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EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS AND IDENTIFYING WORKABLE SOLUTIONS DEPRESSION, BIPOLAR DISORDER, DISORDER ALONG WITH ANXIETY

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Title: EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS AND IDENTIFYING WORKABLE SOLUTIONS DEPRESSION, BIPOLAR DISORDER, DISORDER ALONG WITH ANXIETY


1
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS AND IDENTIFYING
WORKABLE SOLUTIONS DEPRESSION, BIPOLAR
DISORDER, DISORDER ALONG WITH ANXIETY
  • DEVELOPED BY
  • TINA HOLLAND
  • DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
  • THE MOOD DISORDERS OF MANITOBA

2
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS
  • 90 of people who have a mood disorder
  • never seek treatment
  • 1 in 3 Canadians will be affected by a mood
    disorder sometime in their lifetime
  • 1 in 5 will be affected by a mood disorder this
    year
  • The Canadian economy losses
  • Approximately 52 Billion dollars per year
  • Due to Mood Disorders

3
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS
  • What are Mood Disorders?
  • They are
  • Treatable ILLNESSES

4
What do Mood Disorders Affect
  • The way a person feels about themselves
  • The way they think about things
  • The way they may act or react in certain
    situations

5
WHO MAYBE AT RISK FOR A MOOD DISORDER?
  • People who have family members with depression.
  • People who have experienced a stressful or
    traumatic life event.
  • People who lack self-esteem
  • People who abuse alcohol, drugs or gamble.
  • People who lack the social support of a spouse,
    friends or extended family.
  • People who have a chronic medical illness or
    persistent pain.

6
WHAT IS DEPRESSION ?
  • DEPRESSION IS
  • Not the same as a blue mood.
  • It is not a sign of personal weakness.
  • or a condition that can be willed away or wished
    away.
  • People with depressive illness cannot merely
  • pull themselves together.

7
HOW CAN YOU TELL IF SOMEONE IS DEPRESSED?
  • A PERSON WHO IS DEPRESSED WILL EXIBIT
  • 4 OR MORE
  • OF THE FOLLOWING SYMPTOMS
  • FOR
  • LONGER THAN 2 WEEKS
  • The severity of symptoms varies with individuals
  • ONLY A DOCTOR CAN PROPERLY DIAGNOSE YOU

8
SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION
  • Feelings of sadness, hopelessness
  • Empty mood
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness
  • Low self esteem
  • Irritability, getting angry for no reason

9
SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION
  • Isolating yourself from people you once enjoyed
    being with
  • Loss of energy, no motivation
  • Sleeping disturbance increase or decrease

10
SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION
  • Eating disturbance increase or decrease
  • Poor concentration, difficulty making decisions
  • Sense of impending doom or disaster
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

11
TYPES OF DEPRESSION
  • CLINICAL DEPRESSION
  • DYSTHYMIA
  • SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER or SAD
  • SITUATIONAL DEPRESSION
  • SECONDARY DEPRESSION

12
TEEN DEPRESSION
  • Teenage depression is surprisingly common.
  • It is one of the most common emotional
    disturbances among high school students. More
    girls are affected than boys.
  • Depressed teenagers may show different behaviour
    than depressed adults.
  • Children and teens often have additional
    psychiatric disorders, such as behaviour
    disorders or substance abuse problems.

13
How do you know if a teenager has depression?
  • The following is a guide
  • To say a child has clinically significant
    depression (aka Major Depressive Disorder),
  • they must have five of the following symptoms
    listed below to such a degree that it
    significantly interferes with their functioning
    for at least
  • two weeks straight.

14
TEEN DEPRESSION How do you know if a teenager has
depression? (continued)
  • Neglect of personal appearance
  • Aggression refusal to cooperate, antisocial
    behaviour
  • Extreme sensitivity to rejection or failure
  • Use of alcohol or other drugs
  • Perception of being ugly when not

15
LOW SELF-ESTEEM
  • Depression does not go away by itself however,
    almost all people with depression can overcome it
    with the proper treatment

16
TEEN DEPRESSION How do you know if a teenager has
depression? (continued)
  • Thoughts or expressions of death or suicide
  • Self-destructive behaviour
  • Talk of or efforts to run away from home
  • Risk-taking behaviours
  • Frequent complaints of physical illnesses, such
    as aching arms, legs, or stomach when no cause
    can be found

17
TEEN DEPRESSION
  •  What causes teenage depression?
  • Stress Teen years are naturally a time of
    emotional and social-turmoil
  • Biology Many people who have depression have a
    biochemical imbalance in the brain that affects
    behaviour and mood.
  • This imbalance can cause depression even when
    no stressful situation exists. Because a
    persons biochemistry is partially determined by
    genetics, teens that have a close relative with
    depression are more likely to have the problem
    themselves.

