
  • Take regular breaks
  • About 5-10 minutes in every hour
  • Break up the screen work throughout the day

50
Reducing the Risk
  • Guidance from the regulations
  • Breaks of 5 - 10 minutes, every 50 - 60 minutes
  • Frequent short breaks
  • If not
  • Change position regularly
  • Stand
  • Flex your body

51
Reducing the Risk
  • Maintain a good working environment
  • Reasonable temperature
  • Acceptable humidity
  • Reasonably well ventilated

52
Exercises to Prevent Aches and Pains
  • Seek medical advice
  • before starting any exercise
  • or if you have a medical condition
  • Stop if you experience any pain

53
Exercises To Prevent Aches And Pains
  • Warm up
  • Flex the fingers and wrist
  • Rub your hands together to warm up the muscles
  • Eyes
  • Regularly look away from the screen
  • At objects in the far distance

54
Exercises to Prevent Aches and Pains
  • Neck
  • Face straight ahead, slowly turn the head one way
    then the other
  • Roll your head from side to side
  •  Shoulders
  • Shrug the shoulders and release

55
Exercises to Prevent Aches and Pains
  • Arms
  • Raise arms over head and stretch
  • Back
  • Move slightly forward on the chair
  • Straighten up, raising chest up and out
  • Hold for a few seconds, and then relax

56
Exercises to Prevent Aches and Pains
  • Wrists and hands
  • Flex and rotate the wrists
  • Spread the fingers as wide as possible and hold
    for a few seconds
  • Repeat a few times

57
Remember
  • These exercises can be undertaken at the
    workstation
  • Without much effort
  • Will help to keep joints and muscles loose and
    flexible

58
In Summary
  • Health effects biggest issue
  • Ill health can be minimised
  • Set up the workstation properly
  • Organise the work
  • Vision problems or headaches
  • Ask for an eye test

59
In Summary
  • Take exercise
  • Stillness is our enemy
  • Report problems
  • Better to deal with aches and pains than
    ill-health issues

60
Working Safely With Display Screen Equipment
  • Thanks for listening
  • Any questions
  • Be safe
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