18
TEEN DEPRESSION
  • How do you know if a teenager has depression?
  • The best way to determine if a teenager is
    depressed is to arrange for a diagnostic
    evaluation.
  • Only a licensed physician or psychologist can
    diagnose a person with a psychiatric disorder.

19
TEEN DEPRESSION There is help
  • Depending on the results of the evaluation, your
    physician or mental health professional may
    recommend
  • Professional counselling.
  • Psychotherapy helps teens with depression
    understand their feelings and problems and how to
    deal with them.
  • Medication.
  • Sometimes used in combination with
    psychotherapy, medication can correct the
    biochemical imbalances that cause depressive
    feelings and behaviours.
  • Several different categories of antidepressant
    medications, which are not habit-forming, are
    available today.
  • When carefully prescribed and monitored by a
    physician, these medications can relieve the
    severity, frequency, and duration of depressive
    episodes in three to six weeks.

20
TEEN DEPRESSION
  •  Adolescent and child depression is usually
    accompanied by the following behaviors
  • Uncooperative towards others
  • Doing poorly in studies and difficulties in
    getting along with others
  • Frequent complaints of headaches, stomachaches or
    other physical illnesses
  • Sliding personal appearance
  • Feeling misunderstood / disapproved of
  • Excessive sleeping
  • Persistent boredom, low energy, poor
    concentration

21
NEXT BIPOLAR DISORDER
22
BIPOLAR DISORDER
  • is a treatable illness marked by extreme changes
    in mood, thought, energy, and behaviour.
  • it used to be known as Manic Depression
  • a persons mood can alternate between the "poles"
    mania (highs) and depression (lows). This change
    in mood or "mood swing" can last for hours, days
    weeks or months.
  • These swings can be severe, ranging from extreme
    energy to deep despair.
  •  

23
Bipolar Disorder
  •  Bipolar Disorder affects approximately 1.5 of
    all people.
  • In Canada, more than 450,000 people have, or
    will have this disorder.
  • Although not a single cause has been identified,
    it is known that many factors, including
    biochemical, genetics, and environment play a
    part in this illness. 

24
BIPOLAR DISORDER
  • BIPOLAR I DISORDER
  • Bipolar I disorder is the most severe form of the
    illness marked by extreme manic episodes.
  • BIPOLAR II DISORDER
  • Hypomanic episodes have symptoms similar to manic
    episodes but are less severe, but must be clearly
    different from a persons non-depressed mood.
  • For some, Hypomanic episodes are not severe
    enough to cause notable problems in social
    activities or work. However, for others, they can
    be troublesome.
  •  

25
Symptoms of mania the "highs" of bipolar
disorder
  • Increased physical and mental activity and energy
  • Heightened mood, exaggerated optimism and
    self-confidence
  • Excessive irritability, aggressive behaviour
  • Decreased need for sleep without experiencing
    fatigue
  • Uncontrolled spending

26
Symptoms of mania the "highs" of bipolar
disorder
  • Grandiose delusions, inflated sense of
    self-importance
  • Racing speech, racing thoughts, flight of ideas
  • Impulsiveness, poor judgment, distractibility
  • Reckless behaviour 
  • In the most severe cases, delusions and
    hallucinations

27
Symptoms of - the "lows" of bipolar disorder are
significantly more destructive then in depression
  • Prolonged sadness or unexplained crying spells
  • Significant changes in appetite and sleep
    patterns
  • Irritability, anger, worry, agitation, anxiety
  • Pessimism, indifference
  • Loss of energy, persistent lethargy

28
Symptoms of - the "lows" of bipolar disorder are
significantly more destructive then in depression
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness
  • Inability to concentrate, indecisiveness
  • Inability to take pleasure in former interests,
    social withdrawal
  • Unexplained aches and pains
  • Recurring thoughts of death or suicide

29
What causes Bipolar Disorder?
  • Research suggests that an improper balance of
    neurotransmitters in the brain is related to the
    symptoms and episodes of depression and mania.
  • The biochemical imbalance may represent a genetic
    vulnerability set into motion by prolonged
    stress, trauma, physical illness, or some other
    environmental factor.
  • Medications work for most people by correcting
    the chemical imbalance.
  • There is growing evidence that heredity is
    involved, especially in the more recurrent forms
    of the disorder. The exact mechanism by which
    Bipolar Disorder is transmitted from one
    generation to the next is not known.
  •  

30
BIPOLAR DISORDER
  • Fortunately very effective treatments are
    available to stabilize your mood and help you
    regain and maintain a satisfying and productive
    life

31
BIPOLAR DISORDER
  • People with bipolar disorder need to remember
  • Every mania is followed by a sudden and deep
    depression.
  • It is almost impossible to stay focused and
    really accomplish anything if you are off your
    medication.

32
Keep in mind
  • No two people become depressed or Manic in the
    same way.
  • Bipolar and depression are illnesses.
  • Having it is not your fault.
  • Depression affects both men and woman.
  • Address depression or bipolar now, before it gets
    any worse.

33
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar Disorder
34
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar Disorder
  • It is a disorder of the brain marked by extreme
    changes in mood, energy, and behavior.
  • Symptoms may be present since infancy or early
    childhood, or may suddenly emerge in adolescence
    or adulthood.
  • Until recently, a diagnosis of the disorder was
    rarely made in childhood.
  • Doctors can now recognize and treat bipolar
    disorder in young children.

35
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar Disorder
  •  Early intervention and treatment are key
  • Children with emerging bipolar disorder need to
    achieve stability, gain the best possible level
    of wellness, and grow up to enjoy their gifts and
    build upon their strengths.
  • Proper treatment can minimize the adverse
    effects of the illness on their lives and the
    lives of those who love them.

36
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS
  • What to look for?
  • Symptoms increasing in duration and intensity.
  • Inability to function as usual.
  • What seemed a temporary mood may have become a
    clinical illness if it lasts for a longer period
    of time.

37
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • How common is bipolar disorder in children?
  •  It is suspected that a significant number of
    children diagnosed with attention-deficit
    disorder with hyperactivity (ADHD) have
    early-onset bipolar disorder instead of, or along
    with, ADHD.
  • According to the American Academy of Child and
    Adolescent Psychiatry, up to one-third of the 3.4
    million children and adolescents with depression
    may actually be experiencing the early onset of
    bipolar disorder.
  • Bipolar disorder looks different in children than
    it does in adults. Children usually have rapid
    and severe cycling between moods producing
    chronic irritability and few clear periods of
    wellness between episodes.

38
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • Symptoms may include
  • An expansive or irritable mood
  • Depression
  • Rapidly changing moods lasting a few hours to a
    few days
  • Explosive, lengthy, and often destructive rages
  • Separation anxiety
  • Defiance of authority
  • Hyperactivity, agitation, distractibility
  • Strong and frequent cravings, often for
    carbohydrates and sweets

39
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • Symptoms continued
  • Sleeping little or, alternatively, sleeping too
    much
  • Bed-wetting and night terrors
  • Excessive involvement in multiple projects and
    activities
  • Impaired judgment, impulsivity, racing thoughts,
    pressure to keep talking
  • Dare-devil behaviours
  • Inappropriate or precocious sexual behaviour
  • Delusions and hallucinations
  • Grandiose belief in own abilities that defy the
    laws of logic (Ability to fly, for example)

40
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  •  
  •  Adolescents who seemed normal until puberty
    and experience a comparatively sudden onset of
    symptoms are thought to be especially vulnerable
    to developing addiction to drugs or alcohol.
  • Substances may be readily available among their
    peers and teens may use them to attempt to
    control their mood swings and insomnia.
  • If addiction develops, it is essential to treat
    both the bipolar disorder and the substance abuse
    at the same time.

41
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • What role does genetics or family history play in
    bipolar disorder?
  • The illness tends to be highly genetic, but there
    are clearly environmental factors that influence
    whether the illness will occur in a particular
    child.
  • Bipolar disorder can skip generations and take
    different forms in different individuals.

42
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • The small group of studies that have been done
    vary in the estimate of risk to a given
    individual
  • For the general population, a conservative
    estimate of an individuals risk of having
    full-blown bipolar disorder is 1 percent.
    Disorders in the bipolar spectrum may affect 46
    .
  • When one parent has bipolar disorder, the risk to
    each child is 15 to 30.
  • When both parents have bipolar disorder, the risk
    increases to 50 to 75.
  • The risk in siblings and fraternal twins is 15 to
    25.
  • The risk in identical twins is approximately 70.

43
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • The need for prompt and proper diagnosis
  • Tragically, after symptoms first appear in
    children, years often pass before treatment
    begins, if ever.
  • Meanwhile, the disorder worsens and the childs
    functioning at home, school, and in the community
    is progressively more impaired.
  • The importance of proper diagnosis cannot be
    overstated. The results of untreated or
    improperly treated bipolar disorder can include

44
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • The need for prompt and proper diagnosis
  • An unnecessary increase in symptomatic behaviours
    leading to removal from school, placement in a
    residential treatment center, hospitalization in
    a psychiatric hospital, or incarceration in the
    juvenile justice system.
  • The development of personality disorders such as
    narcissistic, antisocial, and borderline
    personality.
  • A worsening of the disorder due to incorrect
    medications.
  • Drug abuse, accidents, and suicide.

45
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  •  It is important to remember that a diagnosis is
    not a scientific fact
  • There is no blood test or brain scan, as yet that
    can establish a diagnosis of bipolar disorder.
  • Parents who suspect that their child has bipolar
    disorder (or any psychiatric illness) should take
    daily notes of their childs mood, behaviors,
    sleep patterns, and unusual events, and
    statements by the child of concern to the
    parents.
  • Share these notes with the doctor making the
    evaluation and with the doctor who eventually
    treats your child.
  • Some parents fax or email a copy of their notes
    to the doctor before each appointment.

46
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  •  The response to medications and treatment
    varies.
  • Medication
  • Few controlled studies have been done on the use
    of psychiatric medications in children.
  • Only a handful of medications for pediatric use
    have been approved.
  • Psychiatrists must adapt what they know about
    treating adults to children and adolescents.

47
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • Other treatments, such as psychotherapy, may not
    be effective until mood stabilization occurs.
  • In fact, stimulants and antidepressants given
    without a mood stabilizer (often the result of
    misdiagnosis) can cause havoc in bipolar
    children,
  • potentially inducing mania, more frequent
    cycling, and increases in aggressive outbursts.

48
EARLY-ONSET Bipolar disorder
  • A Turning Point
  • Learning that ones child has bipolar disorder
    can be traumatic.
  • Diagnosis usually follows months or years of the
    childs mood instability, school difficulties,
    and damaged relationships with family and
    friends.
  • However, diagnosis can and should be a turning
    point for everyone concerned.
  • Once the illness is identified, energies can be
    directed towards treatment, education, and
    developing coping strategies.
  • There is hope and there is help.

49
(No Transcript)
50
YOU CANT CATCH A MOOD DISORDER
  • Depression and Bipolar Illness can be triggered
    by
  • Chemical imbalance
  • Biological vulnerability, heredity
  • Psychological make-up

51
SITUATIONAL FACTORS
  • THAT CAN CAUSE A MOOD DISORDER
  • Loss (death, job, status)
  • Chronic illness
  • Trauma
  • Any unwelcome change

52
What Causes a Mood Disorder?
  • Traumatic life events
  • like the death of a loved one,
  • the loss of a job,
  • Incest
  • Abuse
  • Neglect
  • or some of the things soldiers see
  • send some people into deep depression, while
    others cope with the same problem and move on.
  • PTSD will be discussed this afternoon.

53
Causes of Mood Disorders
  • Chemical Imbalance
  • Brain chemicals like
  • serotonin, norepinephrine, and cortisol may
    influence a persons energy, emotions,
  • sleeping patterns and
  • eating patterns

54
Causes of Mood Disorders
  • Chemical Imbalance
  • Studies show the most successful treatment
  • of the illness
  • involves medication
  • along with counselling
  • or therapy and self-help

55
CHEMICAL IMBALANCE
56
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS
  • What to Do?
  • Depression and bipolar are serious illnesses, and
    must be properly diagnosed.
  • See your Doctor
  • ITS UP TO YOU
  • To take responsibility for getting better, but
    there is lots of help out there.

57
This happens over and over and over again
58
MOOD DISORDERS ANXIETY
59
MOOD DISORDERS ANXIETY
  • Anxiety is a normal response to stress or danger.
  • At times it is helpful because it can help
    prepare the body for action, and it can improve
    performance in a range of situations.
  • Anxiety becomes a problem when it is experienced
    intensely and it persistently interferes with a
    persons daily life.
  • Anxiety symptoms are extremely common
  • Everybody experiences anxiety from time to time.
  • Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric
    conditions in the community.

60
MOOD DISORDER ANXIETY
  • Depression and anxiety commonly occur together.
  • Not everybody who is anxious is depressed, but
    most depressed patients have some symptoms of
    anxiety.
  • When an anxiety disorder is also present,
    depression is more severe and is more likely to
    fail to respond to treatment.

61
MOOD DISORDER ANXIETY
  • The presence of panic attacks substantially
    increases the risk of suicide in a depressed
    individual.
  • Other debilitating anxiety disorders, including
  • social phobia,
  • obsessive-compulsive disorder,
  • and post-traumatic stress disorder

62
MOOD DISORDER ANXIETY
  • Anxiety disorders appear to be common in people
    with bipolar disorder as well, yet anxiety is
    rarely discussed in the medical literature on
    bipolar illness
  • Clinicians and people with bipolar disorder may
    well be unaware of the potential very negative
    consequences of this seemingly unimportant
    complication.

63
(No Transcript)
64
GOING INTO THE LIGHT
65
GOING INTO THE LIGHT
  • There is no easy snappy answer
  • We are all looking for a quick fix like when we
    have a head ace and take a pill the head ace
    disappears
  • In real life it takes months even years to change
    our way of thinking, which has been tainted by
    our mental illness
  • Stick with it each little step is one step closer
    to mental wellness

66
Helping yourself move towards mental wellness
  • EDUCATE yourself about your illness and its
    effects on your body
  • Positive self talk, dont put yourself down
  • LIVE a more structured life, up at the same time
    and in bed at the same time everyday
  • Reduce or eliminate Alcohol, Caffeine, and
    Illicit Drugs
  • Exercise especially outdoors
  • Resist the urge to isolate yourself
  • Participate in events that will make you feel
    better
  • Schedule events and look forward to them

67
HELPING YOURSELF IN RECOVERY OF HOPE
  • Support groups allow people to privately share
    their feelings and ask questions.
  • Provide a safe place where people with mood
    disorders are accepted and understood.
  • TREAT IT-DEFEAT IT

68
EXAMINING MOOD DISORDERS AND IDENTIFYING WORKABLE
SOLUTIONS
  • It is not easy to live with a MOOD DISORDER it
    Takes Work, but
  • IT IS SO WORTH IT.
  • Everyone develops a different recovery plan and
    the right one is the one that works for you!

69
Helping yourself in Recovery
  • Remember that you are not alone!
  • Let your family or the important people in your
    life know what you are going through so they can
    help, but only if appropriate
  • And finally
  • Recovery comes in small steps and may seem very
    slow but you are improving

70
IDENTIFYING WORKABLE SOLUTIONS
  • LETS LOOK AT A VARIETY OF METHODS TO HELP YOU
    LIVE WITH A MOOD DISORDER
  • 1.ESTABLISHING A BEACON OR PURPOSE FOR YOUR LIFE
  • 2. STRESS
  • 3.EXERCISE YOUR SENSES! THE BEGINNING OF
    MINDFULNESS
  • 4.REWARDING POSITIVE ACTIVITIES
  • 5.PROBLEM-SOLVING
  • 6.KNOWING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SADNESS AND
    DEPRESSION
  • 7.RECOGNIZING DEPRESSIVE THINKING
  • 8.RELATIONSHIPS
  • 9.FINANCIAL
  • 10.PROCRASTINATION
  • 11.SMALLER BITS AND PIECES
  • 12.DAILY GRATITUDE TECHINQUE

71
1. Establishing a Beacon or Purpose for Your
Life
72
1. Establishing a Beacon or Purpose for Your Life
  •  Beacons are powerful ideas that can override
    your depressive thinking.
  • Few people snap their fingers and get a beacon.
    Beacons are usually inventions of the mind, or
    they may come from a number of other sources.
  • Beacon thoughts can appear at anytime, even when
    you least expect them.
  • They are like the Aha! moments that Oprah talks
    about on her TV show.
  •  

73
2. STRESS
  • SITUATIONgtgtgtgtgtgtgtgtgtgtgtgt
  • INTERPRETATIONgtgtgtgtgtgt
  • STRESS RESPONSE

74
3. Exercise Your Senses!
  • THE BEGINNING OF MINDFULNESS
  • Live in the moment. This is called mindfulness
    and includes many more aspects than we may be
    looking at today. In a brief explanation
    mindfulness is being fully present in the
    present.
  • Mindfulness is defined as
  • the awareness that emerges through paying
    attention on purpose, in the present moment, and
    nonjudgmentally to the unfolding of experiences
    moment by moment

75
3. Exercise Your Senses!
  • THE BEGINNING OF MINDFULNESS
  • Have you ever arrived at work, not remembering
    any scenery or landmarks during your drive?
  • At the end of your shower, you are not sure
    whether you washed your hair?
  • Or more important, think back to your last
    conversation with a loved one Do you remember
    the details of what you talked about?
  •  
  • For many, these examples highlight the fact that
    we live much of our days in automatic-pilot mode.
  • We have our routines at home and at work, and we
    go through the motions, not truly paying
    attention to what we are doing.
  • Our minds wander elsewhere, and we end up eating
    without tasting, looking without seeing, and
    talking without knowing what we are saying.

76
3. Exercise Your Senses!
  • THE BEGINNING OF MINDFULNESS
  • Mindfulness actually may lead to changes in
    thought patterns and the attitude of ones
    thoughts cognitive change. 
  • We need to practice nonjudgmental thinking as
    well as the understanding that thoughts are not
    always the reality or the truth. For example,
    feeling afraid does not necessarily mean that
    danger is imminent, and thinking I am a failure
    does not make it true
  • When you feel you are falling into a world of
    depression, try using your sensory powers to
    focus on external experiences.
  • For example walk around your neighbourhood and
    pay attention with all of your senses. Look for
    something you have not seen before. Listen for
    new sounds, like songbirds, touch a tree trunk,
    feel a breeze. Take along some favourite treat or
    coffee, and experience the taste.

77
3. Exercise Your Senses!
78
4. REWARDING POSITIVE ACTIVITIES
  • Life is so much more than trying to overcome
    negative depressive thoughts.
  • In your life prior to depression think back to
    some former activities you used to enjoy?
  • What were they?
  • Did you have dreams?
  • Do you remember them?
  • How would you spend your time if you were not
    depressed?

79
4. REWARDING POSITIVE ACTIVITIES
  • The more time you spend in meaningful pursuits,
    the less time you spend with depressive thoughts.
  • Positive activities distract from depressive
    thoughts. They can bring a change in your mood.
    For example how would you spend your time if you
    were not depressed?
  • In fact, the pursuit of meaningful activities is
    especially useful for people with bipolar
    illness.
  • Sometimes an idea that you can focus on may
    actually help you out of a depression as long as
    the depression is not too deep.

80
4. REWARDING POSITIVE ACTIVITIES
81
5. Problem-Solving
  • The problem is not that there are problems
  • the problem is expecting otherwise, and thinking
    that
  • having problems is a problem (Theodore Rubin)

82
5. Problem-Solving
  • Rational problem solver
  • Avoidance Style of problem solver
  • Impulsive/Careless style of problem solving
  • Define the Problem in clear language.
  • Take care to separate facts from assumptions.
  • Set realistic goals and Identify obstacles you
    can change.
  • Try brainstorming some problems with people you
    respect. (This is where you talk to someone about
    how you are going to proceed sometimes just
    hearing what you are saying is enough to clarify
    the process you need to map out.)
  • Generate alternatives 

83
5. Problem-Solving
  • Make decision about which to proceed with.
  • Think of both the positive and negative
    consequences of each of the alternatives.
  • Conduct cost-benefit analysis of the varying
    options
  • Develop overall action plan.
  • Rehearse the plan
  • Carry out the action plan you developed and look
    at the consequences.
  • Then evaluate the results.
  • If it is successful use the same method for
    other problems.

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5. Problem-Solving
  • PROBLEM 1
  • I almost never go out or do anything that is just
    fun.
  • If your sentence describes something that you
    dont like about your life, rewrite it to say
    what you would like instead.
  • I would like to go out with friends a few times
    a week and just enjoy myself.
  • There. If you started with a problem, you have
    changed it already.
  • You have made it into a goal.
  • The fact is that goals without any concrete plans
    often dont get accomplished.

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5. Problem-Solving
  • Remind yourself that you dont have to feel any
    pleasure by doing this. The idea is to start to
    program your brain to help prevent further
    depression by stopping the sense of isolation and
    loneliness you feel. That is what changing your
    cognitive thought patterns is all about
    REPETITION.
  • Later you can expand on this exercise to include
    positive thinking, emotions, and behaviour that
    can override depressive thinking, anxiety or
    stress-related sensations, and depressive
    behaviours.

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6. KNOWING THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SADNESS AND
DEPRESSION
  • Live in fear of loss and you fear to live
  • Write down, what is a sad thought and what is a
    depressed thought? Here is an example
  • SAD THOUGHT I miss working at my job and how
    good that made me feel about myself
  • DEPRESSED THOUGHT I am a useless person I am
    not worth anything, because I dont have a job
  • It is the personal significance of the loss that
    sadness represents.

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7. RECOGNIZING DEPRESSIVE THINKING
  • Lets look at depressive feelings, and turn them
    into thoughts. 
  • DEPRESSIVE FEELINGS
  • "I feel hopeless
  • TRANSLATIONS INTO DEPRESSIVE THOUGHTS
  • "I tell myself that my situation will never
    change. It is hopeless and I experience
    depression
  • Now you write down YOUR depressive FEELINGS.
  • That brings them into the open.
  • Now you can translate your feelings into
    thoughts.
  • By acknowledging these thoughts you can change
    them.
  •  

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7. RECOGNIZING DEPRESSIVE THINKING
  • In a depressive state, people typically draw
    within themselves, ruminate on what their
    problems are and reflect on how bad they feel.
  • Their thinking typically centres on personal
    problems, self-criticism, self-blame,
    helplessness, hopelessness, worthlessness,
    pessimism, and related states such as anxiety,
    shame, guilt, and anger.

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8. Relationships
  • Surround yourself with the best people who care
  • Who are creative
  • Let them bring you other people
  • Create together
  • Listen to your gut
  • Thank them

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9. FINANCIAL
  • Spending money can become a problem, shopping may
    help you feel temporarily happy but is that the
    way to reach real happiness
  • Question purchases is it a Want or a Need? 
  • Hint If you have trouble controlling spending,
    try putting your credit card and Interact card in
    a glass of water in the freezer. When you want to
    buy something you need to thaw the cards out and
    that gives you time to question your purchase.
    Putting the frozen glass with your card into the
    microwave will deactivate the card.

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10. PROCRASTINATION
  •  
  • Procrastination is one of the major barriers to
    overcoming depression.
  • This habit of putting things off can be a part of
    depression. It can predate depression and
    contribute to it.
  • Procrastination is an automatic habit where you
    put off, postpone or delay doing today what you
    can save for tomorrow.
  • When you procrastinate, you always substitute a
    less important activity for the one you put off.

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11. SMALLER BITS AND PIECES
  • Always break tasks into smaller pieces
  • Write down what you want to accomplish (GOALS) so
    you are reminded of them.
  • Put them up on the mirror to remind yourself of
    what you need to do.
  • Check off each piece as it is completed
  • It is fun to complete things and makes you feel
    good about yourself.
  • Dont put to many things down especially when you
    are not sure if you will be feeling well.
  •  

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12. Daily Gratitude Technique
  • At the end of each day, write down three things
    that happened for which you can be genuinely
    grateful.
  • For example, the sunrise, the sunset, the taste
    of honey, the smell of baking bread may all be
    experiences that can evoke a sense of gratitude.
    Seeking experiences to feel grateful for can help
    counteract unhealthy depressive thoughts.

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SUCCESS
  • SUCCESS CAN BE DEFINED AS AN ACHIEVEMENT
  • therefore any actions against depression are
    achievements.
  • Taking this course shows you are willing to try
    to overcome depressive negative thinking.
  • If something you try does not work, that is also
    a success, because now you know that it does not
    work and you can get on with something that will
    work.

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Life goes around and around as do out Thoughts,
Feelings and Behaviours
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MOOD DISORDERS ASSOCIATION OF MANITOBA
  • We are a self-help organization whose purpose is
    helping others to help themselves through peer
    support, education and advocacy.
  • We will increase public awareness about mood
    disorders and empower people to develop and
    manage mental wellness.
  • We will provide a welcoming atmosphere to those
    dealing with co-occurring disorders.

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THANK YOU FOR LISTENING
  • ANY QUESTIONS

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MOOD DISORDERS ASSOCIATION OF MANITOBA
  • SEE YOU THIS AFTERNOON
  • Head Office
  • 4 Fort Street
  • Winnipeg, Manitoba
  • R3C 1C4
  • sdmdam_at_depression.mb.ca
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